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Full text of "Bulletin, Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia, April, 1945"

BULLETIN 



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Catalogue Issue 
1944-1945 

A n n a u n c e m e n t s 
1915-1916 






Vol. XXXI 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



ApriL t.9« 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinmarywash312univ 



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Catalogue Issue 
1944-1945 

Announcements 
1945-1946 



The WOMAN'S COLLEGE of the UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA 



FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 



Published in January, April, June and October 



MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
of the UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA 

A Member of 

The Association of American Colleges 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 

Schoools 

The Southern Association of Colleges for Women 

The American Association of Teachers Colleges 

The Association of Virginia Colleges 

The National Association of Business Teacher-Training 

Institutions 




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Three- Year Degree Program 

To Accelerate Training for Urgent Needs of the Nation 

Recognizing the acute need for trained leadership, the increasing 
demands for men and women trained in technical skills and the pro- 
fessions, and the consequent need for preparing them for such service 
at the earliest possible date, Mary Washington College, along with 
many other colleges in the country, has a program which enables 
students in any curriculum to complete the requirements for a degree 
in three years. 

The work for a degree at Mary Washington College can be com- 
pleted in three yeras by attending three general sessions and three 
summer quarters. 

The summer quarter is an integral part of the college year. It is 
only ten weeks in length, but carries the same credit as any other 
quarter due to the fact that classes meet six days a week. Further- 
more, this quarter is divided into two terms of five weeks each, and 
a student may attend and receive credit for either one or both terms. 
There is a vacation period of four weeks between the close of the 
summer quarter and the beginning of the fall quarter. 

Increasingly large numbers of students all over the country are 
eagerly taking advantage of the opportunity to complete their degree 
programs in three years in order to meet the pressing needs of our 
country for intelligent leadership, as well as for professional, scien- 
tific, and technical service. 

Enter College in June. — In keeping with the above program, 
it is expected that students who normally enter college in September 
will enter in June, if possible, and complete one-third of a year's 
work this summer. 

Every advantage to entering college in September may be had by 
students matriculating in June, with many additional advantages, 
including economy in time and money since the summer quarter not 
only is the shortest quarter of the year but the least expensive. This 
plan also enables young professional women to enter a productive 
occupation a whole year earlier. An entire summer of vacation may 
be justified during peace times but is a luxury few people can afford 
under present conditions. 

Students who attend the summer quarter are given first considera- 
tion in such matters as scholarships and other financial assistance for 
the fall quarter and the remainder of the year. See college calendar, 
page 5. 

























































A U ** O 










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31 








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27 


28 


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— 


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29 


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29 


30 


31 













College Calendar 
1945-1946 



Summer Quarter 

1945 

Summer quarter begins Monday, June 11 

First term ends Saturday, July 14 

Second term begins Monday, July 16 

Summer quarter ends Saturday, August 18 

Summer vacation August 18-September 18 

Fall Quarter 

Dormitories open Sunday, September 16 

Faculty meeting — Chandler Hall, 

7:00 p. m., Monday, September 17 

Fall quarter opens Tuesday, September 18 

Matriculation of new students Tuesday, September 18 

Freshmen Orientation Program September 18-20 

Matriculation of upper classmen Wednesday, September 19 

Classes Begin Thursday, September 20 

*Thanksgiving holidays, after classes Wednesday, November 21 

Class work resumed 8 :30 a. m., Monday, November 26 

*Christmas holidays begin, after classes Wednesday, December 19 

Winter Quarter 

1946 

**Winter quarter begins 8 :30 a. m., Thursday, January 3 

Winter quarter ends Saturday, March 16 

Spring Quarter 

Spring quarter begins . Monday, March 18 

*Spring holidays begin, after classes Thursday, April 18 

Class work resumed 8 :30 a. m., Wednesday, April 24 

Spring quarter ends Monday, June 3 

♦All holidays are subject to change due to War conditions. 

♦♦During Christmas holidays dormitories and dining halls will be closed and will 
not re-open until Wednesday, January 2, 1946. Students are requested not to return 
to college before that date. 



Table of Contents 



Introductory page 

Accreditation . 2 

Three- Year Degree Program 3 

Enter College in June 3 

College Calendar 5 

Correspondence and Visitors 9 

Official Directory 

Rector and Visitors 10 

Officers of Administration and Assistants 11 

Officers of Instruction 13 

Demonstration and Student Teaching 22 

Alumnae Association 27 

The College 

General Information 

History of the College 28 

Purpose . 28 

Location and Environment 29 

Historic Fredericksburg 29 

Field Trips and Tours , 32 

Accessibility and Transportation 33 

Climate and Health 33 

Buildings and Accommodations 33 

Lyceum Series 38 

Admission and Expenses 

Admission 39 

Directions for Admission 40 

Advanced Standing 41 

Expenses 41 

For Residents of Virginia 42 

For Non-Residents of Virginia 42 

For Off-Campus Students 42 

Virginia Students Defined 43 

Part-Time and Evening School Students 43 

Room Reservation Fee 43 

Terms of Payment 44 

Late Registration Fee 44 

Laboratory Fees . 44 

Books and Supplies 45 

Fee for Use of Radio 45 

Academic Costumes 45 

Special Examination Fee 45 

Diploma Fee 45 

Credit 45 

Refund of Fees 46 

Withdrawal =. 46 

Residence Halls 

Room Furnishings 46 

Room Assignment 47 

Rooming Regulations 47 

Financial Aid 

Scholarships, Loan Funds, and Employment 48 

Miscellaneous Information 50 

Guests 51 



PAGE 

Administration 

Organization 52 

Quarter Unity 52 

Summer Quarter 52 

Extension Work 52 

Evening Classes 53 

Part-Time and Evening Students 53 

Classification of Students 53 

Student Load 54 

Change of Schedule or Courses 54 

Grading 54 

Scholarship Quality Points 55 

The Dean's List 56 

Reports, Deficiencies and Failures 56 

Scholastic Achievement Necessary to Remain in College 57 

Excuses, Absences, and Class-Cuts 57 

Week-End Visits 58 

Student Teaching, Observation and Demonstration 59 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching 59 

Requirements for Graduation 60 

Placement Bureau 60 

Lectures 61 

Terminology 61 

Student Welfare 62 

Guidance and Supervision 62 

Government and Discipline 63 

The Honor System 63 

Health 64 

Personality Development 66 

Religious Life 67 

Social Life 68 

Dress 1 68 

Student Organizations and Activities 69 

Radio Broadcasting Workshop 75 

Program of Studies 

Degrees . , 76 

New Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 

Science 76 

Major Programs Offered 78 

Degrees Conferred 78 

Curricula Leading to the A.B. and B.S. Degrees in the Arts and 

Sciences 79 

Curriculum I — Leading to the Bachelor of Arts Degree 80-81 

Curriculum II — Leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree 82-83 

Medical or Technical Secretarial Course 84 

Curriculum III — Leading to the B.S. Degree for Laboratory 

Assistants and Specialists 85-86 

Curricula in Pre-Professional or Foundation Courses 87 

Curriculum IV — Two-Year Pre-Professional or Foundation 

Courses 88 

Curriculum in Commerce, Business and Secretarial Science 89 

Technical Secretarial Course 89 

Curriculum V — Commerce, Business and Secretarial Science__90-91 

Health and Physical Education 92 

Curriculum VI — Health and Physical Education 93-94 

Music 95 

Curricula VII— A, B, C, and D— Music 96-100 

Dietetics and Home Economics 101 

Curricula VIII — A-B-C — Dietetics and Home Economics 102-105 



PAGE 

Departments of Instruction and Course Offerings 

Art 106 

Commerce 109 

Dietetics and Home Economics 113 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 116 

Education 118 

Psychology and Philosophy 119 

English 121 

Library Science 126 

Foreign Languages 127 

History and Social Science 132 

Mathematics 139 

Music 140 

Physical and Health Education and Health Service 147 

Science 1 52 

Degrees Conferred June 1944 . 156 

Register of Students 161 

Geographical Distribution of Students 197 

Summary of Enrollment 197 



Correspondence and Visitors 

Communications relative to the administration and general policies 
of the college, inquiries relative to information regarding scholar- 
ships, loan funds, and self help, and requests for catalogues and view- 
books should be addressed to the President of the College. 

Requests for information relative to admission to the freshman 
class, certificates of admission, credits, and transcripts of records 
should be addressed to the Registrar. 

Inquiries relating to admission to advanced standing, to the aca- 
demic work and progress of students in college, to courses of study, 
extension courses, and the Placement Bureau should be addressed to 
the Dean of the College. 

Remittances and correspondence relating to students' accounts, 
etc., should be addressed to the Treasurer. 

Correspondence relative to social regulations and permissions per- 
taining thereto, room assignments, etc., should be addressed to the 
Dean of Women. 

Correspondence relating to the health of the students should be 
addressed to the Resident Physician. 

Visitors are welcome at the college and provision is made for 
guiding them through the buildings and grounds by the Dean of 
Freshmen. The administrative offices of the college are closed from 
one o'clock on Saturday until Monday morning, and members of 
the staff and faculty are not available for interviews during that 
time except by special appointment in advance. The office of the 
Dean of Women is not closed over the week-end. 



The Corporation of the University 



Legal Title: 
"The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia" 

THE RECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY 
Robert Gray Williams 

THE VISITORS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

To February 28, 1946 

Lewis Catlett Williams Richmond 

James Howard Corbitt . Suffolk 

Charles O'Conor Goolrick Fredericksburg 

Edward Clifford Anderson . Richmond 

Maitland H. Bustard Danville 

To February 29, 1948 

Christopher Browne Garnett Arlington 

Robert Gray Williams Winchester 

Edward Reilly Stettinius, Jr Rapidan 

William Dandridge Haden ', Charlottesville 

Richard Carrington Lynchburg 

Mrs. Phoebe Enders Willis Fredericksburg 

Mrs. Bertha P. Wailes Sweet Briar 

*Mrs. Howard Gilmer Pulaski 

Mrs. O. A. Calcott Norfolk 

The President of the University, ex officio University 

The State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction, ex officio Richmond 

•Died February 23, 1945. 



Officers of Administration and Assistants 



John Lloyd Newcomb/B.A., C.E., Sc.D., LL.D Chancellor 

Office of the President 

Morgan L. Combs, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D President 

Estelle P. Derryberry, A.B., M.A Secretary 

Lake Cox, B.S. Assistant Secretary 

Office of the Dean 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D Dean of College 

Virginia Dickinson Morgan, B.S Secretary 

Office of the Registrar 

Louis C. Guenther, A.B., M.A Registrar 

**Nannie Mae M. Williams, B.S., A.M Registrar 

Annabel C. Graves, A.B Assistant Registrar 

Mary Frizzelle Secretary 

Office of the Treasurer 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Treasurer 

Leon Ferneyhough Assistant Treasurer 

Adeline Kirkpatrick, B.S Chief Clerk 

Inez Fell, B.S._ Clerk 

Library 

Carrol H. Quenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D._ -Librarian 

*Bernard Fry, A.B., A.M Assistant Librarian 

Arthur E. Whitenack, B.S., B.S. in L.S., M.A., M.S. 

Head, Circulation Department 

Julia M. Lutz, A.B Cataloguer 

Margaret D. Dickinson, B.S., B.L.S Cataloguer 

**W. Edwin Hemphill, B.A., M.A., Ph.D Archivist 

*Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 
♦♦Absent on leave, 1944-45. 



12 Mary Washington College 

Personnel Department 

Margaret Swander, A.B., M.S Director of Student Personnel 

Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D Assistant 

Student Resident Department 

Mrs. Charles Lake Bushnell, B.A Dean of Women 

Lillie S. Turman, B.S Dean of Freshmen 

*Mrs. Dice R. Anderson, AB., M.A. 

Supervisor of Off-Campus Students 
Margaret Swander, A.B., M.S. 

Acting Supervisor of Off-Campus Students 

Mitchell F. Luck, B.S Secretary to Dean of Women 

Mrs. Rose Mae Derrow Hostess 

Mrs. Cordie E. Miller Hostess 

Mrs. Pearl H. Berry Hostess 

Mrs. Anne S. Fordham Hostess 

Mrs. Thelma Read, A.B Hostess 

Faith E. Johnston, B.S., M.S. 

Supervisor, Home Management House 

Infirmary 

Nancy Whitticar, B.S., M.D Resident Physician 

Elizabeth Trible, R.N Resident Nurse 

Susie Johnson, R.N Assistant Resident Nurse 

Edna Jones, R.N Assistant Resident Nurse 

Dining Halls 

Catherine Turner, B.S., M.A Administrative Dietitian 

Dalia L. Ruff Foods Purchaser and Assistant Dietitian 

Sara G. Taylor, B.S Assistant Dietitian 

Wynn Ogle, B.S. Assistant Dietitian 

Buildings and Grounds 

Eugene Curtis Supt. Buildings and Grounds 

Lefa Faulkner Director of Dormitories 

Thomas J. Honaker Manager of College Shoppe 

Thelma Baughan, B.S Dietitian, College Shoppe 



•Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Officers of Instruction 



John Lloyd Newcomb, B.A., C.E., Sc.D., LL.D Chancellor 

B.A., College of William and Mary; C.E., University of Virginia; 
ScD., Washington and Lee University; LL.D., Duke University, Col- 
lege of William and Mary, George Washington University. 

Morgan L. Combs, A.B., A.M., Ed.M., Ed.D President 

A.B., University of Richmond; A.M., University of Chicago; Ed.M., 
Ed.D., Harvard University; Student, University of Berlin. 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean and Professor of Education 
B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Mary Jane Andrews, M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Health and Physical Education 
M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Elizabeth W. Baker, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Professor of English 

A.B., George Peabody College; A.M., University of Chicago; Graduate 
Student, Columbia University; Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

James W. Blincoe, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Vladimir V. Brenner, O.A.D Professor of Russian 

State Gymnasium of Moscow; Officer of Academic Degree, Military 
Academy, Iver, Russia. 

George Elmer Browne, N.A Professor of Art 

Painter. Member, National Academy of Design, National Institute Art 
and Letters. Represented in permanent collections of Luxembourg Gal- 
lery, Paris, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery, Washington, 
Chicago Art Institute, etc. Chevalier of the French Legion of Honor 
and Officer of Public Instruction and Fine Arts, France. 

Louis J. Cabrera, A.B., M.A., Litt. D. 

Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

A.B., University of Dubuque; M.A., University of Maine; Litt. D., 
Andhra Research University, Vizianagaram, So. India; Graduate Stu- 
dent, Columbia University, University of Perugia, Italy, and University 
of Grenoble, France. 

Hobart C. Carter, B. S., M.A., Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Central Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Missouri. 

William A. Castle, B.S., Ph.D Professor of Biology 

B.S., Denison University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Roy Seldon Cook, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., and Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Oscar Haddon Darter, A.B., A.M Professor of History 

A.B., State Teachers College, Ada, Okla. ; A.M., Columbia University; 
Graduate Student, George Washington University, University of Mich- 
igan, and Peabody College ; Travel and Study in Europe. 



14 Mary Washington College 

Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 
Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University; Stu- 
dent, Lehigh University, University of Pennsylvania, and University 
of California. 

James Harvey Dodd, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. Professor of Commerce 

Graduate, Accounting and Business Administration, Bowling Green 
Business University; A.B., Western Kentucky Teachers College; A.M., 
Ph.D., George Peabody College; Student, Vanderbilt University and 
Northwestern University. 

Raleigh M. Drake, B.B.A., M.A., Ph.D. -Professor of Psychology 
B.B.A., M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., University of London. 

Alice L. Edwards, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. 

Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Oregon State College; Graduate Student, University of California 
and University of Chicago; M.A., Ed.D., Columbia University. 

*Charles H. Frick, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., University of South Carolina ; M.S., Iowa State College ; Graduate 
Student, University of Washington and Duke University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Paul Haensel, B.Com., LL.D., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics 

B.Com., Imperial Moscow Academy of Commerce, Moscow, Russia; 
LL.D., M.A., Ph.D., Imperial Moscow University, Moscow, Russia. 

Robert L. Hilldrup, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

A.B., Southwestern College ; M.A., University of Virginia ; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Hugo Iltis, Ph.D Professor of Biology 

Ph.D., University of Prague; Student, University of Zurich. 

Alma C. Kelly, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Rutgers University; Student, New Haven School of Physiotheraphy ; 
M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

John P. Kirby, B.A., Ph.D Professor of English 

B.A., Hamilton College; Graduate Student, Columbia University; PhJX, 

Yale University. 

Almont Lindsey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D Professor of History 

B.S., Knox College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

♦Charles K. Martin, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. _JProfessor of Education 

A.B., Southwest Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., University of 
Missouri ; Ph.D., Yale University. 



♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Officers of Instruction 15 

Carrol H. Quenzel, B.S., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Library Science 

B.S., M.A., University of West Virginia; B.S. in L.S., University of 
Illinois ; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

George Earlie Shankle, A.B., B.A., M.O., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

A.B., M.O., Union University; B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., 
Ph. D., George Peabody College. 

Milton H. Stansbury, A.B., Ph.D Professor of Spanish 

A.B., Brown University ; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Rollin H. Tanner, A.B., Ph.D. .^Professor of Greek and Latin 

A.B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University; Graduate Stu- 
dent, University of Chicago; Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. -..-Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Mildred McMurtry Bolling, A.B., A.M. 

Associate Professor of French 

A.B,, Colorado College; M.A., University of Missouri; Advanced Study, 
Paris; Graduate Student, University of Chicago and University of 
Colorado. 

Dorothy Duggan, B.S., M.A Associate Professor of Art 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A., in Fine Arts, Peabody College; 
Travel and Study in Europe; Student, Arts Students' League, New 
York City and Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. 

Eva Taylor Eppes, B.S., M.A Associate Professor of Voice 

Graduate in Piano and Harmony, Southern College; Graduate, Cornell 
University Music Department; Voice, Jean Trigg, Richmond, Helen 
. Allen Hunt, Boston, Edouard Albion, Washington, D. C, Isador Luck- 
stone, New York; B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., University of 
Virginia. 

Ronald W. Faulkner, A.B., A.M. Associate Professor of Music 

A.B., A.M., Colorado State College of Education; Institute of Musical 
Art, New York City; Pupil of George Barrere. 

E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M Associate Professor of Education 

A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary; Graduate Study, George 
Washington University. 

Sallie Baird Harrison, B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 
B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., University of Tennessee. 

Lyle S. Hiatt, B.S., B.A Associate Professor of Commerce 

B.S., B.A., University of Florida; Graduate Student, University of 
Florida, Georgetown Law School, American University, George Wash- 
ington University. 



16 Mary Washington College 

*Richard M. Kirby, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Commerce 
A.B., Berea College; A.M., Ohio State University; Graduate Student, 
Univeristy of Chicago; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Clifton B. McIntosh, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Spanish 
A.B., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Frances Ramey Mooney, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Social Science 
B.S., University of Oklahoma; M.A., George Peabody College; Grad- 
uate Student, Clark University, Columbia University, George Washing- 
ton University, University of Southern California, University of Chicago, 
and University of California. 

Robert W. Pyle, B.S., M.A., ?n.Y)._ Associate Professor of Biology 
B.S., M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Harvard University. 

•J. Kenneth Roach, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Commerce 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University; Student, Roanoke 
College, Cornell University. 

*Mildred P. Stewart, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., Columbia University; Student, 
Colorado State College, New School for Social Research, New York 
University, Bennington College. 

George Warren Arms, A.B., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Princeton University; Ph.D., New York University; Student, Uni- 
versity of Zurich and University of Munich. 

*Mary C. Baker, B.S., M.A., Ed.D. 

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., and Ed.D., New York University; Student, University of 
Wisconsin. 

Richard H. Bauer, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 
Ph.B., M.A., and Ph.D., University of Chicago ; Student, Luther Institute. 

Denver Baughan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Roy B. Bowers, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 

A.B., M.A., Carson and Newman College; Graduate Student, Andover- 
Newton, University of Chicago and University of Cincinnati. 



♦Absent on leave, military service. 1944-45. 



Officers of Instruction 17 

Henry Grady Britt, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S., M.A., Wake Forest College; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Herman J. Bryson, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Geology 
A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina. 

A. Aldo Charles, B.S., M.Ed Assistant Professor of Commerce 

B^S., Washington and Lee University; M.Ed., Temple University. 

Lucile H. Charles, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts 

Student, Theatre Guild School for Acting; Ph.B., University of Chicago; 
M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Marion K. Chauncey, B.M., M.A. Assistant Professor of Music 

Graduate, Georgia State Woman's College; B.M. and Violin Diploma, 
Ithaca Conservatory of Music; Student of Cesar Thompson — Belgian 
virtuoso, W. Grant Egbert, and Jean Pulikowski of the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory; M.A., Columbia University; Graduate Student, George 
Washington University and Peabody Conservatory of Music 

Estelle Pitt Derryberry, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce; Graduate Student, Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; M.A., Peabody College. 

Katherine E. Griffith, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

William Wayne Griffith, A.B., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Harvard University; B.S. in 
L.S., Drexel Institute; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

**W. Edwin Hemphill, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney College; M.A., Emory University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Virginia. 

*Anna Scott Hoye, A.B., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
A.B., Lynchburg College; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 

Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; Student, University of Virginia. 



♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 
**Absent on leave, 1944-45. 



18 Mary Washington College 

Faith E. Johnston, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Kansas State Teachers College; M.S., Kansas State College; Stu- 
dent, Colorado State College. 

Eleanor Jones, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 
B.S., M.A., University of Alabama. 

Robert C. Le Clair, B.F.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.F.A., University of Pennsylvania; Student, Oxford University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

William Luther McDermott, B.A.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.A., University of Pitts- 
burgh ; Awards in Sculpture, Beaux Arts Institute of Design, New York. 

Mary E. McKenzie, A.B., M.A. Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.A., Columbia University; Graduate Student, 
George Washington University. 

Fred Earle Miller, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education. 

*Earl G. Nicks, A.B., M.A Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education. 

Alan Stanley Peirce, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
A.B., M.S., and Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Herman R. Reichenbach, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Music 

University of Berlin ; Ph.D., University of Freiburg. 

Paul John Ritter, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts 

A.B., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern 
California. 

Emil R. Schnellock Assistant Professor of Art 

Student, Art Student's League under Robert Henri and George Luks; 
Woodstock Art Colony, New York. 

Helen H. Schultz, B.S., A.M Assistant Professor of Biology 

Special Student, University of Chicago, University of Tennessee, How- 
ard College, University of Colorado; B.S., A.M., George Peabody Col- 
lege; Research Marine Biological Station, Woods Hole, Mass.; Graduate 
Study, George Washington University. 

John A. Spaulding, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Spanish 
A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Officers of Instruction 19 

Myrick Sublette, A.B., LL.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A.B., Indiana State Teachers College; A.M., Ph.D., University of 
Illinois ; LL.B., University of Michigan. 

Margaret Swander, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Guidance and Counseling 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; Graduate Student, University of 
Pittsburgh; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Study, City of London 
Vacation School. 

Lola Minich Tompkins, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Commerce 

A.B., University of Oklahoma; Diploma, Gregg College, Chicago; 
M.A., New York University. 

Catherine Turner, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Winthrop College; M.S., Woman's College of the University of 
North Carolina. 

Robert Carrington Vaden, Jr., A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., College of William and Mary; M.A., University of Virginia. 

* Arthur L. Vogelback, Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Ph.B., Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Harold Weiss, A.B., A.M. Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts 

A.B., A.M., Colorado State College of Education; Graduate Student, 
George Washington University and University of Wisconsin. 

Winifred Templeton Weiss, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Commerce 
A.B., S.W. Missouri State Teachers College; M.A., Columbia University. 

*James Edwin Whitesell, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
A.B., Randolph Macon College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Nancy S. Whitticar, B.S., M.D. 

Resident Physician and Assistant Professor of Hygiene 

B.S., M.D., Ohio State University. Internship at White Cross Hospital, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Elizabeth Wysor Assistant Professor of Voice 

Graduate, Juilliard Graduate School of Music and Staatliche Akademie 
der Tonkunst, Munich, Germany; Study under Paul Bender, Munich, 
and Margaret Matzenauer, Diana d'Este, and Ernst Knoch, New York 
City. Active artist in symphonic, operatic, radio, and concert fields in 
North and South America and Europe. 

♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



20 Mary Washington College 

*Martha Hardy Anderson, A.B., M.A Instructor in English 

A.B., Baylor College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Thelma R. Baughan, B.S Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Memphis State College. 

Neda Bine, B.S., Ed.M Instructor in Commerce 

B.S., Wesleyan College ; Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh. 

*William Brennand -Instructor in Violincello and Contrabass 

Pupil of Joseph Emonts; Assistant First 'Cellist, National Symphony 
Orchestra ; Member Pro Musica Quartette. 

Robert F. Caverlee, A.B., Th.B., Th.M., D.D. 

Instructor in Biblical Literature 

A.B., University of Richmond; Th.B., Th.M., Southern Theological 
Seminary; D.D., University of Richmond. 

*Thomas Cousins Instructor in Brass Instruments 

Pupil of William Vachianno, Juilliard Conservatory; National Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

Margaret. D. Dickinson, B.S. B.L.S. 

Instructor in Library Science 

B.S., Mary Washington College; B.L.S., Library School, George Pea- 
body College. 

*Bernard Fry, A.B., A.M . Instructor in Library Science 

A.B., A.M., Indiana University; Graduate Student, Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. 

Emilie Gaither, B.A., M.A Instructor in Commerce 

Student, University of San Antonio and Texas A. and M. College; B.S., 
University of Texas ; M.A., Columbia University. 

*Robert L. Gasser, B.S Instructor in Brass Instruments 

B.S., University of Denver; Studied with Byron D. Jolivette at Denver 
College of Music and Loyd D. Geisler, National Symphony; Member, 
National Symphony Orchestra. 

Anne F. Hamer, B. Mus Instructor in Piano and 'Cello 

B.Mus., University of Michigan; Teacher's degree, Washington College 
of Music; Pupil of Richard McClanahan, New York City, Joseph Brink- 
man and Hans Pick, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Levin Houston, III, B.A Instructor in Piano 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; Graduate Student, Washington and 
Lee University; Pupil of Ray Lev, Thorvald Otterstrom, Hans Barth, 
Guy Maier, Quincy Cole, and Harold Genther; Composer of distinc- 
tion ; Soloist. 

Charlotte Klein, Mus.D., F.A.G.O. 

Instructor in Organ and Piano 

Mus.D., Boguslawski College of Music, Chicago; Fellow of the Amer- 
ican Guild of Organists; Scholarship-Diploma Graduate in Organ and 
Piano, Peabody Conservatory of Music; Pupil of Widor and Phillip at 
Fontainebleau, France; National Vice-President and Musical Adviser, 
Mu Phi Epsilon, National Music Honor Society. 

•Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Officers of Instruction 21 

Helen Marie Lundgren, B.M.E. -Instructor in Brass Instruments 

B.M.E., Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois; Member, National 
Symphony Orchestra; Trumpet pupil of Renold Schilke, Chicago Sym- 
phony. 

Julia M. Lutz, A.B Instructor in Library Science 

A.B., University of West Virginia; Graduate Student, Columbia Uni- 
versity, University of West Virginia. 

Mary Manter, B.S Instructor in Health and Physical Education 

B.S., University of Wisconsin. 

Sylvia Meyer, B.A Instructor in Harp 

B.A., University of Wisconsin ; Artist Diploma and Teachers Certificate, 
Peabody Conservatory of Music; Pupil of Carlos Salzedo; Solo Harpist, 
National Symphony Orchestra. 

Blanche Price, A.B., A.M Instructor in Home Economics 

A.B., A.M., West Virginia University; Graduate Student, Columbia 
University, University of Pittsburgh, and University of Minnesota. 

Vera Neely Ross, B.M Instructor in Voice 

B.M., University of Kansas; fellowship Juilliard Musical Foundation; 
Graduate School, New York; Pupil, Madame Choen-Rene, Walter 
Golde, and Oscar Seagle; Soloist, Washington, D. C. 

Jane Scranton, B.S., M.S Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Hood College; M.S., Cornell University. 

Jan Tomasow Instructor in Violin 

Pupil of Moscow Conservatory and Carl Flesch in Belgium; Soloist 
with Parish Symphony and Chicago Opera Orchestra ; Concert Tours in 
South America, Mexico, and North America; Concert Master with 
Watergate Symphony; Assistant Concert Master with National Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

Elizabeth Trible, R.N Instructor in Home Nursing 

Mary Washington College; Stuart Circle Hospital, School of Nursing, 
Richmond; Student, School of Nursing, Columbia University. 

William Russell Walther Instructor in Riding 

Director, Oak Hill Stables. 
Hope D. Wells, B.A., B.S Instructor in Health Education 

B.A., B.S., University of Wisconsin. 

Arthur E. Whitenack, B.S., B.S. in L.S., M.A., M.S. 

Assistant Librarian and Instructor in Library Science 

B.S., M.A., Ohio State University; B.S. in L.S., M.S., University of 
Illinois. 

*Donald Ransom Whitney, A.B., A.M. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Oberlin College ; A.M., Princeton University. 
**Nannie Mae M. Williams, B.S., A.M. -Instructor in Psychology 

B.S., Mary Washington College; A.M., George Washington University. 

♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 
**Absent on leave, 1944-45. 



22 Mary Washington College 

Demonstration and Student Teaching 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of College and Director of Teacher-Training 

Fredericksburg Public Schools 

Guy H. Brown, A.B Superintendent of City Schools 

A.B., Roanoke College ; Study, University of Virginia. 

Robert Carrington Vaden, Jr., A.B., M.A. 

Director of Instruction 
A.B., College of William and Mary; M.A., University of Virginia. 

Cora Vaughn Abrams Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Gladys Marian Alrich, B.A., M.A Supervisor 

B.A., M.A., Stetson University ; Study, University of Virginia. 

Frances Liebenow Armstrong, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Katherine Micks Bernard, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Elizabeth Faulkner Brent, B.A., M.A Supervisor 

B.A., Hollins College; M.A., Columbia University; Study, Mary Wash- 
ington College. 

Elizabeth Stone Courtney Supervisor 

University of Virginia; Columbia University; Mary Washington Col- 
lege. 

Leslie Marguerite Crumley, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Kathryn Jones Cueman, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Catharine Ida Dawson, A.B., B.S., M.A Supervisor 

A.B., University of Richmond; B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., 
Middlebury College ; Study, University of Maryland. 

Alice Perkins Dew, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Carolyn Dalton Dickenson, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Dorothy Dickinson, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Emma Owens Euliss, B.S '. Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 



Officers of Instruction 23 

Nannie Walker Goodloe, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Mary Payne Gordon, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Study, Columbia University. 

Mary Virginia Gouldman, B.A Supervisor 

B.A., College of William and Mary; Study, Mary Washington College. 

Laura Frances Harris, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College; Study, University of Virginia. 

Goldie Sager Harvey, B.S., M.A Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College ; M.A., Columbia University. 

Josephine Boswell Inskeep, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Ethel Barrowman Jones, B.A., B.S Supervisor 

B.A., Dickinson College; B.S., Richmond Professional Institute; Study, 
University of North Carolina. 

Kate Judy Keckler, B.A Supervisor 

B.A., Western College ; Study, Mary Washington College. 

Alma Keel, B.A Supervisor 

B.A., Fredericksburg College; Study, Mary Washington College and 
Appalachia State Teachers College. 

Edith N. Kellar Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Josephine Reasor Laningham, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Study, Cincinnati Conservatory of 
Music. 

Mildred Jamison Lapsley, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Mary Baldwin College; Study, University of Virginia. 

Nell Gertrude Lemley, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., West Virginia University. 

Eudora Armstrong McCleary, B.S : Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Pauline McGhee • Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

John B. Madden, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Slippery Rock State Teachers College. 

Josephine M. Miller, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Manchester College ; Study, Peabody College. 

Genevieve Moseley, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College. 



24 Mary Washington College 

Ethel Hester Nash, B.S., M.A Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Study, University of Virginia; M.A., 
Columbia University. 

Virginia Nash Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Robert Bruce, Neill, B.S., M.S Supervisor 

B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Study, Mary Washington 
College, University of Virginia. 

Elnora Mary Overley, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Anne Marye Owen, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Flora MacDonald College; Study, College of William and Mary; 
University of Virginia, University of North Carolina. 

Deborah White Owen, A.B Supervisor 

A.B., Winthrop College ; Study, Mary Washington College. 

Lillian Toombs Poff, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., University of Virginia. 

Lorene Moffette Potter, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Loula Williams Rawlings Supervisor 

Mary Washington College. 

Helen Reynolds Reamy, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College ; Study, Columbia University. 

Esther Rowe, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Margaret Elinor Rowell, A.B., M.A Supervisor 

A.B., Lynchburg College; M.A., Peabody College; Study, American 
Institute of Normal Methods. 

Katy Friel Sanders, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Peabody College; Study, Farmville State Teachers College, Stout 
Institute. 

Arthur H. Schwartz, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Stout Institute; Study, University of Tennessee. 

Florence Baptist Scott, B.S. Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Helen Florence Shelton Supervisor 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute ; Farmville State Teachers College. 

Sarah Calvert Spillman, B. S., M.A Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Elizabeth Lewes Stearns, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 



Officers of Instruction 25 

Emeline Lee Stearns, B.A., M.A Supervisor 

B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., University of Chicago; Study 
Cornell University, Harvard University, and Columbia University. 

S. Elizabeth Truitt, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Farmville State Teachers College; Study, College of William and 
Mary. 

Nancy Elma Wilson Supervisor 

Radford College; University of New York; Mary Washington College. 

Home Economics Training Centers 

Sallie Baird Harrison, B.S., M.S. 
Supervisor of Student Teaching in Home Economics 

Fredericksburg — James Monroe High School 

Roberta T. Short, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., University of Wisconsin. 

Caroline County — Central High School 

Mary Porterfield, B.S Resident Teacher 

B.S., Radford State Teacher College. 

Cooperating Schools In Apprentice Teaching 
and In-Service Training 

E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M. 

Director of Apprentice Teaching and In-Service 
Training in Cooperating Schools 
A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary. 

Alexandria City 

Martha Rinsland, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Supervisor 

B.S., M.S., Ed.D., University of Oklahoma. 

Catherine Jenkins, B.S Participating Teacher 

Beulah Spain Lockheart, B.S Participating Teacher 

Mary Buckley, B.S Participating Teacher 

Martha Rinsland, B.S., M.S., Ed.D Participating Teacher 

Julia Whaley, B.S.___ Participating Teacher 

Richmond City 

Annie H. Sutton, A.B., M.A Supervisor 

A.B., College of William and Mary; M.A., Columbia University. 

Eleanor Douthat, B.A Participating Teacher 

Louise Baker, B.S., M.A Participating Teacher 



26 Mary Washington College 

Nell Binford, B.S., M.A Participating Teacher 

Marion Nesbitt, B.S., M.A Participating Teacher 

Frances Walker, B.S., M.A Participating Teacher 

Mildred Wingfield Participating Teacher 

Stafford County 

Ann E. Moncure, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Mary Washington College. 

Elizabeth Thorburn Participating Teacher 

Fairfax County 

James E. Bauserman, B.S Supervisor 

B.S., Madison College. 



Alumnae Association 27 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Mary Washington College has a large and active Alumnae Asso- 
ciation with members scattered over the United States and in some 
foreign countries. Many of them have achieved distinction in the 
fields of Art, Music, Literature, Business, Social Work, and Educa- 
tion. At present some of the alumnae are holding important govern- 
ment positions and many are engaged in active war work. 

The purpose of the organization is to stimulate good fellowship 
among the members and promote the welfare of the college and its 
alumnae by increasing the interest of its members in the college and 
each other. 

Officers 

President Mrs. Camilla Moody Payne 

5809 14th St., N.W., Washington 11, D. C. 

Vice-President Miss Juliet Ware 

Monroe Terrace Apts., 801 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

Secretary Miss Jane McCorkindale 

713 Maiden Lane, Roanoke 15, Va. 

Treasurer Miss Martha Swoope 

110 Broadway, Roanoke, Va. 

Faculty Adviser Miss Mary McKenzie 

1410 College Avenue, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Directors 

Miss Anna Mae Harris, Lignum, Va. 
Miss Mildred Chase Twyford, Onancock, Va. 
Mrs. Louise O. Graves, Fredericksburg, Va. 
Miss Clara Richards, Newport News, Va. 
Mrs. Walter F. Beverly, Richmond, Va. 
Miss Martha Swoope, Roanoke, Va. 
Miss June Stoll, Arlington, Va. 



General Information 



History of the College 

Mary Washington is the Woman's College of the University of 
Virginia and is an integral part of the University system. The college 
became affiliated with the University by Act of the General Assembly 
of Virginia February 12, 1944, with the legal title "Mary Washing- 
ton College of the University of Virginia" and is under the control 
of the Rector and Visitors of the University. 

The name of the institution has real historical significance and 
background combined with intimate local associations, since the col- 
lege is located on a hill overlooking the home and tomb of Mary 
Washington ; the boyhood home of her illustrious son, George Wash- 
ington; and Kenmore, the home of her daughter, Betty Washington 
Lewis, and the campus was at one time a part of the Lewis estate. 
No more appropriate name could have been given a woman's college, 
and it should serve as an inspiration to young womanhood and a 
standard of excellence for ages yet to come. 

The development of Mary Washington College has been phe- 
nomenal, especially during the past ten or twelve years. It is the 
largest college for women in the State, has a national reputation, 
and draws its students from almost every state of the Union, the ter- 
ritories, and some foreign countries. 

Purpose 

The purpose of the college is to provide for women educational 
opportunities comparable to those provided for men in the University 
at Charlottesville. 

Although originally the main purpose was that of educating teach- 
ers for the public schools, Mary Washington has developed into a 
distinguished liberal arts college. While the emphasis is upon the 
liberal arts, music, and the other fine arts, courses in Home Eco- 
nomics, Commerce, Physical Education, and other specialized fields 
are offered. 



Location and Environment 29 

Location and Environment 

Mary Washington College is ideally located amidst the finest tra- 
ditions of old Virginia, almost in the shadow of the Nation's Capital, 
and accessible to the great centers of culture of the East. The en- 
vironment is both inspiring and romantic because of its colorful past 
and the peculiar blending of the life of early Colonial days with the 
life of today. 

Here you may spend your college days where you can look down 
upon the boyhood home of George Washington; the home of his 
sister; the home and tomb of his mother; and within a few minutes 
drive of Wakefield, his birthplace, and of Mount Vernon, the home 
of his mature years. 

The college is noted for the natural beauty of the grounds and 
impressive classical architecture. The campus, comprising eighty 
acres, is situated on the famous Marye's Heights, overlooking the 
historic City of Fredericksburg, and commanding a panoramic view 
of the beautiful Rappahannock River Valley. The position of the 
buildings gives them a commanding appearance, bringing out in 
strong relief the classic beauty of the architecture. In the rear of the 
campus, deep wooded ravines, threaded by crystal streams add a pic- 
turesqueness to the college grounds. The setting, campus, and build- 
ings possess a singular charm and appeal. 

The stately colonial pillars, the rolling shady lawns, and the hal- 
lowed traditions which cluster about the place are vividly reminiscent 
of the gracious charm, culture, and romance of the Old South. In 
these idyllic surroundings, college days pass all too quickly. 

Historic Fredericksburg 

Fredericksburg and vicinity have played an important role in every 
critical and momentous period of American History from the time 
Captain John Smith and his intrepid followers sailed up the Rappa- 
hannock River in 1608 until the present, and is known as "America's 
Most Historic City." 

On the heights where Mary Washington College now stands, 
once stood "Seacobeck," an Indian village, visited by Captain Smith 
and his party. 

Fredericksburg furnished the Commander-in-Chief of the Army 
and the Admiral and Founder of the American Navy during the 
Revolutionary War, George Washington and John Paul Jones. In 



30 Mary Washington College 

addition to the Commanders, it furnished six other Generals, Hugh 
Mercer, Thomas Posey, George Rogers Clark, William Woodford, 
George Weedon, and Gustavus B. Wallace. 

James Madison, President of the United States and Father of 
the Constitution, was born within twenty miles of the city. Thomas 
Jefferson, the author of the Declaration of Independence, wrote the 
"Act Establishing Religious Liberty in Virginia" in 1775, in Fred- 
ericksburg. This section of Virginia furnished the Presidents of the 
United States for thirty-two years during the most trying and difficult 
period of the history of the Republic. Fredericksburg was the home 
of James Monroe, President of the United States and author of the 
Monroe Doctrine. It was George Mason of an adjoining county 
who wrote the "Virginia Bill of Rights," and the "Constitution of 
Virginia." 

Here lived General Lewis Littlepage, protege of John Jay at the 
court of France, member of the Cabinet of the King of Poland, and 
emissary to Russia. His tomb is in Freedericksburg. Other notable 
characters who were born or lived in Fredericksburg were John 
Forsythe, Governor of Louisiana, Minister to Spain, and Secretary 
of State; Governor Alexander Spotswood of the Knights of the 
Golden Horseshoe; Chief Surgeon Laurens Brooke, who sailed with 
John Paul Jones on the "Ranger" and the "Bon Homme Richard"; 
Moncure D. Conway, famous writer; Commodore Theodore R. 
Rootes, Captain Joseph N. Barry, Commander George Minor, and 
Colonel Richard D. Maury, all of whom distinguished themselves 
in the Confederate Navy; Captain Thom, Commander of the famous 
Merrimac in the battle of Hampton Roads; Robert Brooke, Governor 
of Virginia and Attorney General ; John Taylor, United States Sena- 
tor from Virginia, writer, and world famous agriculturist; and Gari 
Melchers, internationally known artist. 

Famous scientists include Matthew F. Maury, the "Pathfinder 
of the Seas"; Captain Lynch, United States Navy, famous for his 
scientific work in connection with the topography of the "Dead Sea 
Valley"; Rear-Admiral Griffin, Chief of Bureau of Naval Engineer- 
ing and inventor of the electric drive and the turbine gear; and 
Tom Armat, who invented an important phase of the motion picture, 
and whose patent was later purchased by Edison. 

Among the notable women from Fredericksburg were Susan 
Metcalf Savage, early missionary to Africa; Ellen Lewis Herndon, 
wife of President Chester A. Arthur; Martha Stevens of Civil War 



Historic Fredericksburg 31 

fame; Mary Washington, Mother of George Washington; Mary 
Custis, wife of General Robert E. Lee; and Kate Waller Barrett, 
internationally known sociologist and educator. 

Space does not permit mentioning all of the famous men and 
women who were born in Fredericksburg or whose lives were closely 
associated with the community. 

The following are some of the places in full view of the college 
visited by thousands of people from all over America and from foreign 
countries, every year: The boyhood home of George Washington, 
where he cut the cherry tree; the home and burial place of his 
mother; "Kenmore," the home of his sister, Betty Washington Lewis; 
"Chatham," so long associated with romance and war, the head- 
quarters of the commander of the Army of the Potomac, the favorite 
visiting place of George Washington; where Count Zeppelin, an 
attache of the Northern Army, sent up a balloon at the Battle of 
Fredericksburg for observation purposes. 

Also, the first Apothecary Shop in America; the old slave block; 
the home of Matthew Fontaine Maury; the Rising Sun Tavern, 
built by Charles, the brother of George Washington ; National Cem- 
etery, where sleep not less than 15,000 Northern soldiers of the 
War Between the States who lost their lives on adjacent battle- 
fields; Confederate Cemetery where rests the remains of 5,000 sol- 
diers; "Brompton," the headquarters for the Confederates; "Green- 
way," General Burnside's headquarters; Wallace Hill, where Lincoln 
reviewed his troops; the law office of James Monroe; historic Fal- 
mouth, the site of a prison camp during the Revolutionary War, and 
the home of the first millionaire in America. 

The old Sunken Road at the base of the heights in front of the 
college campus; the Confederate Cemetery at the foot of the hill; 
the breastworks and gun emplacements on the crest of the hill; and 
the cannon balls and other relics that are found from time to time, 
constitute mute but eloquent testimony of the two sanguinary battles 
which were staged on the heights now occupied by the campus, during 
the War Between the States. 

The United States Government has established a Battlefield Park 
in the Fredericksburg area, and has spent large sums suitably mark- 
ing its battlefields — Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court 
House, Salem Church, and Fredericksburg. 

Considering its historical significance, and the fact that it is 
situated in one of the most accessible and cultural communities in 
America, it would be difficult to find a more fitting place for a col- 



32 Mary Washington College 

lege or an environment more stimulating. Here the old and the new 
are happily blended into a progressive and interesting community of 
more than ten thousand people, surrounded by historic shrines and 
crowned by a halo of golden memories capable of inspiring all who 
enter its gates. 

*Field Trips and Tours 

In an effort to utilize the rich historic environment in which this 
institution is located, and as an integral part of the program of 
instruction, the college sponsors regular visits or pilgrimages to the 
many local shrines and places of interest and note, including those 
in the immediate vicinity of Fredericksburg, the cities of Washington, 
Richmond, and other places accessible to the college. The heads of 
the various departments of instruction have charge of the tours with 
which each department is concerned. These trips are arranged for 
afternoons and Saturdays when they do not interfere with classroom 
work. The department head or teacher in charge of a group makes 
assignments in advance bearing on the particular places to be visited, 
so that students will be familiar with the history or events connected 
with any given place. A lecture covering the history and significance 
of the particular place or shrine visited is given on the grounds. 

These trips are not confined to historic places alone, but include 
visits to industrial and educational institutions as well as visits to 
Congress, State Legislature, Congressional Library, State Library, 
and other governmental departments in Washington and Richmond. 

Every student sometime during her stay at this institution has an 
opportunity of visiting all of the most outstanding and notable places 
to be found within a radius of fifty miles of Fredericksburg. This 
phase of the program of studies is a rich education within itself, and 
furnishes students a background of information which not only enables 
them to appreciate our history and institutions, but which serves also 
as an inspiration. Students eagerly look forward to these trips and 
they serve to vitalize and motivate the work in history, art, music, 
science, commerce, and other departments of the college. 



*Note. — Field trips and tours to distant points necessarily will be cur- 
tailed for the duration in order that Mary Washington College may cooperate 
to the fullest extent in the War effort. However, almost every inch of Fred- 
ericksburg and adjacent territory has historical significance, and the oppor- 
tunity to visit the many shrines and historic places within walking distance of 
the campus is a great privilege which the college students still may enjoy. 



Buildings and Accommodations 33 

Accessibility and Transportation 

Because of its central location, midway between Washington, 

D. C, and Richmond, and its excellent transportation facilities, 
Fredericksburg is one of the most accessible cities in Virginia. 

This college is nearer the Capital of the Nation and the Capital 
of the State than any other State College, which makes it possible 
for students to take advantage of the libraries, art galleries, theatres, 
and other educational facilities in Washington and Richmond. 

Climate and Health 

Fredericksburg enjoys a delightful climate. Its latitude and 
proximity to the Chesapeake Bay and the ocean insure cool breezes in 
summer and a mild climate in winter. The winters are short and 
seldom are the days that are too cold for outdoor sports. 

There is an ample supply of pure water, and not only the college 
but the entire community has a superior health record. 

Buildings and Accommodations 
Residence Halls 

All of the residence halls provide ample and comfortable housing 
facilities. Every room is an outside room with ample ventilation and 
light, single beds, built-in closets and bookcases, and hot and cold 
water in every room. The seven newer buildings afford every con- 
venience and comfort — apartments, suites, a limited number of single 
rooms, private baths, circulating ice water, beautifully appointed 
drawing rooms, comfortable lounge rooms, large porches and arcades, 
pressing rooms, kitchenettes, shower baths, incineration, etc: 

Westmoreland Hall. — Named for a neighboring county, the 
birthplace of George Washington, Robert E. Lee, James Monroe, 
and many other prominent men whose names are interwoven with 
American History. This is the newest dormitory on the campus and 
is occupied by seniors. 

Mary Ball Hall. — Named in honor of Mary, the Mother of 
George Washington. Her home and tomb, the home of her daughter, 
and the boyhood home of her illustrious son are in Fredericksburg 
and in full view of the campus. 

Mary Curtis Hall. — Named in honor of the wife of Robert 

E. Lee, whose home was at Chatham, in Fredericksburg. 



34 Mary Washington College 

Dolly Madison Hall. — Named in honor of the wife of Presi- 
dent James Madison. The latter was born within twenty miles of 
Fredericksburg, and his life was closely associated with the com- 
munity. 

Virginia Hall. — Named for the Commonwealth of Virginia. 

Frances Willard Hall. — Named in honor of Frances E. Wil- 
lard, the great temperance leader and Christian scholar. 

Betty Lewis Hall. — Named in honor of Betty, sister of 
George Washington, whose home, Kenmore, is in Fredericksburg 
and in full view of the campus. 

Cornell Hall. — Located on Cornell Street near the main en- 
trance to the campus. Completed during summer, 1940. Accom- 
modates approximately ninety students. 

Hamlet House. — Named in honor of William N. Hamlet, 
who was connected with the institution for thirty years. 

Marye Hall. — Built after the style of an old southern man- 
sion and stands on the most beautiful site on the campus. 

Other Buildings 

George Washington Hall. — Administration building, named 
in honor of General George Washington, whose life was so closely 
associated with Fredericksburg and this immediate section of Vir- 
ginia. The building was completed in 1939 at a cost of $365,000. 

This is the largest and most imposing structure on the campus, 
and contains the administrative offices; departmental offices; a few 
classrooms; music practice rooms; and a broadcasting studio which 
is fitted with the best in recording equipment, and is wired directly 
to the local studio so that programs can be transmitted to state and 
national hook-ups. Other facilities include a speech clinic; person- 
ality development clinic; large recreation room; and a roof garden. 

This building also contains an auditorium with a seating ca- 
pacity of 1624; dressing and make-up rooms; etc. The stage is fully 
equipped with the most modern devices for handling stage scenery and 
settings, and is planned to take care of the most elaborate programs. 

In addition, a fine pipe organ which is the generous gift of Mr. 
Benj. T. Pitts, of Fredericksburg, and a fully equipped projection 
room for the exhibition of motion pictures, are provided. 



Buildings and Accommodations 35 

E. Lee Trinkle Library. — This building was completed in 
1941 at a cost in excess of $225,000, and provides stacks and other 
facilities for 150,000 volumes. The Library contains five main read- 
ing rooms. Five floors of all-metal stacks house the general book 
collection. It also contains classrooms for instruction in library science 
and the Mendel Museum, in addition to well-equipped offices and 
workrooms. 

The paneled Browsing Room with comfortable chairs and 
lounges and a large fireplace, the Periodical Room, and the Virginia 
Room combine to make this one of the most delightful places at the 
college for relaxation and reflection as well as study. 

The Library is named in memory of the late E. Lee Trinkle, 
former Governor of Virginia and for many years President of the 
Governing Board of the college. 

In addition to the splendid college library on the campus, the 
Congressional Library and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Wash- 
ington, and the State Library and City Library in Richmond provide 
added opportunities for those interested in research. 

Monroe Hall. — Named in honor of President James Monroe, 
who lived in Fredericksburg and whose life was closely identified 
with the community. This building contains classrooms; the little 
theatre, with a seating capacity of 632, equipped with pipe organ; 
gymnasium; and a few departmental offices. 

Chandler Hall. — Science hall, named in memory of Algernon 
B. Chandler, Junior, who was President of the college from 1919 
until his death in 1928. 

The first unit of this structure was erected in 1928-29. During 
1938-39 this building was completed, the first unit renovated, and 
the whole structure changed inside and out. The laboratories for 
home economics, dietetics, biology, bacteriology, chemistry, and physics 
are located in this building in addition to a number of lecture rooms 
and classrooms, student and faculty lounge rooms, and the College 
Shoppe. 

Seacobeck Hall. — This building stands on the site of an In- 
dian village of the Seacobeck tribe, visited by Captain John Smith 
and his party in 1608. This is one of the most beautiful buildings 
on the campus, and contains dining halls, kitchen, lounge room, etc. 
It is a large, airy, well-ventilated building, with the most modern 
equipment, including its own refrigeration plant. 



36 Mary Washington College 

Student Activities Building. — Built from contributions from 
the alumnae and other friends of the college. 

Infirmary. — This important unit of the college is located near 
the center of the campus, is well-equipped, and in charge of a full- 
time resident woman physician and three full-time trained nurses. 

Home Management House. — A home adjoining the college 
grounds has been equipped to give seniors in home economics prac- 
tice in every detail of housekeeping and home-making, in purchasing 
provisions, planning, cooking, and serving meals, cleaning and caring 
for the house, and keeping accounts. 

Central Power and Laundry Building. — This building con- 
tains the heating plant, transformers, and a well-equipped steam 
laundry. A large greenhouse, covering almost the entire top of this 
building, adds much to the facilities of the Department of Biology 
and, in addition, furnishes flowers for the college. 

Amphitheatre. — Located on the natural slope of a hill in the 
midst of a dense grove of trees. Has a seating capacity of approxi- 
mately 1,800, a large stage, dressing rooms, and a specially designed 
lighting system. 

Cabin. — A rustic camp, including cabin, with stone fireplace, 
electric lights, running water, and all conveniences, situated on a 
high hill, in a remote section of the campus, overlooking the recrea- 
tional grounds. 

President's Home. — Located on an eminence just south of 
main campus, overlooking the City of Fredericksburg. 

College Recreational Center 

In the midst of the National Battlefield Park, not far away yet 
seemingly miles from the bustle of the city, is situated a large tract 
of wooded land filled with streams, ravines, wild flowers, and wild 
life. This tract is the gift of Mrs. W. N. Hamlet and her husband, 
the late Professor Hamlet, to the college, and is to serve as a memo- 
rial to both of them. 

Trails will be made and timber cut in preparation for cabins, 
recreational halls, etc., as soon as conditions will permit. The place 
is to serve as a recreational center for the college, as well as an 
arboretum, a wild flower preserve, and a game sanctuary. 



Buildings and Accommodations 37 

Other Facilities 

This is a delightful place in which to spend one's college days. 
The social and recreational opportunities and facilities are excep- 
tional — spacious campus, beautiful groves, two roof gardens, large 
recreation halls, commodious indoor and outdoor swimming pools, 
picturesque golf course on campus, amphitheatre, sound motion pic- 
tures, tennis courts, gymnasium, athletic fields, saddle horses, rustic 
camp with cabin including all conveniences, and farm within easy 
distance of the college on which cabins, a large recreational hall, 
and other facilities will be erected. In addition, there are formal 
receptions and dinners, teas, formal and informal entertainment, 
tours, etc. A delightful home atmosphere adds to the contentment 
and happiness of the student body. 

College Shoppe. — The College Shoppe is located in Chandler 
Hall, and is a combination store and tearoom. The tearoom section 
contains a large soda fountain and serves plate lunches, sandwiches, 
etc. The store section handles all books and classroom supplies, an 
extensive line of college jewelry, cosmetics, room decorations, and 
other accessories. 

The red and black leather booths around the walls, the lunch 
tables in the center, the radio and nickelodeon, and the privilege of 
dancing there with approved dates on designated evenings, all go to 
make this a popular meeting place for students and faculty alike. 

Riding. — The college provides expert riding instruction and 
an ample number of saddle horses. The Oak Hill Riding Academy, 
containing clubhouse, the riding ring, and stables, stands in a dense 
grove of trees near the campus. Extensive shaded bridle trails wind 
through a rolling countryside. 

The Riding Club sponsors four horseshows a year, three small 
shows and a large show in the spring. 

Training Schools 

The college is fortunate in having located almost at its front 
door the splendid schools of the City of Fredericksburg, which are 
used for student teaching, observation, and demonstration work by 
the college through a cooperative program. 

The city school plant is large, modern, well-equipped, and has 
a staff of experienced and well trained instructors. In addition to 



38 Mary Washington College 

classrooms and laboratories, the buildings contain an auditorium 
with a seating capacity of 1,000, gymnasium, cafeteria, workrooms, 
and an excellent library which affords a wide range of reading and 
study material for both students and supervisors. The school grounds 
are provided with a stadium and ample playground facilities. 

Post Office 

The College Station, a branch of the Fredericksburg Post Office, 
located just across the street from the main campus, was established 
for the convenience of Mary Washington College. Similar service 
is provided here as is found at the main post office in the city. 

Mary Washington Hospital 

The Mary Washington Hospital, a private institution, located 
in the City of Fredericksburg and convenient to the college, is well 
equipped and in charge of a splendid staff of specialists. Here students 
may secure the services of widely recognized physicians and surgeons 
in cases of severe illness or emergencies. 

Lyceum Series 

Each year the college provides a Lyceum Series featuring out- 
standing artists. These numbers are held in the beautiful auditorium 
of George Washington Hall with the students as guests of the college. 

The Lyceum Program for 1944-45 included Ruth Draper, 
monologist; Elizabeth Wysor, contralto, and Ivan Petroff, baritone, 
in a joint concert; Argentinita and her Spanish dancers and musi- 
cians; "Porgy and Bess," the Gershwin- Hey ward opera with New 
York company and Alexander Smallens as musical director; the 
Cleveland Symphony Orchestra, Carmen, and others. 



Admission and Expenses 



Admission 



For admission to Mary Washington College the general re- 
quirements are as follows: 

1. Scholastic Preparation. — 

(a) The applicant must be a graduate of an accredited or ap- 
proved public or private high or secondary school, with the 
grade required by that school for recommendation for col- 
lege work. 

Preference is given to students ranking in the upper 
third of their graduating classes. However, a careful analy- 
sis is made by the Committee on Admissions of the high 
school transcripts and certificates of all applicants for admis- 
sion, and each application is considered upon its individual 
merits. Factors other than scholarship, such as personality, 
character, earnestness of purpose, and general background, 
are given due consideration. 

(b) Applicants who are not graduates of accredited high schools 
are required to pass a college entrance examination. For 
admission by examination, the applicant should write to the 
Dean of the College and make preliminary arrangements 
for the examination before leaving home. 

(c) Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age may 
be admitted as special students without satisfying the usual 
entrance requirements, provided they give evidence of serious 
purpose and show adequate preparation for the courses they 
desire to enter. Special students are not permitted to become 
candidates for a degree until all admission requirements for 
the degree have been fully met. Entrance deficiencies may 
be met by summer school work, by private study and exami- 
nation, or by taking beginning courses in college. Courses 
used for meeting entrance deficiencies cannot later be 
counted on a degree. 



40 Mary Washington College 

2. Character, Personality, and Interests. — A recommendation of 
character and personality by the school principal, including in- 
formation about the student's interests, attitudes, and habits as a 
member of her school community, is required. Provision for this 
information is made on the reverse side of the certificate form. 

3. Health. — Each student is examined by the medical staff of the 
college during the first week of the session. This examination 
is an important part of the admission requirements. 

Directions for Admission 

All high schools listed as accredited or approved by the state 
departments of education of their respective states are recognized 
by the college as accredited schools. A certificate from the principal 
of such a school, filled out on the form provided by this college, is 
accepted as sufficient evidence of the completion of the courses re- 
ported therein. 

Upon request to the Registrar, an Application for Admission, 
including the certificate above referred to, will be sent. 

Pages one and two of this form should be filled in by the ap- 
plicant and signed by the applicant and her parent or guardian. Pages 
three and four are to be filled in by the principal of the school from 
which the applicant has graduated or expects to graduate, and the 
completed form returned by the principal directly to the Registrar. 
Do not detach the principal's certificate. 

Remittance of $10.00 to cover room reservation fee (read Room 
Reservation Fee, page 43, carefully) should be sent to the Registrar 
by the applicant. 

No applicant can be considered for admission by the Com- 
mittee on Admissions until the completed Application for Admis- 
sion, including the principal's certificate, and the room reservation 
fee have been received. 

If the applicant is accepted by the Committee on Admissions 
and dormitory facilities are still available, the room reservation fee 
of $10.00 will be retained and she will be notified of her acceptance 
and that a room reservation has been made for her. 

If the applicant is not found eligible for admission or if dormi- 
tory facilities are not available at the time her application is ap- 
proved, the fee of $10.00 will be returned. 



Expenses 41 

Since the total number of boarding students is limited by the 
physical capacity of the college, and hundreds of applicants are unable 
to secure dormitory accommodations each year, it is suggested that 
all papers in connection with admission requirements be secured from 
the Registrar, Mary Washington College, preferably by April 1, and 
returned properly completed, with remittance of $10.00 to cover 
room reservation fee, at the earliest date possible. 

Advanced Standing 

A candidate for admission to advanced standing from an insti- 
tution of collegiate rank may receive credit for work completed there 
subject to the following conditions: 

1. She must present a certificate from the institution from which 
she comes showing her entrance credits at that institution; her 

. college record, including grade of scholarship attained in each 
subject taken; and honorable dismissal. 

A student required to withdraw from another college on 
account 6f poor scholarship may not register here except with 
similar status and under like conditions imposed by the college 
from which she was required to withdraw. However each case 
is considered upon its individual merits. 

2. She must spend at least three quarters in residence at Mary 
Washington College before receiving a degree. 

3. She must satisfy the entrance requirements of Mary Washington 
College, using her advanced credits for this purpose if necessary. 

4. Credit is allowed only for work equivalent to courses in Mary 
Washington College. 

5. Credit for such courses is tentative, must be regarded as provi- 
sional at the time of the applicant's admission to college, and 
will not be considered as final, nor will the applicant be given 
final class rating until she has satisfactorily completed at least 
one quarter's work at Mary Washington College. 

Expenses 

The college is organized on the quarter basis, and is open the 
year round. Any three quarters constitute a year's work whether 
taken consecutively or not. See College Calendar in front of cata- 
logue. 



42 Mary Washington College 

Expenses for Residents of Virginia 
No tuition fee is charged residents of Virginia. 

For a For a Session 

Quarter (Three Quarters) 

General college fees 1 $ 36.00 $108.00 

Library fee 3.00 9.00 

Table board 75.00 225.00 

Room, heat, light, laundry, medical 

service, entertainment 30.00 90.00 



$144.00 $432.00 

Expenses for Non-Residents of Virginia 

For a For a Session 

Quarter (Three Quarters) 

Tuition $ 40.00 $120.00 

General college fees 36.00 108.00 

Library fee 3.00 9.00 

Table board 75.00 225.00 

Room, heat, light, laundry, medical 

service, entertainment 30.00 90.00 



$184.00 $552.00 

Expenses for Off-Campus Students 

(This includes all students not living in college dormitories.) 

For a For a Session 

Quarter (Three Quarters) 

Tuition (non- Virginians) $ 40.00. $120.00 

General college fees 36.00 108.00 

Library fee 3.00 9.00 

Table board optional in College dining 

halls 75.00 225.00 

Medical and Infirmary Fee. — Off-campus students are en- 
titled to the services of the* college medical and nursing staff upon 
payment of a medical fee of $2.00 a quarter, payable in advance, 
which covers office calls and treatment for slight illnesses or minor 
accidents. In case of confinement to the Infirmary, there is an addi- 
tional charge of $1.00 a day, payable on leaving the Infirmary, to 
cover board and room service. Students not living in their own 
homes will find this service indispensable. 



Room Reservation Fee 43 

Virginia Students 

Any minor is classified as a Virginia student whose supporting 
parent resides in Virginia and does business there. The residence 
of anyone twenty-one years of age is determined by where her home 
is at the time of her entrance in college. A declaration of intention 
to reside in Virginia is not sufficient unless the person has voted and 
does vote in the State, and is a regular Virginia taxpayer. 

Part-Time and Evening School Students 

For part-time and evening school students carrying less than 
eight quarter hours of work, the charge is $10.00 a quarter for one 
course carrying credit not exceeding three quarter hours, and $4.00 
for each additional quarter hour. 

Room Reservation Fee 

A room deposit fee of $10.00 must accompany the completed 
Application for Admission if an applicant desires to make room 
reservation in one of the dormitories. Room reservation will be 
made when this fee and all necessary papers have been received and 
approved provided dormitory facilities are still available. 

This fee is retained by the college until the end of the session 
as a guarantee of the proper care of room, furnishings, and other 
college property, at which time the whole or such part of it as may 
be due will be returned. As far as possible, all damage to buildings 
or equipment will be repaired at the expense of students causing such 
damage. Each occupant of a room is held responsible for the care 
and preservation of the same. 

This room reservation fee of $10.00 is a deposit entirely separate 
from other fees and, since it must be retained during the session, 
cannot be deducted from fees due on entrance to the college. 

In the event a student does not meet the requirements of the 
college for admission or there is no available space in the dormitories 
at the time her application is approved, this fee will be returned. 

This reservation fee will be returned if a student cancels 
her room reservation before August 1st, but will be forfeited 
if she cancels after that date, fails to occupy the room, or 
withdraws before the end of the session. 



44 Mary Washington College 

Since dormitory accommodations and approved homes in the 
community are limited, making it necessary to deny admission to 
hundreds of applicants each year, it is advisable to comply with the 
requirements for admission (see Directions for Admission, page 40) 
as far in advance of the opening of the session as is practicable. 

Terms of Payment 

All fees, room rent, and board are payable in advance by the 
quarter. The most satisfactory procedure is to arrange payment by 
mail before entering the college. It is advisable to attend to this 
by September 10 or earlier, if possible, to avoid the rush that precedes 
registration. 

Students holding scholarships, working positions, or loan awards 
are required to pay all fees less the value of the scholarship, loan, 
etc., that they hold. 

Students will not be allowed to attend classes until their regis- 
tration cards have been approved by the Treasurer's office, and such 
approval will be given only after satisfactory financial arrangements 
have been made. 

Failure to meet payments when due results in automatic sus- 
pension of the student from college until the account is brought up 
to date. 

Remittance should be made by certified check or postoffice 
money order payable to Mary Washington College, and sent to the 
Treasurer. 

Off-Campus Students. — Of course, students living off-campus 
will pay all fees due the college quarterly in advance, but will make 
their own financial arrangements in regard to living expenses with 
the hostess in the home in which they live. The college does not 
attempt to collect rents, to stipulate prices, or assume any responsi- 
bility for financial arrangements for off-campus students. 

Late Registration Fee 

An extra fee of $3.00 is charged for late registration except in 
case of an emergency approved by the Registrar. 

Laboratory Fees 

The fees to be paid for laboratory courses are indicated in con- 
nection with description of these courses in another part of this 



Room Reservation Fee 45 

catalogue. Laboratory fees cover the cost of materials and laboratory 
service furnished, and are due at the time of registration. 

Books and Supplies 

Books and supplies are available at the College Shoppe. These 
cannot be included in a student's college account but must be paid 
for in cash at the time of purchase. 

Fee for Use of Radio 

Radios may be installed in dormitory rooms upon receipt of a 
permit from the Dean of Women. Their use is subject to avoidance 
of annoyance to others living in the dormitory. No outside aerials 
will be permitted, and the wiring must be approved by the Superin- 
tendent of Buildings and Grounds. A charge of $1.00 a quarter is 
made to cover the cost of operation. 

Academic Costumes 

Senior students are furnished an academic costume for use dur- 
ing their senior year at a cost of $4.00. 

Special Examination Fee 

A fee of $3.00 is charged for all special examinations except 
such as are necessitated by illness or other unavoidable causes. All 
such examinations must be completed during the quarter immediately 
following the period for which the examination was scheduled. 

Diploma Fee 

At the time of taking a degree, a diploma fee of $7.50 is 
charged. 

Credit 

No degree will be awarded, diploma granted, or transcript of 
credits furnished a student until all financial obligations to the col- 
lege, other than student loans, have been paid. 

All previously incurred expenses at the college must be paid in 
full or secured before a student may re-enter at the beginning of 
any quarter. 



46 Mary Washington College 

Refund of Fees 

In case of withdrawal from college within ten days after regis- 
tration, general college fees will be refunded pro rata with the excep- 
tion of $5.00 to cover cost of registration. Charge for room and 
board will be prorated for the actual time in residence. 

After ten days, and before the middle of a quarter, general 
college fees and living expenses will be returned pro rata. 

After the middle of a quarter, no refund of fees will be made 
except in case of personal illness and upon recommendation of the 
College Physician. 

No refunds will be made to students whose connection with 
the college terminates on account of disciplinary action. 

Withdrawal 

Voluntary Withdrawal. — A student desiring to withdraw 
from college must have the consent of her parent or guardian if she 
is a minor and the approval of the President. When the President 
is cognizant of the full situation and reasons for wishing to with- 
draw before actual withdrawal, frequently he is in position to make 
suggestions and recommendations which enable a student to remain 
in college. 

A student on "campus" who withdraws during this period, 
except for imperative reasons approved by the college, will be recorded 
as suspended for the remainder of the current session. 

Board will be refunded to students withdrawing from college 
temporarily only in case it is necessary to withdraw for a period of 
two weeks or longer on account of personal illness, evidenced by a 
certificate from the attending physician, or for a family emergency 
of which the President is informed and which he approves as an 
emergency. 

Enforced Withdrawal. — Students who are persistently neg- 
lectful of duty or who continuously fail to measure up to the scholas- 
tic or cultural standards of the college may be requested to withdraw 
or not to return to college. 

Rooming Regulations 

Room Furnishings. — The dormitory rooms are furnished 

with single beds, springs, mattresses, and pillows, dressers, study 
tables, chairs, bookcases, and built-in closets. 



Refund of Fees 47' 

The student must furnish bed covering, four sheets, two pillow 
cases, two plain white counterpanes, towels, soap, and other articles 
desired such as student lamps, rugs, etc. It is suggested that curtains 
and decorative bedspreads be selected after reaching the college since 
the selection should be based upon size of windows, color of walls 
and furnishings, and in consultation with roommates. 

Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms. — Each dormitory con- 
tains kitchenettes and well-equipped pressing rooms. Positively no 
cooking, storage or serving of food, or the use of electrical appli- 
ances, are permitted in the dormitory rooms. Any student violating 
this rule will be asked to relinquish her room. 

Room Assignment. — Room assignments are made by the 
Dean of Women and requests for special room placements should be 
made to her. As far as possible, students are permitted to select their 
roommates. A reasonable period is allowed at the beginning of each 
quarter during which adjustments, such as change of room or room- 
mate, may be made with the consent and cooperation of the Dean 
of Women. This privilege is granted because it is felt that students 
work most satisfactorily and are most contented where they have this 
opportunity. The right is reserved, however, to make adjustments 
whenever it is deemed advisable or necessary. 

Rooming Regulations. — Students, except those living at home 
and attending as day students, are required to occupy dormitory 
rooms as long as they are available. After the dormitories are filled, 
students may take rooms in approved private homes in Fredericks- 
burg or in the community near the college. No student may change 
her place of residence without permission from the Supervisor of 
Off-Campus Students, upon request of her parents or guardian. 

Many homes in the community are equipped to take care of 
students who cannot be accommodated in the dormitories. A list of 
approved homes is available and may be secured from the Supervisor 
of Off-Campus Students upon request. 

The administration reserves the right to change the boarding 
or rooming place of any student living off campus when the owner 
does not maintain the standard prescribed by the college; when the 
student is unwilling to cooperate cheerfully with the college manage- 
ment ; or in case the student, without first registering with the Super- 
visor of Off-Campus Students, takes up residence off campus. 



48 Mary Washington College 

All students not living in their own homes, whether 
rooming in the dormitories or private homes, are alike 
subject to the regulations, control, and supervision 
of the college. 

Financial Aid 
Scholarships, Loan Funds, and Employment 

This college deems it a privilege to assist worthy young people 
in obtaining a coveted education. It stands ready to say to a limited 
number of earnest students who are eligible for admission, and are 
not in a position to meet their entire expenses, that it can show them 
a way to obtain a college education. Through its friends and through 
successive legislative appropriations, loan funds to the extent of sev- 
eral thousand dollars each year have been accumulated and are avail- 
able. Non-residents of Virginia are not eligible for loans from the 
State Loan Fund but are eligible for loans from funds derived from 
private sources. 

Eligibility and Tenure. — Scholarships and loans are lim- 
ited, and are awarded on the basis of need, character, and ability. 
Applications for student employment, scholarships, and loans, should 
be made before July 1, and addressed to the President. 

Students receiving financial aid or holding employment scholar- 
ships are required to maintain a high standard of scholarship, a clear 
record in regard to discipline and, in cases of employment, render 
satisfactory service. 

The Chandler Scholarship. — The late Algernon B. Chandler, 
President of the college from 1919 until his death in 1928, made a 
bequest of $1,000 to the college to be invested by the Treasurer, the 
proceeds to be used annually toward the education of some junior 
or senior student. This student is selected by the President taking 
into consideration the following points : scholarship, personality, atti- 
tude, and inability to continue college without help. 

The Frances Thompson Scholarship Fund. — This scholar- 
ship fund is provided in accordance with the terms set forth in the 
will of Frances Thompson. The recipient of the scholarship will be 
selected by the President of the College. Preference will be given 
to girls from Fredericksburg or Spotsylvania County. 



Loan Refund 49 

State Loan Fund. — A student loan fund is made available 
to Virginians through appropriations by the State Legislature. Loans 
may be secured on proper recommendations as long as funds are 
available. Those desiring to borrow from this fund should make 
application to the President before July 1. 

Alpha Phi Sigma Loan Fund. — The Gamma Chapter of this 
honorary scholarship fraternity has established a loan fund of $100.00. 
Preference is given to members of the fraternity, though not limited 
to them. As the Chapter is able, additional units of $100.00 will be 
made available. This loan is awarded by the President of the college 
and the administrative officers of the fraternity. 

Y. W. C. A. Loan Fund.— The Young Women's Christian 
Association of the college has established two loans of $100.00 each 
to be used by worthy seniors. These loans bear two per cent interest 
and are payable within one year after graduation, when the money 
will be reloaned to other seniors, thus perpetuating the fund. These 
loans are awarded by the President of the college and the adminis- 
trative officers of the Y. W. C. A. 

Faculty Men's Club Loan Fund.— The Faculty Men's Club 
has provided a loan fund of $100.00 available to any worthy student 
who may need financial assistance to help defray college expenses. 
The loan bears four per cent interest, and is payable not later than 
two years from date of loan. It is awarded by the President of the 
college. 

Alumnae Association Loan Fund. — The Alumnae Associa- 
tion of the college has established an annual loan fund of $150.00 
available to seniors, preferably daughters of alumnae. Its award is 
based on scholarship, personality, and inability to continue college 
without help. The student is selected by the Board of Directors of 
the Association on the recommendation of the President of the col- 
lege. The loan is to be paid within two years after leaving college. 

Virginia Division United Daughters of the Confederacy 
Loan Fund. — The Virginia Division United Daughters of the Con- 
federacy has established the Nannie Seddon Barney loan fund, which 
is worth $150.00 annually to the holder. This loan fund is available 
to graduates of accredited Virginia high schools. Such graduates to 
be eligible must be lineal descendants of Confederate soldiers. Appli- 



50 Mary Washington College 

cation should be made to Mrs. James B. Morgan, Chairman, Com- 
mittee on Education, Virginia Division U. D. C, 330 Robin Hood 
Road, Roanoke, Virginia. 

Matthew Fontaine Maury Loan Fund. — The Matthew 
Fontaine Maury loan fund was established by the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy of the State and is a memorial to Commodore 
Maury, who was born in Spotsylvania county within ten miles of 
Fredericksburg. The money is loaned on the personal note of the 
student receiving it, bears no interest, and is payable at the con- 
venience of the borrower. The applicant must be the lineal descend- 
ant of a Confederate veteran and a resident of the Fourth or Fifth 
Congressional District. The value of this scholarship is $150.00 a 
year. Application should be made to Mrs. James B. Morgan, 330 
Robin Hood Road, Roanoke, Virginia. 

Student Employment. — In an effort to aid worthy students 
who are unable to finance their entire education, a limited number 
of employment scholarships have been established, which amount to 
about one-third of a student's expenses for the session. These aid 
positions consist of light work in the dining rooms, library, labora- 
tories, laundry, swimming pool, College Shoppe, and offices. 

Service Loving Cup. — Through the interest and generosity 
of the Fredericksburg Kiwanis Club, a silver loving cup is awarded 
each year to the senior who, in the judgment of the faculty, has 
contributed most to the promotion of the interests of the college 
during her stay here. 

Miscellaneous Information 

Baggage. — Trunks are not permitted in students' rooms or 
corridors, but must be stored in a trunk room. 

Taxi. — Students who arrive by rail or bus can secure taxi 
service from the railway station to the college at a very small charge. 

Room Assignments. — Students upon arrival at the college 
should report to the Dean of Women, Virginia Hall, for room as- 
signments. 

Registration. — Full instructions in regard to registration, as- 
signment of classes, etc., will be posted in the halls. Students will 
receive a printed schedule of classes upon matriculation. An extra 



Guests 51 

fee of $3.00 is charged for late registration except in case of an 1 
emergency approved by the Registrar. 

Guests. — Students entertaining guests in the college dining 
halls are charged fifty cents for breakfast or lunch and seventy-five 
cents for dinner. The crowded condition of the dormitories makes 
it inconvenient to have over-night guests. It is not best for guests 
or parents to request over-night entertainment in students' rooms 
therefore. 

Graduates or former students of the college are always wel- 
come, and are not charged for meals or accommodations for a period 
not exceeding two days. Those who remain for a longer period may 
secure meals and room accommodation at the rate of $3.00 a day. 
Due to the very limited facilities available for guests in the dormi- 
tories, it is requested that the Dean of Women be notified in advance 
of a contemplated overnight visit to the college by an alumna. 



Administration 



Organization 

The college is organized on the quarter basis and is open the 
year round. The school year is divided into four quarters — fall, 
winter, spring, and summer. Any three quarters constitute a year's 
work, whether taken consecutively or not. Students who find it 
impossible to attend college except during the summer may complete 
a year's work in three summer quarters. 

Quarter Unity. — Students may enter at the beginning of any 
quarter. Each quarter's work in the several courses is a coherent 
and complete section of work within itself. The courses of study 
are so arranged as to maintain this quarter unity. While subjects 
occurring in two or more quarters in the same year may be related, 
the work of each quarter is separate and distinct and the preceding 
quarter's work is not necessarily a prerequisite in order to pursue 
intelligently the courses of the quarter chosen. 

Summer Quarter. — The summer quarter is an integral part 
of the school year and carries the same credit as any other quarter. 
It is divided into two terms of equal length thus enabling students 
to attend either one term or the full quarter. Classes meet six days 
a week for a term of five weeks, thus giving full six weeks' credit 
in five weeks of attendance, or twelve weeks' credit for the entire 
session of ten weeks. 

Courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, 
and Bachelor of Music degrees, as well as cources necessary for the 
renewal or extension of teachers' certificates, are offered on both the 
quarter and term basis. 

The completion of any three quarters of work, whether con- 
secutive or not, constitutes a full session's work. 

Extension Work. — In order that the college may be as useful 

as possible in its service to the public, extension courses are offered. 
This makes it possible for those who cannot attend college to remain 
at home and yet receive the benefits of college instruction. 

Extension classes are organized in any subject for which there 
is sufficient demand. These classes meet at some convenient place 



Part-Time and Evening Students 53 

and at an hour that is agreeable to both instructor and students. In 
organization and procedure the work corresponds to regular recita- 
tions in the college. 

The location of the college makes it feasible to give extension 
courses in Fredericksburg, Culpeper, Orange, Gordonsville, Alexan- 
dria, Bowling Green, Ashland, Arlington, Warsaw, Fairfax, Ma- 
nassas, Tappahannock, Warrenton, and many other points in the 
immediate section served by this institution. 

Detailed information will be furnished upon request to the 
Dean of the College. 

Evening Classes. — Evening classes for which there is suf- 
ficient demand are offered each quarter for residents of Fredericks- 
burg and vicinity. These courses carry regular college credit. Grad- 
uates of accredited high schools are eligible to enroll. Information 
regarding these courses may be obtained from the office of the Dean 
or the Registrar. 

Part-Time and Evening Students 

In scheduling courses the college has in mind part-time students, 
consisting of teachers in service and those otherwise employed. It 
will be observed, therefore, that a great many courses are scheduled 
for the late afternoon, evening, and on Saturday. This makes it pos- 
sible for those within a reasonable driving distance of the college to 
pursue work toward a degree or for the purpose of renewing or 
extending certificates. In some colleges where part-time courses are 
scheduled students are known to drive as far as fifty miles in order 
to take advantage of the opportunities provided. Mary Washington 
College wishes to be of the greatest service possible and welcomes 
inquiries from those who may be interested in such courses. The 
credit earned is counted as residence credit. 

Classification of Students 

Freshmen. Students with less than 42 quarter hours of credit. 

Sophomores. Students with from 43 to 87 quarter hours of 
credit. 

Juniors. Students with from 88 to 134 quarter hours of credit. 

Seniors. Students with as much as 135 quarter hours of credit. 



54 Mary Washington College 

Student Load 

Fifteen or sixteen hours a quarter or forty-five to forty-eight 
quarter hours for the session of nine months is considered a normal 
load. 

A student not in her first year of college may take as much as 
eighteen hours a quarter, provided she has passed in the preceding 
session courses aggregating forty-five quarter hours with an average 
grade of "C" or better. 

Change of Schedule or Courses 

All schedules of work must be approved by the Registrar. 
After a schedule has been approved, the student is not permitted to 
drop any class or enter a new course without permission from the 
Dean of the College, who will not consider such application more 
than two weeks after registration except with the consent and upon 
the recommendation of the instructors concerned. 

A fee of fifty cents is charged for each change in courses after 
one week from the beginning of the quarter. 

No credit is allowed for any course taken for which the student 
has not registered and which is not listed on the approved schedule 
card filed in the Registrar's office. Dropping a course without per- 
mission will result in a grade of "F." 

Grading 

A student's class standing determines the final grade in any 
course. Class standing is based on the regularity of her attendance 
upon the lectures, laboratory, or similar exercises in connection with 
any given course, combined with the quality of her work as indicated 
by recitation grades, written tests, laboratory work, etc. 

Scholarship standing is indicated as follows: 

A is given for work of unusual excellence. 

B is given for work distinctly above the average. 

C denotes work of average or medium quality. 

D is the lowest passing mark and represents work of inferior 
quality. 

E denotes that the work has been unsatisfactory and that a 
condition has been incurred. Conditions not made up by the end of 
the session automatically become "F." 

Inc. Incomplete. Incompletes not made up by the end of the 
following quarter automatically become F. 



Scholarship Quality Points 55 

F denotes failure and requires that the subject be taken again 
and passed before credit can be allowed. 

Scholarship Quality Points 

A candidate for a degree must have earned as many quality 
points as there are quarter hours' credit required in the curriculum 
before being permitted to graduate. This means, in general, that 
the work of the student must be equal at least to an average grade 
of "C," although the administration will decide whether or not the 
work of a candidate is of sufficiently high quality. 

The following Quality Point system is effective in this college. 
This does not apply to work completed here before this system became 
effective or to work transferred from other colleges and accepted by 
this institution for credit. 

This system is both objective and simple, and enables students 
to keep a constant check on their standing and to know at all times 
whether or not they are meeting the qualitative standard as well as 
the quantitative standard of the college. 

For each quarter hour of credit with a grade of "A" three 
quality points are allowed. 

For each quarter hour of credit with a grade of "B" two quality 
points are allowed. 

For each quarter hour of credit with a grade of "C" one quality 
point is allowed. 

For each quarter hour of credit with a grade of "D" or below, 
no quality point is allowed. 

In each case the number of quarter hours' credit in each course 
is multiplied by the number of quality points assigned to the grade 
made in that course. For example, "A" in a course for which three 
quarter hours' credit are allowed entitles the student to nine quality 
points. In this same course a grade of "B" would entitle the student 
to six quality points; "C" to three quality points; and no quality 
points would be allowed for "D." This means that a student falling 
below "C" on a course would have to make sufficiently high grades 
on other work to bring up her quality points to the desired standard 
or, if she fails to do this, she will be allowed to repeat a sufficient 
number of the courses on which she made "D" to bring her work 
up to the necessary level for graduation. 

Students entering from other colleges are required to make as 
many quality points here as additional hours of credit required at 
this institution in order to complete the curriculum taken. 



56 Mary Washington College 

The Dean's List 

A student who makes an average of at least "B" on her work 
for any quarter with no grade below "C" is placed on the Dean's 
List of Honor Students. 

Reports, Deficiencies and Failures 

A careful record is kept in the office of the Registrar of the 
entrance credits and work at this college of all students. 

Regular reports are mailed to parents at the end of each quarter. 
These include a record of the student's scholastic standing, with such 
other information as may be deemed important. 

In addition, parents and students are notified of unsatisfactory 
or deficient work about the middle of each quarter. In this way, 
students are given every opportunity and encouragement to make up 
any deficiencies or probable failures before the end of the quarter. 
Parents are requested to cooperate by discouraging week-end visits 
away from the college until such deficiencies are made up. 

This system has been in operation for several years and has 
reduced the percentage of failures materially. The college does not 
deem it fair to keep those who are doing unsatisfactory work in 
ignorance of their scholastic standing until the end of the quarter 
and then place them on probation, without first giving them an 
opportunity to make up the work. It has been demonstrated that 
a large percentage of failures is due to factors which can be con- 
trolled, and that the majority are not due to lack of innate ability 
but rather to contributing causes. 

Students with academic deficiencies are urged to attend the 
summer session and utilize the opportunities offered to remove these 
deficiencies and improve their scholastic standing. Practically all of 
the constant courses for the various degrees are offered in the two 
terms of the summer quarter. In order to graduate it is necessary 
to maintain a general average of at least "C" and also an average 
of at least "C" in the major field. 

The Dean of the College, the Director of Personnel, and the 
Registrar are ready at all times to confer with students or parents 
regarding academic problems, especially in case of unsatisfactory 
progress. 



Excuses, Absences and Class Cuts 57 

Scholastic Achievement Necessary to Remain in College 

In order to be eligible to continue in the college, freshmen 
must pass a satisfactory number of courses in each quarter, and a 
total of at least thirty quarter hours before beginning the work of 
the fourth quarter. 

After the freshman year, a student must pass at least ten hours 
a quarter. 

In case a student had been handicapped by circumstances beyond 
her control, the circumstances in each individual case will be given 
full consideration by the administration in reaching a decision. 

No student who fails to qualify under the above standards may 
be a member of a student publication, the Band, the Glee Club, the 
Orchestra, the Dramatic Club, etc., or represent the college on any 
public occasion. 

Excuses, Absences and Class Cuts 

Excuses. — Excuses for boarding students on account of illness 
must be submitted by the College Physician directly to the Regis- 
trar's office. Excuses for illness of students living off campus must 
be submitted to the Registrar's office by the parent, hostess, or at- 
tending physician, stating the nature of the illness. 

Students must secure permission from the College Physician 
in advance when desiring to consult a physician or specialist off the 
campus. 

No excuses will be accepted for absence from classes except 
for illness on the part of the students or an emergency in the home. 
In the latter case, the excuse should come from the parent, guardian, 
or attending physician to the President's office, stating reason for 
absence. All excuses for absences must be submitted within three 
days after the absence has occurred. 

Under no circumstances are students excused from classes in 
order to leave college early before a holiday or the close of a 'session, 
nor will excuses be accepted for late returns after holidays. 

Of course, permission to be absent from the college will be 
granted upon request of parents or guardians. However, such absence 
does not relieve the student of responsibility for attending classes, 
and is not counted as excused absence from classes except in case of 
illness or an emergency. Parents often do not realize how seriously 
they affect the college standing of their children by calling them 



58 Mary Washington College 

home when there is no urgent necessity. It is most earnestly re- 
quested, therefore, that a parent or guardian not call a student away 
from the college except under most urgent circumstances. 

Absences. — Members of the faculty report to the Registrar's 
office all absences. Unexcused absences are taken into consideration 
in making up the student's final grades. No student may receive 
credit for a course meeting three times a week from which she has 
been absent more than nine times during the quarter whether excused 
or unexcused, or for a course meeting five times a week from which 
she has been absent more than twelve times during the quarter. Stu- 
dents are urged, therefore, to attend classes regularly, and not to 
jeopardize their class standing by absences. 

Class Cuts. — The system of class cuts is designed to cover all 
other absences from classes not covered under the head of "Excuses." 
The number of cuts to which a student is entitled in any given 
quarter is determined by her class standing in the previous quarter. 
See Student Handbook for details in regard to excuses and class cuts. 
Any absences immediately preceding or succeeding a holiday count 
as two class cuts. 

Week-End Visits 

Although under college regulations at present, students are 
permitted to make week-end visits at such times as will not conflict 
with class schedules or college obligations, they are requested not to 
make frequent and unnecessary visits away from the college due to 
the overloaded transportation facilities and wartime conditions and, 
in order to comply with the requests of the Government and trans- 
portation officials, to limit travel as far as possible, especially over 
the week-ends, to trips of vital importance. Furthermore, students 
are discouraged from spending frequent week-ends away from the 
college as this practice tends to interfere with their work. 

The privilege of week-end visits, including Sunday as a part 
of the week-end, is withdrawn from those who are failing or deficient 
in their work. 

Special written permission from the student's parent or guardian 
must be obtained in advance for each visit away from the college 
other than to her home. 

The above ruling may be changed during the session if found 
desirable or necessary. 



Prerequisites for Student Teaching 59 

Student Teaching, Observation and Demonstration 

A very important phase of a teacher's education is the contact 
with actual school situations during her college career. The co- 
operating schools serve as laboratories in which to develop the proper 
attitude, spirit, power, and skill. Most of the required subject mat- 
ter and other necessary classroom requirements must be met before 
students are assigned to student teaching. 

Student teaching is done in the public schools of the City of 
Fredericksburg and in other cooperating schools throughout the sec- 
tion of the State in which the college is located. 

The Fredericksburg High and Elementary Schools are housed 
in a large, modern, and well-equipped plant, located within a short 
walking distance of the college campus. In addition to classrooms, 
the buildings contain an auditorium, gymnasium, cafeteria, work 
rooms, laboratories, and an excellent library. The school grounds 
are provided with a stadium and ample playground facilities. 

A limited number of students in their senior year may be as- 
signed to apprentice teaching in cooperating schools throughout the 
State. These students are placed under carefully selected participat- 
ing teachers for one quarter, and are graded not only on the basis of 
teaching ability, but on their citizenship and standing as a member of 
a community as well. Sometimes a student is able to do her appren- 
tice teaching in her home community and to live at home during 
the quarter. 

In case it is necessary for a student to live away from the col- 
lege while she is doing her apprentice teaching, the college will make 
the necessary adjustments and arrangements in regard to her living 
expenses during that particular quarter. 

Prerequisites for Student Teaching 

Students are not permitted to do their student teaching unless 
they have an average grade of "C" or higher in the college classroom 
courses. Aptitude, temperament, and personality receive considera- 
tion, in addition to scholarship. The administration will decide in 
exceptional cases whether or not a student is to be admitted to the 
training schools. 

No credit is allowed for student teaching on which the grade 
is below "C." 

No one who has an unremoved condition or failure on more than 
four quarter hours of work will be permitted to do student teaching. 



60 Mary Washington College 

Requirements for Graduation 

1. An applicant for a degree must have credit for 189 quarter 
hours of work in keeping with the requirements of the curriculum 
she is pursuing and a minimum of 189 scholarship quality points. 

2. A student who fails to earn the requisite number of scholar- 
ship quality points by the time she completes the courses specified for 
a degree may take sufficient additional work to earn the required 
number of scholarship quality points, but such courses must be ap- 
proved by the Dean. 

3. A student who has transferred credits from another college 
is required to make as many scholarship quality points at Mary 
Washington College as additional hours of credit required at this 
institution in order to complete the curriculum taken. 

4. The responsibility for meeting the requirements for a degree 
rests on the student. 

5. A formal application for a degree must be filed in the Reg- 
istrar's office by December 1 of the academic year in which the degree 
is to be conferred. 

6. At least one year of residence (three quarters) in Mary 
Washington College is required for a degree, and the last quarter 
of a student's work must be done in residence at this college. 

7. Not more than one-fourth of any curriculum leading to a 
degree may be taken in extension classes or by correspondence. Stu- 
dents working toward a degree should consult the Registrar before 
enrolling in a correspondence course. 

Placement Bureau 

The Bureau is a clearing house for graduates and well qualified 
students who are seeking positions. Superintendents, members of 
school boards, and others who are in need of teachers or specialists 
in the various fields are invited to visit the college, make use of the 
Placement Bureau, and to meet applicants. Where this is not pos- 
sible, confidential reports giving a full and accurate estimate of each 
applicant, will be furnished on request. 

For a number of years, the College Placement Bureau has been 
unable to meet the demands for secretaries, business workers, dieti- 
tians, teachers, and specialists in various fields. 

This Bureau is under the direction of the Dean of the College. 



Terminology 61 

Lectures 

Members of the college faculty are available for lectures of a 
professional or popular character on subjects that may be desired by 
teachers or by commercial and social clubs, and other organizations, 
as well as for commencement addresses. Dates and other arrange- 
ments will be a matter of determination at the time. 

Terminology 

Quarter Hours. — All credit toward graduation is calculated 
in quarter hours. The term "quarter hour" means a subject given 
one day a week through a quarter of a year, approximately twelve 
weeks. Most of the college courses call for three recitations a week. 
These are called three-hour courses. A student usually selects fifteen 
or sixteen hours a quarter (the equivalent of five courses each meet- 
ing three times a week) as her regular work. 

Constant. — This is a course required of all students in a given 
curriculum. 

Elective. — A course not required for a particular curriculum. 

Major. — This expression is used to show the more prominent 
line of work pursued on a degree curriculum. The major consists of 
not less than 36 quarter hours of credit. 

Minor. — This term is used to indicate the line of work pur- 
sued that is second in prominence. A minor consists of not less than 
27 quarter hours of credit. 

Course. — This means a subject or portion of a subject as out- 
lined in this bulletin for a quarter's work in one line. 

Curriculum. — This means the full quantity and quality of 
work that is accepted as evidence of qualifications for a diploma or 
a degree. 

Quality Points. — These are awarded on each quarter hour of 
credit according to the grade of scholarship attained. As many qual- 
ity points as quarter hours of credit required at this institution for 
graduation from any curriculum are necessary. 

Unit. — This term applies to secondary work and respresents a 
minimum of five 40-minute periods of class work a week for at 
least 36 weeks. 



62 Mary Washington College 

Student Welfare 

Every effort is made to create a home-like atmosphere in the 
college. In living at close range, work and play must be happily 
proportioned. Friendliness and helpfulness characterize the spirit 
of the student body, while a regard for the rights of others and a 
consideration for the property of others is advocated consistently, 
thereby making of the college a pleasant and profitable home in 
which to live. 

All possible freedom of movement is allowed students, con- 
sistent with the academic and social standards of the college. Irregu- 
larities which bring criticism or reproach upon the student or the 
college are not permitted. 

Students are expected to adhere to a high standard of conduct 
and not need to be reminded constantly of detailed rules and regula- 
tions. Few formal or printed rules are, therefore, imposed upon them. 
The college authorities and members of the faculty rely upon stu- 
dents' sense of honor and strive always to appeal to their better selves. 

Guidance and Supervision 

The Dean of the college is general academic adviser to students, 
and they are urged to consult him regarding their classroom work, 
selection of courses, and any academic problems. 

The Dean of Women is general adviser to students in matters 
pertaining to their social life, dormitory life, and general welfare. 
This applies to both resident and off-campus students not living in 
their own homes. 

The Dean of Freshmen is particularly concerned with the prob- 
lems of first-year students and works in cooperation with the Dean 
of Women. Students living in approved homes are under the direc- 
tion of the Supervisor of Off-Campus Students. 

In addition, each of the residence halls is in immediate charge 
of a full-time hostess or counselor. These hostesses serve in the 
capacity of housemothers, under the general direction of the Dean 
of Women and the Dean of Freshmen, and are directly responsible 
to the President of the College. 

Furthermore, the Director of Student Personnel and the Ad- 
visory Council, composed of members of the faculty appointed by 
the President of the college, assist students in making physical, men- 
tal, moral, and social adjustments. Students are urged to consult 



Government and Discipline 63 

the Director of Student Personnel and the Advisory Council upon 
any problems on which they desire advice or assistance. 

In addition, each member of the faculty is adviser to a small 
group of freshmen, and is ready at all times, and especially at the 
beginning of the session, to counsel and assist freshmen in every way 
possible. Students are given the names of their faculty advisers at 
the beginning of the session and are expected to report to them as 
early as possible. 

Also, the heads of departments and other members of the faculty 
are ready and anxious to confer with students in regard to courses, 
details of the curriculum they wish to pursue, failures, etc. It is 
suggested that students confer regularly and frequently with their 
instructors in regard to their studies, and especially unsatisfactory 
classroom work. In this way the reasons for deficiencies or failures 
are frequently discovered and corrected. 

Government and Discipline 

All discipline is vested in the President of the college. 

Cases involving honor or minor infractions of discipline are 
referred to and acted upon by Student Council. The Student Coun- 
cil is under the advice, guidance, and supervision of the Joint Council. 
The latter is composed of four representatives elected by the student 
body and three members of the faculty appointed by the President. 

All decisions of Joint Council involving serious discipline are 
referred to the President for his approval or veto. 

The Honor System 

The honor system implies that a student is trustworthy and 
will not violate her pledged word or commit a dishonest or dishon- 
orable act in connection with her college life or classroom work. 
Every student entering the college is expected to conform to the 
accepted standards of refined womanhood. 

Matriculation at Mary Washington College constitutes an 
implicit promise and a pledge on the part of the student to familiar- 
ize herself with the rules and regulations of the college and student 
government, and to conform to such regulations so long as she re- 
mains in the college. 

Pledge. — No test, examination, thesis, or report on parallel 
reading will be accepted by an instructor which does not contain the 



64 Mary Washington College 

following pledge written out in full and signed: "I hereby declare 
upon my word of honor that I have neither given nor received help 
on this examination (test or assignment)." The honor system applies 
not only to classroom work, however, but to other phases of college 
life involving dishonesty. 

All that concerns the physical, mental, and moral well-being 
of the students of Mary Washington College elicits the solicitude of 
the President and the members of the staff, and the students are 
assured of wise counsel and friendly guidance. While exercising 
authority with freedom and firmness, compliance with rules and regu- 
lations is expected to be based rather upon a sense of right and 
appreciation of the necessity of system and order than upon the fear 
of set penalties. 

The college reserves the right to request any student whose 
conduct or general attitude are considered unsatisfactory by the 
authorities of the college, to withdraw even though no specific charge 
is made against her. 

Health 

Mary Washington College is vitally interested in the preven- 
tion of illness and the promotion of a high standard of health in its 
student body. As a result, the college enjoys a remarkable health 
record, and has had comparatively few cases of serious illness. 

The college maintains a close supervision over those conditions 
that affect student health in order that all cases of illness may be 
given immediate and expert care; that the incidence and spread of 
contagious diseases may be reduced to the lowest terms ; and that the 
general working efficiency and living standards of the students may 
be maintained at the highest possible level. 

Each student upon entrance to the college is given a general 
examination by the medical staff without extra cost. In addition, a 
Clinic is held at the college, usually in January, at which time all 
students and members of the faculty and staff are expected to have 
chest X-rays, except those who can present certificates showing that 
they have had a chest X-ray within the past twelve months and the 
result. A nominal fee of $1.00 is charged for this service by the Clinic. 

The fees for living expenses for students living in college resi- 
dence halls include the charges for services of the medical and nursing 
staff of the college and a maximum of fifteen (15) days in the college 



Health 65 

Infirmary during the session. Extra time in the Infirmary will be 
charged for at the rate of $1.00 a day. 

Students living off the campus are entitled to the services of 
the college medical and nursing staff upon payment of a medical fee 
of $2.00 a quarter, payable in advance, which covers office calls and 
treatment for slight illnesses or minor accidents. In case of con- 
finement to the Infirmary, there is an additional charge of $1.00 a 
day, payable on leaving the Infirmary, to cover board and room 
service. Students not living in their own homes will find this service 
indispensable. 

Specialists, Private Nursing, Etc. — The college does not 
assume responsibility for the cost of the services of specialists or 
private nurses, or for special prescriptions, operations, hospital fees, 
or epidemics, either for students residing in college residence halls 
or living off the campus. 

A daily report of illness is made to the President of the college 
and the Dean of Women by the Infirmary. In cases of severe illness 
or accident, the parents or guardians are informed promptly. 

Mary Washington Hospital, a private institution, located in 
the City of Fredericksburg and convenient to the college, is well 
equipped and in charge of a splendid staff of specialists. Here stu- 
dents may secure the services of widely recognized physicians and 
surgeons in cases of severe illness or emergencies. 

Health Regulations. — 

1. Off-campus students who do not pay the medical fee are not 
entitled to the services of the Infirmary or college medical and 
nursing staff. 

2. It is necessary to secure an excuse from the College Physician 
for any absence from class on account of illness. 

3. A student ill enough to be in bed is not allowed to remain in 
a dormitory, but must be in the Infirmary where she can have 
medical attention and care of the nurses. 

4. The hostess in charge of each dormitory or residence hall must 
report any cases of illness to the Infirmary promptly. 

5. Hostesses or the heads of homes in which off-campus students 
are living are required to report without delay, to the Infirmary 



66 Mary Washington College 

any cases of illness which may occur among the students in 
their homes. 

6. Students at home on account of illness are required to notify 
the College Physician immediately upon their return to college. 

7. Students who have been exposed to any infectious disease must 
report to the College Physician before attending classes or 
mingling with other students. 

8. Students living in their homes or off-campus students who have 
been ill with infectious disease must report to the College Phy- 
sician before resuming classes. 

9. Consulting physicians are called at the request of either the 
student or her parents or guardian, but must be called by either 
the College Physician or nurse. 

Cooperative Health Program. — Every student is required to 

participate in some form of physical education which is in keeping 
with the condition and particular physical needs of the individual. 
This training varies with individual needs and may include correc- 
tive measures and modified exercise. Furthermore, special guidance 
may be provided, if necessary, for those suffering from physical defects 
or handicaps. 

The work of the Department of Health and Physical Educa- 
tion is coordinated and integrated with other departments of the 
college, and especially with the work of the college physician, the 
infirmary, the Department of Dietetics, and the work in psychology 
and mental hygiene. No student is permitted to engage in any form 
of activity or exercise until it has been ascertained whether or not 
it is fitted to her physical condition and emotional reactions. 

A complete program of intra-mural activities is provided, in- 
cluding hockey, basketball, softball, tennis, swimming, golf, fencing, 
dancing, archery, and equitation. 

Personality Development 

Mary Washington College endeavors to make the student body 
and, as far as possible, the members of the faculty, personality 
conscious. 

"Personality" and "efficiency" now assume added meaning. 
Young women of today must learn to acquire and maintain poise 
under varying circumstances, to perform with ease and efficiency 



Religious Life 67 

their duties in the home or in professional life, learn how not only 
to appear at their best but how to be at their best at all times. 

While all departments are more or less interested in this im- 
portant phase of instruction, the Personality Development Clinic 
serves as a clearing house. 

Emphasis is given to such subjects as personal grooming, in- 
cluding proper choice of clothes, becomingness of dress, proper and 
becoming color combinations, makeup, and posture; speech, including 
energy, stamina, and emotional stability; general attitude, including 
courtesy, considerateness, and etiquette, with emphasis on coopera- 
tion; character attributes, including dependability, discretion, punc- 
tiliousness, etc. 

An important phase of this program is carried out in a labora- 
tory under the direction of an expert physiotherapy technician where 
instruction is offered for the purpose of teaching students how to 
relax, lessen strain, and how to improve their body mechanics and 
posture when sitting, standing, walking, and doing numerous every- 
day activities. 

Instruction in the laboratory plus daily practice by the students 
improves appearance, poise, and grace of movement, and also decreases 
fatigue. In other words, these young women are provided with the 
opportunity, under competent and sympathetic guidance, to develop 
for themselves the kind and degree of efficiency which will enable 
them to fill more completely the role they are destined to play — that 
of competent leaders in an ever-changing world. 

Religious Life 

This institution is non-sectarian and, recognizing the religious 
freedom of the students, does not attempt to project into their lives 
the views of any one church. It does feel a deep responsibility, how- 
ever, for their religious welfare and endeavors to maintain high moral 
and Christian standards. Assembly and chapel exercises are held 
regularly during the session and ministers from the city are asked 
to take part in conducting these services from time to time. 

In addition, programs are contributed by members of the faculty, 
prominent outside speakers, Student Government, Y. W. C. A., and 
other departments and organizations of the school. 

The churches in Fredericksburg represent practically every de- 
nomination and all extend a cordial welcome to the students. While 
church attendance is not compulsory, all students are encouraged to 



68 Mary Washington College 

affiliate themselves with some church during their residence here. 
The spirit of cooperation between the college and the various local 
churches is one of mutual helpfulness. 

College Y. W. C. A.— The Young Women's Christian As- 
sociation holds daily vesper services and a weekly devotional meeting 
to which members of the faculty and the student body are invited. 
Standing as it does for the development of the body, mind, and spirit, 
the Association seeks to meet the various needs of the students, a 
large percentage of whom are members of this organization. Through 
various committees, freshmen are aided in adjusting themselves to a 
new environment, in making new friends, and in discovering worth- 
while programs in which to participate. 

Assembly and Convocation. — Short assembly and chapel ex- 
ercises are held on Tuesdays and Fridays, and convocation on Wed- 
nesday evening. Students are required to attend these exercises, and 
members of the faculty are urged to attend. 

Social Life 

In order that students may receive a well-rounded education, 
it is necessary that there be offered opportunities for entertainment, 
recreation, and a general broadening of their intellectual life in 
addition to certain definite courses of instruction. 

The social calendar for the year is varied and includes formal 
receptions; formal dinners; teas; programs by the departments such 
as music, dramatics, physical education, etc.; lectures; moving pic- 
tures; May Day festivities; alumnae banquets; informal inter-class 
parties; club parties; hikes; picnics; tennis; golf; swimming; and 
horseback riding. 

In addition, a program of entertainment consisting of Lyceum 
numbers, such as symphony orchestras, vocal and instrumental music, 
drama, etc., in which well-known artists appear, is provided by the 
college without extra cost to students. 

Dress. — There are certain social occasions, such as the Lyceum 
numbers and formal receptions and dinners, when formal dress is 
not only in order but expected. It is, therefore, suggested that stu- 
dents include in their wardrobes at least one long dinner dress and 
one evening dress to meet the needs of these social functions. 

No attempt is made to set up a standard of dress, but students 
are expected to observe neatness, appropriateness, and good taste in 



Student Organizations and Activities 69 

personal appearance in the classrooms, dining rooms, on the campus, 
and on all occasions both formal and informal. This is stressed 
because of the present-day tendency on the part of some students to 
dress unconventionally in overalls and other costumes unbecoming 
the dignity of young women in college. 

Student Organizations and Activities 

College Chorus 

The College Chorus of 100 members is under the direction of 
the Music Department. Students with good natural voices are 
eligible for membership. The music and training are planned so as 
to be of permanent educational value. 

Glee Club 

The members of the Glee Club are selected by the director. 
The club appears in public performances locally and elsewhere and 
in radio broadcasts. 

Orchestra 

The orchestra gives several concerts during the year, broadcasts 
frequently, and provides music for special occasions at the college. 

Band 

The Band is composed of forty-eight experienced players, one 
drum major, two majorettes, and a color guard. It functions both 
as a musical organization and as optional training for music majors. 
The Band is an important unit in the college life and takes part 
frequently in outdoor activities. 

Dramatic Club 

Students who have had or are taking a course in Play Produc- 
tion, or who have demonstrated their dramatic ability, are eligible 
for membership in "The Mary Washington Players." The club 
sponsors at least three three-act plays a year. Because of the prox- 
imity to Richmond and Washington, opportunity is afforded this 
group to witness some of the best professional theatrical productions. 



70 Mary Washington College 

German Club 

The German Club promotes a high social atmosphere among 
the girls, and has as its objective more than the purely recreational. 
The club sponsors at least two formal dances a year. 

Cotillion Club 

The Cotillion Club offers to the students, especially the fresh- 
men, an added opportunity for social life. The members of the club, 
one-half of whom are freshmen, are chosen in a democratic manner by 
the students who were members the previous year. The club spon- 
sors two formal dances a year. 

College Promenade 

In order that all students living either in college dormitories 
or off the campus may have the opportunity of attending one or more 
formal dances a year, the college sponsors the Promenade. Two 
formal dances a year are held in addition to the dances sponsored by 
the German and Cotillion Clubs. 

Athletic Association 

The Athletic Association promotes wholesome activity and recre- 
ation among the students. It cooperates with campus organizations 
by maintaining the highest standards of college life and emphasizing 
the values of participation in intra-mural athletics. Its program of 
activities includes hockey, basketball, swimming, riding, tennis, danc- 
ing, golf, archery, softball, fencing and others. Membership is open 
to all students. 

Fencing Club 

The Fencing Club offers an opportunity to develop skill with 
the foil. Membership entails previous experience in fencing. Club 
meetings are held regularly during the winter quarter. 

Swimming Club 

The Swimming Club is organized to develop greater skill in all 
forms of swimming. Members participate in the National Tele- 
graphic Meet each spring. This organization sponsors the annual 
water pageant. 



Student Organizations and Activities 71 

Senior Dance Club 

This club provides opportunities for students who wish to con- 
tinue their study of the dance as an art form. Membership is based 
upon experience in the field of dancing. This club assists with the 
May Day production. It meets semi-weekly for one and one-half 
hours and one social evening each month. 

Junior Dance Club 

This club provides opportunities to students who are interested 
and have had little experience in the dance field. It meets semi- 
weekly for one hour. The Junior Club assists the Senior Club in 
presenting Recitals and the May Day production. 

The American Folk Dance Club 

This club is organized to perpetuate the American square and 
country dances, and is especially interested in promoting the old folk 
songs and dances. Membership is open to anyone interested in 
American dancing. Meetings are held one evening a month. 

Riding Club 

The purpose of the Riding Club is to give those who enjoy 
horseback riding an opportunity to ride under approved conditions, 
and to learn the technique necessary to be known by a good horse- 
woman. An annual horse show is sponsored by the club. 

The Athenaeum 

The Athenaeum is a student organization planned primarily 
for a closer association among those engaged in classical studies. Its 
further purpose is to create through various group activities a live- 
lier interest in the humanities and our rich heritage from the ancient 
world. 

Sigma Tau Chi 

The purposes of this organization are to encourage the acqui- 
sition of knowledge and skill in the field of business and to promote 
the development of desirable personality. Appropriate cultural and 
social activities are carried on by the organization. Regular meet- 
ings are held monthly. Students majoring in commerce are eligible 
for membership. 



72 Mary Washington College 

Home Economics Club 

The club was organized by students majoring or minoring in 
home economics for the purpose of studying the various vocations 
into which home economics leads and also to promote social life on 
the campus. 

The club meets once a month for an hour to discuss business, 
and frequently on Sunday afternoons for delightful informal teas. 
Educational trips, picnics, and other good times foster friendship 
and understanding between the faculty and students and among the 
students themselves. 

Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club 

The Matthew Fontaine Maury Science Club is sponsored by 
the Science Department. Membership is open to students who have 
had at least one year of science. Its purpose is to foster a deeper 
appreciation of science as a cultural field, to broaden the scientific 
horizon, and to encourage a more profound interest in the subject. 

Monthly meetings are held. Specialists in the various scientific 
fields are invited to speak to members of the club from time to time. 

Art Club 

The Art Club is composed of a group of students majoring or 
minoring in Art and others who have demonstrated their ability in 
this line of work. This club sponsors art exhibitions and lectures, 
visits art museums, and takes part in other special events of interest 
to the group. 

International Relations Club 

The International Relations Club is organized under the aus- 
pices of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Mem- 
bership includes majors and minors in the social sciences, and students 
who manifest real interest in world affairs and who meet certain 
scholarship requirements and prerequisite training. 

The local club holds semi-monthly meetings; an International 
Institute each year on the local campus; gives programs of an inter- 
national nature before the student body ; secures outstanding speakers 
to address public meetings during the year; and undertakes certain 
projects of an international character. 



Student Organizations and Activities 73 

Modern Portias 

The "Modern Portias" is a literary club sponsored by the Head 
of the English Department. Membership in this organization is open 
to English majors and minors of junior and senior rank. Its purpose 
is to foster the study of English classical literature, to develop a 
keener appreciation for correctness in form and for true merit in the 
content of literature, and to contribute to the general culture and 
social aspects of life at college. The club meets for one hour twice 
a month. A formal dinner is given by the sponsor once a year. 



Cap and Gown 

This organization is a senior honor society with a membership 
of no less than seven or no more than twenty girls selected during 
the last quarter of their Junior year on the basis of service to the 
college, leadership, scholarship, and personality. The members must 
have an average two points higher than the class average for election. 
The present scholarship requirement is 1.8. The purpose of the 
organization is to promote college loyalty, to advance the spirit of 
service and fellowship among university women, and to stimulate 
and develop a finer type of college woman. New members are elected 
by the outgoing members. 



Alpha Phi Sigma National Scholastic Fraternity 

The purpose of this organization is to encourage high scholastic 
attainment both in high school and in college. High school valedic- 
torians and salutatorians are automatically initiated into the fraternity 
upon admission to the college. Any other student who has been in 
the college six months and whose scholarship ranks in the upper sixth 
is eligible. 



Alpha Tau Pi National Professional Society 

The purposes of this society are to develop leadership among 
prospective elementary teachers; to carry into the field a fraternal 
spirit among elementary teachers; and to direct teacher interest in 
child welfare both in and out of school. Members are admitted from 
the junior and senior classes. 



74 Mary Washington College 

Pi Omega Pi Honorary Fraternity 
Pi Omega Pi is a national honorary commercial fraternity. Its 
purposes are to create, promote, and extend interest and scholarship 
in commerce; to aid in civic betterment in colleges; to encourage 
and foster high ethical standards in business and in the teaching 
profession ; and to teach the ideal of service as the basis of all worthy 
enterprises. Active members are juniors and seniors in college who 
have a superior standing in commercial studies and an average stand- 
ing in all other studies. 

Pi Sigma Kappa 
Pi Sigma Kappa is a speech organization interested in promot- 
ing declamation, oratory, debating and extemporaneous speaking. 
Among its many activities, it sponsors intramural as well as inter- 
collegiate debating. Students are encouraged to participate in chapel 
and convocation programs, and strive for poise and clarity in public 
speaking. Membership is open to all students. 

Alpha Psi Omega 
Students who do outstanding work in the several phases of 
dramatic art are eligible for membership in Alpha Psi Omega, a 
national honorary dramatic fraternity. 

The Epaulet 
The Epaulet is a literary magazine published quarterly by the 
students of Mary Washington College under the guidance of the 
Modern Portias. Its purpose is to encourage students to write 
original compositions and to aid them in discovering whatever literary 
ability they possess. 

The Bullet 
The Bullet is a student periodical issued weekly. It is managed 
and edited by the student body with the advice of a faculty com- 
mittee, and contains social and business news of the college, supple- 
mented by personal contributions by members of the student body. 
Through the Bullet the alumnae may keep in touch with the college. 

The Battlefield 

The Battlefield is the annual student publication. Designed to 

be of enduring interest to each student in the institution, it contains 

individual pictures of all students, class pictures, and pictures of 

individuals and of familiar scenes in school life. Records of impor- 



Student Organizations and Activities 75 

tant and interesting events and features which occur during the year 
are included. The publication of the annual is entrusted to a staff 
composed of students who are elected by the student body, assisted 
by. a faculty committee which serves in an advisory capacity. 

Radio Broadcasting Workshop 

The importance of radio as an educational and socializing 
agency is generally recognized today. With the development of 
community broadcasting stations, opportunities in the field of radio 
have increased tremendously. 

Aside from the vocational aspects, there is a decided interest 
in the development of a good radio "presence" on the part of edu- 
cators, civic and club leaders, and interested people in general. In 
fact, the wide use of radio for education, entertainment, and adver- 
tisement today makes a pleasing radio presence and voice highly 
important and almost a vital necessity. Courses in public speaking 
alone are not sufficient for modern needs. 

In maintaining a radio broadcasting workshop, Mary Washing- 
ton College is endeavoring to meet this demand for a worthwhile 
sefvice to that ever increasing number of young people and adults 
who are interested in radio either as a vocation or an avocation. 
Complete broadcasting studios and a control room with the most 
modern and complete equipment are located in George Washington 
Hall. There are direct wires to Station WFVA, a Blue network 
station, and the radio control room is also wired to the stage of the 
auditorium, to the roof garden, and to the ballroom in George Wash- 
ington Hall. Opportunities are thus provided for audience reaction 
to programs that are broadcast and for radio and broadcasting expe- 
riences of many different types. 

Studio conditions at the college are similar to those of a typical 
broadcasting station, so that every phase of radio work from control 
room monitoring and operation, to dramatic, speech, and musical 
work before the microphone, are studied and experienced. The latest 
type of recording mechanisms enable the prospective speaker or artist 
to hear himself just as others hear him, and also to study in detail 
the effect of the program that has just been rehearsed. Special atten- 
tion is given to the development of a pleasing and effective radio- 
speaking voice, as well as experience in many other types of radio 
work. 

Courses in radio broadcasting are open to all students. 



Program of Studies 



Degrees. — Curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts, the Bach- 
elor of Science, and the Bachelor of Music degrees are provided. 
The Bachelor of Music degree is a more highly specialized curricu- 
lum than the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in music. 

Students now enrolled in the college and students transferring 
with advanced standing from other institutions are referred to the 
catalogue issue of 1943-44, containing announcements for the ses- 
sion of 1944-45, for a detailed listing of requirements for degrees 
and major and minor sequences. 

The degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor of 
Science in Education will not be awarded after June, 1948. How- 
ever, students who wish to prepare for teaching may elect courses in 
Psychology and Education (See courses offered in these departments 
under Course Offerings, pages 118-121). 

Beginning with September, 1945, a new program of degree 
requirements will become effective for incoming freshmen. The new 
requirements are designed to permit greater flexibility in the selec- 
tion of courses leading toward a degree and, at the same time, pro- 
vide more extensive study in a field of special interest. In place of 
the former requirement of one major and two minor subjects, stu- 
dents will be asked to select a field of concentration or major pro- 
gram to which they will devote a large proportion of their program 
of studies in the junior and senior years. 

The same general requirements will obtain for both the Bach- 
elor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees. The nature of the 
degree will be determined by the major program that has been pur- 
sued. A more detailed explanation of the new plan follows. 

Quarter Hours Credit Required for Degree. — A total of 
189 quarter hours of credit are required for a degree. Candidates 
for graduation are required to show a specified number of quality 
points. See page 55. 

New Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science 

One hundred and eighty-nine quarter hours of credit are re- 
quired for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science 
degree, 84 quarter hours of which must be distributed as follows: 



Degrees *'■ 77 

Quarter 
Required Courses Hours 

English 18 

Foreign Language 18 

(Only 9 required if 4 units in foreign language are of- 
fered for admission.) 

History 9 

Natural Science 12 

Mathematics or Fine Arts 9 

Social Science, Philosophy, or Psychology 9 

Health and Physical Education 9 

Total credits in required courses 84 

Major program 54 

Electives 51 

Total required for degree 189 

Courses counted toward fulfilling any of the above required 
subjects for a degree can not be counted also as a part of the major 
program. A major program in English, for example, must include 
54 quarter hours in that subject or in related fields specified by the 
department, in addition to the 18 quarter hours required of all 
students. 

Courses which already have been taken to fulfill a degree re- 
quirement in that subject may be applied to the major program if 
the degree requirements can be met in some other way. For exam- 
ple, a student who has completed 18 quarter hours in French and 
decides to major in that field may take 18 credits in some other 
language to fulfill the degree requirement and count the credits in 
French that have been earned as a part of a major program in that 
field. 

Certain courses offered in some departments are specified as 
acceptable for elective credit only. 

Major Program. — Ordinarily, the major program will in- 
clude 36 quarter hours in the major subject and 18 quarter hours 
in related subjects offered either in that department or in other 
departments. 

Detailed statements of the major programs in each department 
will be available to students entering in September, 1945. Mean- 
while, the existing curricular outlines and major and minor sequences 



78 



Mary Washington College 



are listed again in this issue of the catalogue for the guidance of 
students now enrolled and students transferring with advanced stand- 
ing from other institutions. 



Major Programs Offered. — Major 

the following fields : 



programs are offered in 



Art 


German 


Political Science 


Biology 


Greek 


and Sociology 


Chemistry 


History 


Portuguese 


Commerce 


Home Economics 


Psychology and 


Dramatic Arts 


Italian 


Philosophy 


and Speech 


Latin 


Russian 


Economics 


Mathematics 


Spanish 


English 


Music 


Technical Secretarial 


French 


Physical Education 





Degrees Conferred. — The Degree of Bachelor of Arts is con- 
ferred upon students completing degree requirements with major 
programs in Art, Biology, Chemistry, Dramatic Arts and Speech, 
Economics, English, French, German, Greek, History, Italian, Latin, 
Mathematics, Music, Political Science and Sociology, Portuguese, 
Psychology and Philosophy, Russian, and Spanish. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science is conferred upon students 
completing degree requirements with major programs in Commerce, 
Home Economics, Physical Education, and Technical Secretarial. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Music is conferred upon students 
completing the courses outlined under Curriculum VII-A or VII-B 
(See pages 96-99). 



Curricula I and II 79 



CURRICULA I AND II 

Curricula Leading to the A.B. and B.S. Degrees in 
the Arts and Sciences 

Curriculum I is a general program in the arts and sciences in 
which languages and related subjects are emphasized, and leads to 
the A.B. degree. The purposes of this curriculum are to offer a broad 
cultural education, and in addition meet the requirements of those 
who wish to enter professions for which the prerequisite is four years 
of college work of a general cultural nature. 

Curriculum II is a general program in which the emphasis is 
placed on the sciences and related fields, and leads to the B.S. degree. 
The purpose of this curriculum is to meet the requirements of those 
who desire a general college education in which the sciences pre- 
dominate. 

Pre-medical students should elect this curriculum, and are ad- 
vised to take two sciences each year in both the freshman and sopho- 
more years. 

Freshmen students enrolling in either Curriculum I or Cur- 
riculum II should refer to the new degree requirements outlined on 
the preceding pages. 



80 



Mary Washington College 



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84 Mary Washington College 



CURRICULUM III 
Medical or Technical Secretarial Course 

Secretarial training combined with biological training enables 
one to become an efficient secretary and laboratory assistant. 

Curriculum III leads to the Bachelor of Science degree, and is 
designed to prepare young women for the position of secretary of 
private physicians, dentists, directors of laboratories, directors of 
public health agencies, and other similar positions. Since this is a 
relatively new field of college training, the graduates of the course 
are assured of excellent opportunities for immediate employment. 

The secretarial training is given under the direction of the 
Department of Commerce, and consists of typewriting, shorthand 
involving technical terminology, principles of economics, accounting, 
office practice and management. 

The technical work is given by the Departments of Science and 
Dietetics and Home Economics, and consists of work in zoology, 
physiology, botany, chemistry, physics, bacteriology, bio-chemistry, 
health of the family and child study. Opportunities for practice in 
office laboratory routine are provided in the College Infirmary and 
offices of private physicians. 

The course is flexible, permitting substitutions wherever indi- 
vidual needs or circumstances dictate. 



Curriculum III 



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Curriculum IV 87 



CURRICULUM IV 
Pre-Professional or Foundation Courses 

In addition to the various liberal courses, specialized curricula, 
and professional offerings which may be completed here, provision 
is made for students who may desire fundamental and generalized 
courses as foundation work for the various professions in which 
women are most interested, such as nursing, health work, social 
work, library science, journalism, various types of research work, etc. 

Attention is called especially to this curriculum, which is a two- 
year course designed to provide a cultural and pre-professional edu- 
cation for students planning to enter professional schools and hos- 
pitals for training in nursing, dentistry, etc. 



88 



Mary Washington College 



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Curriculum V 89 

CURRICULUM V 

Commerce, Business and Secretarial Science 

Curriculum in Commerce, Leading to the Bachelor of 
Science Degree 

The demand for business workers, secretaries, and other spe- 
cialists in the field of Commerce is becoming more acute each year, 
and far exceeds the supply of college-trained workers available. The 
least crowded of all teaching fields is that of business or commerce 
in the high schools. 

This college has one of the strongest departments of Commerce 
in the country; has achieved a national reputation in this field; and 
is a member of the National Association of Business Teacher-Train- 
ing Institutions. 

The courses are designed: 

1. To meet the needs of those who desire a broad business edu- 
cation. 

2. For those who wish to prepare for secretarial positions. 

3. To prepare teachers of commercial or business subjects. 

4. For those who desire to prepare to become technical secretaries 
to private physicians, dentists, directors of laboratories, and 
other similar positions. 

Courses in Commerce are so organized that the student may 
begin this work in any quarter of the college session. It is not 
necessary to have had previous business training in order to take the 
commercial courses. 

Students not wishing to major or minor in Commerce but who 
desire to take courses in this field may include them as electives in 
any curriculum. 

Technical Secretarial Course 
Curriculum III, page 85, is designed to prepare young women 
for the position of secretary and laboratory assistant in the offices of 
physicians, dentists, public health agencies, clinics, etc. This eur- 
riculum leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



90 



Mary Washington College 



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92 Mary Washington College 



CURRICULUM VI 
Health and Physical Education 

Curriculum Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science 

The purposes of the Department of Health and Physical Edu- 
cation are (1) to build up and conserve health; (2) to develop 
grace and beauty; and (3) to impart skills in certain activities or 
sports which can be carried on throughout a major portion of adult 
life. 

Curriculum VI is a program designed to provide not only a 
background of general academic subjects but also those specialized 
courses in health and physical education that will best equip gradu- 
ates for positions of leadership in a field of constantly growing im- 
portance in the world of today. 



Curriculum VI 



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Curricula VII-A, VII-B, VII-C, and VII-D 95 



CURRICULA VII-A, VII-B, VII-C, and VII-D 

Music 

Curricula VII-A and VII-B are specialized programs of study 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music. Specific entrance re- 
quirements for these curricula are given on page 140. 

In addition to the Bachelor of Music degree with majors in 
Applied Music or School Music, the Department of Music also 
offers curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major 
in Applied Music (Curriculum VII-C) and the Bachelor of Science 
degree with a major in School Music (Curriculum VII-D). The 
entrance requirements for these curricula are the same as those for 
general admission to the college. Programs of study for these degrees 
are not given in outlined form, but the subjects required are listed 
on pages 141-142. 

Music forms an integral part of the work of the college. The 
aim is to teach music not only as an accomplishment, but also as an 
aid in the development of the highest type of womanhood. The inti- 
mate connection of the department with other departments of the 
college presents to the student opportunities of pursuing a well- 
rounded liberal education. Such a combination is strongly recom- 
mended from an educational point of view. The ultimate aim is to 
train for life, and to use the art of music as a means of intellectual, 
aesthetic, and moral culture. 

Student and faculty recitals and concerts by visiting artists 
offer advantages for music appreciation and study. The glee club, 
choral club, band, and orchestras afford opportunities for practical 
training and application of the principles of music. 

In addition to the regular Artists Course of the college, stu- 
dents have exceptional opportunities to hear the best operas and con- 
certs in Washington and Richmond. Each of these cities is only 
fifty miles away, and for groups it is possible to secure a reduction 
in transportation costs, as well as in the price of admission. 



96 



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Curriculum VIII 101 



CURRICULUM VIII 
Dietetics and Home Economics 

Curriculum VIII leads to the Bachelor of Science degree. It 
provides for a choice between preparation as a dietitian or manager 
of food service, as a home economist in business, or for homemaking. 

Candidates who meet the requirements of Curriculum VIII-B 
for dietitians and managers of food service comply with the require- 
ments of the American Dietetic Association and are eligible for 
entrance to approved courses in Hospital Dietetics. 

Students who wish to prepare for homemaking or for employ- 
ment as a home economist in business may choose VIII-C and are 
advised to select electives from courses in art, literature, music, dra- 
matics or speech, social science, or commerce in line with their special 
interests and needs. 

While numbers of college students look forward at least toward 
a period of business or professional work outside of the home, the 
majority will be confronted also with some form of actual home- 
making or housekeeping. Professional education closely allied to the 
home enables the student to prepare herself more adequately for her 
modern dual capacity of wage earner and homemaker than is possi- 
ble in any other field of education. 

The Home Economics curriculum places special emphasis on 
food and nutrition because of the growing recognition of their im- 
portance in relation to health and the need of scientifically trained 
dietitians and nutritionists by health, educational, and commercial 
agencies. 

Laboratories for home economics courses are provided in Chan- 
dler Hall. The college kitchen and dining rooms as well as the 
College Shoppe serve as laboratories for excellent practical experience 
in institutional management courses. 

Richmond, Washington, and Baltimore offer exceptional oppor- 
tunities to visit governmental and public service agencies, hospitals, 
cafeterias, and lunch rooms. 



102 



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Departments of Instruction and 
Course Offerings 



The work of the college is organized into fifteen major de- 
partments, as follows: 

Art 

Commerce, business, and secretarial 

Dietetics and Home Economics 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 

Education 

Psychology and Philosophy 

English, Journalism 

Library Science 

Foreign Languages 

History 

Social Science (political science, sociology, economics, and 

geography) 
Mathematics 
Music 

Physical and Health Education 

Science (astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, physics) 
Course offerings are listed under these headings in the above 
order on the pages that follow. 

Course Numbers. — Courses numbered from 100 to 199, in- 
clusive, are first year courses; 200 to 299 are second year courses; 
courses 300 to 399 are third year courses; and those with numbers 
400 and above are designed for fourth year students. 

Students are not permitted to enroll for courses that are more 
than one year above or below their classification. 

ART 

Professor Brown 

Associate Professors Duggan, Faulkner 

Assistant Professors Schnellock, McDermott 

The courses in art are planned to encourage and develop the 
young artist, as well as to give guidance in the observation and 



Art 107 

enjoyment of beauty in the world of art and everyday surroundings. 
Classes are offered in painting, drawing, design, sculpture, or history 
of art. 

Art may be selected as a major or minor by students working 
toward the A.B. or B.S. degree. Requirements for a major, a mini- 
mum of 36 quarter hours; for a minor, a minimum of 27 quarter 
hours. 

Students who have had work in art in high school or with 
private teachers before coming to college are requested to bring sam- 
ples of work. 

If students are prepared to do so, they may carry certain first 
and second year classes together the first year. 

Art 101-102-103. Drawing and Design. A beginner's course in 
which emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles of drawing, de- 
sign, and color and on the development of skill in those fields as well as on 
free experimentation with ideas and mediums as a basis for growth in crea- 
tive expression. Two double periods a week for the session. Two credits 
each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Art HI 01. Drawing and Design. An introductory course for stu- 
dents specializing in Home Economics. Similar to the first quarter of Art 
101 but with the adaptation of problems to the needs of this group. Three 
double periods a week for the first quarter. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 111-112-113. Art Appreciation. A survey of great periods in 
architecture, sculpture, painting, and the graphic arts. Three single periods 
a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each quarter. 

Art 211-212-213. Figure Sketching and Composition. Pre- 
requisite: Art 101-102-103 or equivalent. A course in drawing and design, 
emphasizing figure sketching from the costumed model ; creative composition 
in charcoal, ink, pastel and other mediums; portrait. Three double periods 
a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Art 218-219. Photography. Instruction and practice in the artistic, 
optical, and mechanical principles involved in the taking and enlarging of 
photographs; practice in camera techniques with emphasis on composition, 
lighting, portraiture, and flash-photography. Art 218 is a prerequisite for 
Art 219. Two double periods a week. Two credits each quarter. Fee, 
$3.00 each quarter. 

Art 224. Commercial Art. Prerequisite: one or more first or second 
year drawing and design courses or the equivalent. An introductory course 
in the commercial application of drawing and design, stressing advertising 
mediums and materials. Instruction and practice are given in lettering, 
poster design, and advertising layouts. Three double periods a week for 
second quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Art 226. Woodblock Designing and Printing. Prerequisite: one 
first year class^ in drawing and design or the equivalent. This course in- 
cludes the designing, cutting, and printing of woodcuts in one or more 
colors and the development of skill in expressing ideas in this form of graphic 
arts. Three double periods a week for the second quarter. Three credits. 
Fee, $2.00. 



108 Mary Washington College 

Art 231-232-233. Modeling. An introductory course designed for 
students without previous experience. A study is made, through practice, 
of the creative possibilities of plastic mediums and the processes involved 
in sculpture. Three double periods a week for the session. Two credits 
each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Art 241-242-243. Painting and Composition. Prerequisite: Art 
101-102-103 or the equivalent. A course in drawing and painting including 
work in figure construction, composition, and outdoor sketching. Three dou- 
ble periods a week for the session. Two credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 
each quarter. 

Art 301-302-303. History of Architecture. A survey of world 
architecture from ancient to contemporary times. Three single periods a 
week for the session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each quarter. 

Art 312. Home Decoration. A general consideration of the prin- 
ciples of design and color as applied to the selection and arrangement of 
home furnishings with a brief study of historic styles and their appropriate 
adaptation for modern use. Three single periods a week for the third 
quarter. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 323. Costume Design. A study of the principles of design and 
color in relation to the selection of garments and their accessories, and to 
the designing of costumes for special occasions. Three single periods a week 
for second quarter. Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Art 324. History of Costume. A comprehensive survey of cos- 
tume and its historical development. Three single periods a week for second 
quarter. Three credits. 

Art 331-332-333. Mural Painting and Composition. Prerequisite: 
One or more classes in drawing and design or the equivalent. Figure draw- 
ing, composition, and creative design as applied to the making of full size 
sketches and the completion of actual murals. Three double periods a week 
for the session. Two credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Art 341-342-343. Sculpture. Prerequisite: Art 231-232-233 or the 
equivalent. A creative study of plastic and sculptural problems. Practical 
instruction and experience in casting and mould making. Three double 
periods a week for the session. Two credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each 
quarter. 

Art 351-352-353. Oil Painting and Composition. Prerequisite: Art 
241-242-243 or Art 211-212-213 or the equivalent. Still-life; portrait sketch; 
landscape; original compositions. Three double periods a week for the ses- 
sion. Two credit each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Art 401-402-403. Oil Painting and Composition. Prerequisite: Art 
351-352-353 or the equivalent. Emphasis is placed on improved technique 
and expression of ideas in still-life, portrait, figure construction, and land- 
scape. Three double periods a week for the session. Two credits each 
quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Art 421-422-423. History of Art. Open to any Junior or Senior. 
First quarter: a brief survey of architecture and sculpture from ancient 
times to the present. Second quarter: a brief survey of European painting 
from the Italian Renaissance through Modern French. Third quarter: a 
brief study of the development and present tendencies of architecture, sculp- 
ture, and painting in America, including artists now living. Three single 
periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $1.00 
each quarter. 



Commerce 109 

Art 441-442-443. Sculptural Composition and Portraiture. Pre- 
requisite: Art 341-342-343 or the equivalent. Decorative and structural 
design as related to sculptural composition. Practice in figure construction, 
anatomy, portraiture, and related problems. Three double periods a week 
for the session. Two credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 



COMMERCE 

Professor J. H. Dodd 

Associate Professors Roach, *R. M. Kirby, Hiatt 

Assistant Professors Miller, Tompkins, Sublette, *Nicks, 

Winifred Weiss, Aldo Charles, Derryberry 

Instructors Bine, Gaither 

Beginning classes in typewriting, shorthand, and bookkeeping 
are offered each quarter, so that the student may enter these courses 
any quarter in the college session. 

Requirements for a major in Commerce 

Completion of Curriculum V (pages ) is required for 

a major in Commerce. 

Requirements for a minor in Commerce 

Qr. Hrs. 

(a) Com. 111-112-113, Shorthand 9 

Com. 211-212-213, Shorthand 9 

Com. 121-122-123, Typewriting 6 

Com. 221-222, Typewriting 4 

or 

(b) Com. 121-122-123, Typewriting 6 

Com. 221-222, Typewriting 4 

Com. 201-202-203, Accounting 9 

Com. 301-302-303, Accounting 9 

Commerce 111. Shorthand. The Functional Method of Gregg short- 
hand is taught. Books I and II of the Functional Method are used. The 
following minimum standards must be attained: (1) a reading rate of one 
hundred words a minute on practice material; (2) a thorough knowledge 
of brief forms; (3) ability to transcribe satisfactorily from plate material. 
Five periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 112. Shorthand. Books II and III of the Functional 
Method are used. Minimum standards to be attained are (1) a reading 
rate of one hundred and twenty-five words a minute; (2) a thorough knowl- 
edge of brief and special forms; (3) ability to take dictation for five min- 
utes at forty words a minimum from unfamiliar material with ninety-five 
per cent accuracy. Five periods a week for second quarter. Three credits, 

♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



110 Mary Washington College 

Commerce 113. Shorthand. Book III of Functional Method is com- 
pleted. Dictation is given at speeds varying from sixty to one hundred 
words a minute. Tests must be transcribed back with not less than ninety- 
five per cent accuracy. A minimum reading rate of one hundred and 
twenty-five words a minute must be attained. Five periods a week for third 
quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 121. Typewriting. The proper techniques of typewriting 
and a mastery of the keyboard are developed during this quarter. Students 
are taught the various parts of the typewriter and the care of the machine. 
Five periods a week for first quarter. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 122. Typewriting. The form and content of a business 
letter, addressing envelopes, centering, tabulation, and elementary filing 
of carbon copies are emphasized. Remedial testing and drills form a part 
of this course. Five periods a week for second quarter. Two credits. Fee, 
$3.00. 

Commerce 123. Typewriting. Special stress is placed upon perfect- 
ing techniques necessary for accuracy and speed in typewriting. Instruction 
is given in tabulation and manuscript writing, and familiarity with business 
forms is developed. To receive credit for the course, the student must at- 
tain a minimum speed of thirty-five words per minute for ten minutes. 
Five periods a week for third quarter. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 133. Office and Secretarial Practice. Prerequisite: 
Typewriting speed of thirty-five net words per minute. This course con- 
sists of demonstrations, lectures, readings, and machine practice. It is in- 
tended to give the student a working knowledge of dictating and tran- 
scribing machines, duplicating devices and machines, adding and listing 
machines, posting machines, addressing machines, calculating machines, 
and miscellaneous office appliances. Four laboratory periods and one lec- 
ture period a week. Offered each quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 201. Accounting. This course is devoted to the develop- 
ment of the fundamental principles of accounting and to the application 
of these principles in the keeping of the books of professional and personal 
service enterprises on the cash basis. Topics covered include: theory of 
debit and credit; the function of business papers; books of original entry; 
general and special ledgers; financial reports; and investments. Three 
periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 202. Accounting. The first part of this course is devoted 
to the working of a practice set kept on the cash basis. The second part 
of the course is a study of merchandise accounting on the accrual basis. 
The topics treated include: accounting for merchandise; fixed assets and 
deferred charges; accounting for negotiable instruments; and controlling 
accounts and subsidiary ledgers. Three periods a week for second quarter. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 203. Accounting. This course is a continuation of mer- 
cantile accounting. It includes the following topics: types of business own- 
ership; additional mercantile accounts and records; adjusting, proving, and 
classifying accounts; financial statements; and accounting for taxes. Three 
periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 211. Shorthand. This course trains the student to take 
dictation from unfamiliar matter at rates varying from eighty to one hun- 
dred words a minute for five minutes, and to transcribe with a degree 
of accuracy of not less than ninety-five per cent. Attention is given to 
arrangement, spelling, punctuation, syllabication, etc. Daily transcripts are 
required. Five periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 



Commerce 111 

Commerce 212. Shorthand. In this course the objectives of the first 
quarter are continued, with increased emphasis upon the development of 
speed and accuracy in taking dictation and in transcription. Five periods 
a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 213. Shorthand. The work of the two preceding quarters 
is continued. Dictation is given at rates varying from one hundred to 
one hundred and fifty words a minute. To receive credit for the course, 
the minimum speed requirements of one hundred words a minute for five 
minutes and one hundred and twenty words a minute for three minutes 
must be attained, with a transcription speed of at least twenty-five words 
a minute and at least ninety-five per cent accuracy. Five periods a week 
for third quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 221. Typewriting. Development of speed and accuracy 
in typewriting is stressed. The student is also trained in tabulation, legal 
work, business forms, etc. Standard tests are given during the quarter. To 
receive credit for the course, the student must attain a minimum speed of 
forty words per minute for fifteen minutes. Five periods a week for first 
quarter. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 222. Typewriting. This course is a continuation of the 
preceding quarter's work. The student is taught to fold, bind, and endorse 
legal documents; to set up tabulated reports; to take dictation at the 
machine ; and to write correctly and arrange attractively manuscripts and 
continuous articles. To receive credit for the course, the student must at- 
tain a minimum speed of forty-five words per minute for fifteen minutes. 
Five periods a week for second quarter. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 233. Advanced Office Practice and Management. Pre- 
requisite: Commerce 133. This course provides an opportunity for acquir- 
ing an operating skill in one of the following phases of office work: machine 
dictation and transcription, machine calculation, machine bookkeeping, and 
comptometry. A comprehensive study is made of the organizational and man- 
agerial aspects of office work, types of positions, duties of office employees, 
and personnel problems. Four laboratory periods and one lecture period 
a week. Offered each quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Commerce 236. Advanced Correspondence Filing. This is a 
course in theory and practice in indexing and filing. A study is made of 
filing rules and their applications; card filing; methods of alphabetical cor- 
respondence filing; cross-reference methods; geographic correspondence 
filing; subject filing; transfer methods; follow-up methods; the filing and 
storing of supplies; filing equipment and filing supplies; and visible record 
filing. Three periods a week. Offered each quarter. Three credits. Fee, 
$3.00. 

Commerce 301. Advanced Accounting. In this course the nature 
and characteristics of the business corporation are studied, and accounting 
principles are used in the recording of conditions and transactions affecting 
corporate accounts. The topics covered include: nature and characteristics 
of the corporation; corporation accounts and records; corporate earnings 
and surplus; corporation securities. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Three credits. 

Commerce 302. Advanced Accounting. This course is an introduc- 
tion to cost accounting. Some consideration is also given to consolidated 
statements. The topics include: accounting for manufacturing; cost ac- 
counting; process and distributive costs; departmental accounting; branch 
accounting; consolidated statements. Three periods a week for second quar- 
ter. Three credits. 



112 Mary Washington College 

Commerce 303. Advanced Accounting. In general, the aim in this 
course is application of accounting principles in the analysis and inter- 
pretation of accounting statements. Some attention is given to budgeting 
and accounting for taxes. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three 
credits. 

Commerce 313. Intermediate Stenography. This course is designed 
to give the student an opportunity to maintain her established speed and 
to serve as a connecting link between advanced shorthand and advanced 
stenography. Advanced phrase writing is introduced and special study 
is made of the best methods of increasing speed in both shorthand and 
transcription. A minimum speed of one hundred and ten words a minute 
is required. Three periods a week for the first quarter. Repeated second 
quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 331. Business* Experience. The completion of eight 
weeks' successful business experience is required. It may be done during the 
summer, although there are no restrictions as to the time of the year. The 
head of the department must be furnished with a report from the employer 
as to: (1) the length of service of the student; (2) kind of work performed; 
and (3) quality of service rendered. 

Commerce 401. Business Organization. This course is a brief sur- 
vey of modern methods of efficient organization, including the study of or- 
ganization charts, methods of financing an enterprise, selecting a site, pur- 
chasing, selling and advertising, problems of management, wages, hours, 
sanitation, welfare, etc. Frequent class discussions are based upon required 
readings in current literature and periodicals. Three periods a week for 
first quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 402. Money and Banking. The approach to the subject 
is made through a study of money as a medium of exchange, after which 
consideration is given to banking and its processes. Emphasis is on the func- 
tioning of present-day commercial banking. Some of the topics treated are: 
Banking functions, nature of commercial banking, collections, reserves, the 
Federal Reserve System, note issues, loans and discounts, deposits, agricul- 
tural credit, and the bank statement. Three periods a week for second 
quarter. Three credits. % 

Commerce 403. Employment Relations in Business and Indus, 
try. This is a study of employer-employee relationships in business and in- 
dustry. Special attention is given to the topics of personnel management, 
women in business and industry, employer and employee associations, and 
government and labor. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three 
credits. 

Commerce 413. Advanced Stenography. This course is designed to 
afford an opportunity for advanced work in shorthand and typewriting. 
The work includes rapid dictation and transcription and a review of dif- 
ficult shorthand words and phrases, as well as a continued study of ad- 
vanced phrase writing. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three 
credits. 

Commerce 426. Business Law. The objects of this and the following 
course in business law are: (1) to prepare students to teach business law 
in high schools and (2) to give prospective business workers an intelligent 
understanding of the more common legal aspects of all business trans- 
actions. Work in this quarter covers the subjects of the nature and ad- 
ministration of law, property, contracts, agency, employer and employee, 
negotiable instruments, and suretyship. Three periods a week for second 
quarter. Three credits. 



Home Economics 113 



Commerce 427. Business Law. This is a continuation of the preced- 
ing course in business law. Attention is confined largely to the following 
frequent applications of law to business: insurance, bailments, carriers, sales, 
deeds of conveyance, liens, partnerships, corporations, and landlords and 
tenants. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Commerce 428. Marketing. The objects of the course are (1) to 
develop a knowledge of the functions of marketing and of the methods 
and agents employed in the distribution of goods and services and; (2) an 
appreciation of the significance of marketing practices and problems to the 
consumer. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 



DIETETICS AND HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Edwards 

Associate Professor Harrison 

Assistant Professors Johnston, Turner 

Instructors Scranton, Price, Baughan 

Dietitians, Miss Taylor, Mrs. Ruff, Miss Ogle 

The program offered in the Department of Dietetics and 
Home Economics serves several purposes. First, it provides the 
training and experience of a pre-professional type which is deemed 
necessary and desirable in the field of dietetics. The program for 
dietetic training offered in the Department meets the requiremnts 
of the American Dietetic Association and for entrance to approved 
courses in Hospital Dietetics. 

The second purpose of the program is to afford training for 
homemaking. This training is of value to those employed by either 
commercial or non-commercial agencies serving the home and family. 

In addition, candidates for a Bachelor of Science degree who 
select a major in some other department may, in certain instances, 
select a minor in Home Economics. The requirements for a minor 
in Home Economics are: 

Qr.Hrs. 

Home Economics 101, 102, 103, Foods 9 

Home Economics 111, 112, 113, Textiles and Clothing 9 

Home Economics 223, Home Management 3 

Home Economics 241, Health of the Family 3 

Home Economics 242, Child Study 3 



Science 121, 122, 123, Biology, and Art H101, Drawing and 
Design, are required of all students minoring in home economics. 



114 Mary Washington College 

Home Economics 101-102-103. Foods and Nutrition. Elements of 
nutrition with reference to the nutritive needs of individuals, especially the 
college girl; the influence of diet on health. Food economics and the funda- 
mental principles of food preparation. An introduction to experimental 
methods and to planning and serving meals. One single and two double 
periods a week. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 

Home Economics 111-112-113. Textiles and Clothing. Weaves, 
design in fabrics, factors affecting price and influencing the suitability of 
fabrics for various uses. Fundamental principles of selection, construction, 
renovation, repair and fitting of garments. Study of commercial patterns 
and principles of creative individual dress design. One single and two 
double periods a week. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Home Economics 223. Home Management. Selection of the house; 
objectives of the home; management of time, energy, and money from the 
standpoint of family needs; selection, planning, and care of equipment. 
Two single and one double period for second quarter. Three credits. Fee, 
$2.00. 

Home Economics 241. Health of the Family. Conditions related to 
the health of the family, home and community sanitation, home care of the 
sick. Three single periods for third quarter. Three credits. 

Home Economics 242. Child Study. Physical, mental and social de- 
velopment of the child from the standpoint of care and guidance. Ob- 
servation and study of pre-school children of the community. Two single 
and one double period for third quarter. Three credits. 

Home Economics 303. Food Service. Prerequisites: Home Eco- 
nomics 101-102-103, or equivalent. Planning and serving meals for a family 
of average size on different economic levels. Planning and serving ban- 
quets and special affairs such as high school home economics teachers are 
asked to supervise. One single and two double periods for first quarter. 
Three credits. Fee, $3.00 

Home Economics 311-312-313. Home Economics for Elementary 
Teachers. Gives a background in food, nutrition, clothing, and shelter 
that will assist the elementary teacher in handling the problems of the ele- 
mentary school child. Credit in this course may not be applied on either 
a minor or a major in home economics. One single and two double periods 
for first quarter. Three single periods for second and third quarters. Three 
credits each quarter. Fee, $3.00 first quarter. 

Home Economics 320. Family Economics. Standards of living, 
community resources, family incomes, patterns of expenditure, with em- 
phasis on the family of moderate income. Three single periods a week for 
first quarter. Three credits. 

Home Economics 340. Costume Design. Prerequisite: Art 101, 
Home Economics 111-112. Development of an appreciation of good design 
in dress. Designing costumes for different types of figures and for dif- 
ferent purposes. Two double and one single periods for the second quarter. 
Three credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Home Economics 341. Home Furnishing and Decoration. Pre- 
requisite: Art 101. Home furnishing from the point of view of art, dif- 
ferent income levels, social needs, and distinctive characteristics of the 
family. Two laboratory and one lecture periods for third quarter. Three 
credits. Fee, $2.00. 



Home Economics 115 



Home Economics 351. Quantity Cookery. Prerequisites :^ Home 
Economics 101-102-103, or equivalent. For students majoring in dietetics. 
Laboratory work in the kitchen of the college dining halls, the department 
laboratories, and the College Shoppe. Two double and one single period 
for second quarter. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 352. Experimental Cookery. Prerequisites: Home 
Economics 101-102-103, or equivalent. Methods of food preparation crit- 
ically analyzed. Standard recipes are developed and scientific principles 
are applied. Two double periods for first quarter. Two credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 400. Home Management Residence. Prerequi- 
sites: Home Economics 223, 303, 421. Coordination of the various phases 
of home economics education, training and experience in the many activities 
involved in home management. Residence required in the Home Manage- 
ment House. Offered each quarter. Six credits. Fee, $4.00. 

Home Economics 403. Consumer Education. Problems involved 
in the selection and purchase of goods and services required by individuals 
and families, sources of information, government and other agencies serving 
consumers, and social responsibilities of consumers. Two single and one 
double period for third quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 413. Advanced Clothing. Advanced work in cre- 
ative designing and draping of garments; selection of line, material, and 
color in clothing to enhance personality and appearance of the individual. 
One single and two double periods for third quarter. Three credits. Fee, 
$3.00. 

Home Economics 421. Nutrition for the Family. Nutritional needs 
of the individual members and of the family group. One single and two 
double periods for second quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Home Economics 423. Diet in Disease. Prerequisites: Home Eco- 
nomics 241, 242, 421. The application and modification of normal dietaries 
to meet the demands under abnormal conditions. One single and one 
double period for first quarter. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Home Economics 450. Supervised Practice in Institutional Man- 
agement and Commercial Food Service. The College Shoppe, main 
dining halls, and kitchen are usual as laboratories. Six double periods a 
week. Offered each quarter. Six credits. 

Home Economics 453. Problems in Nutrition. Survey of both 
popular and technical current literature on nutrition covering the fields of 
general nutrition, child nutrition, and diet in disease. Three periods a week 
for second quarter. Three credits. 

Home Economics 460. Institutional Accounting and Records. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 351-352. Practice in the setting up of 
managerial records used by cafeterias, tea rooms, hospital food departments, 
and other food organizations and the study of the fundamental principles 
of accounting used in the keeping of these records. Two double periods 
for second quarter. Two credits. 

Home Economics 461. Institutional Economics. Prerequisite: 
Home Economics 351, 450, 460. -Problems and theory of institutional man- 
agement relative to personnel, types of work, scheduling and dispatching of 
work. Institutional buying and accounting, renewal costs, and care of equip- 
ment. One single and two double periods a week for third quarter. Three 
credits. 

For Principles of Teaching Home Economics and Supervised Teaching 
for vocational home economics education students, see page 118. 



116 Mary Washington College 

DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH 

Assistant Professors Harold H. Weiss, Charles, Ritter 

The study of dramatic arts and speech techniques may be valu- 
able in many ways. Students obtain from these subjects means to 
control and improve the voice, general bearing, and personality. 
Speech is a major tool in fashioning success educationally and so- 
cially. Majors in this field learn the art forms of dramatic litera- 
ture, and become candid and competent critics of their own speech. 

Students may equip themselves to direct and stage school or 
little theatre productions, or the course may be used as a stepping- 
stone to the professional phases of the speech arts, such as acting, 
directing, radio, stage design, and playwriting. 

The Mary Washington Players, an organization composed of 
students who have demonstrated dramatic ability, produces at least 
three full-length plays each year, plus many original and profes- 
sional one-act plays. The group also sponsors trips to Washington 
and Richmond to witness some of the best theatrical productions. 
Eta Eta chapter of Alpha Psi Omega has been established for stu- 
dents who do outstanding work in the several phases of the dramatic 
arts. • 

Mary Washington College is equipped with three theatres 
and a modern broadcasting and recording studio. The auditorium 
in George Washington Hall seats 1,624 persons and has the most 
modern equipment available for stage presentations. The Little 
Theatre in Monroe Hall is used for classroom work and experimental 
productions. The Woodland Theatre is used frequently during 
the spring and summer for pageants, May Fetes, and open-air per- 
formances. The broadcasting studio has been fitted with the best 
in recording equipment. It is wired directly to Station WFVA so 
that programs can be transmitted to state and national hook-ups. 

Requirements for a major in Dramatic Arts and Speech 
A minimum of thirty-six quarter hours distributed as follows: 

Qr. Hrs. 

Speech 231-232-233 Effective Speech 9 

Three junior or senior courses in Dramatic Arts and Speech 27 



Dramatic Arts and Speech 117 

Requirements for a minor in Dramatic Arts and Speech 

A minimum of twenty-seven quarter hours distributed as fol- 
lows: 

Qr. Hrs. 

Speech 231-232-233 Effective Speech 9 

Two junior or senior courses in Dramatic Arts and Speech 18 

Dramatic Arts 

Dramatic Arts 331-332-333. Survey of World Theatre. A world 
survey of drama, actors, and theatre in modern, primitive, and ancient cul- 
tures. A study of selected plays, representing the periods of major sig- 
nificance in theatrical history, including plays of the twentieth century. 
Theatre trips to Washington and Richmond to be arranged. Three periods 
a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Dramatic Arts 371-372-373. Acting. Prerequisite: Speech 231-232- 
233 or consent of the instructor. The general principles of acting; elemen- 
tary work in voice and pantomime ; improvisation ; development of character 
p itrayal; consideration of individual and group problems; advanced prob- 
lems in rehearsal and public performance. Three periods a week for the 
session, and participation in college productions to be arranged. Three 
credits each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 

Dramatic Arts 375-376-377. Playwriting. Writing long and short 
plays, sketches, radio continuity, and movie scenario. Consideration of char- 
acter development, plot structure, dialogue, markets, and marketing. Op- 
portunity will be given for production of selected student-written plays. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Dramatic Arts 411-412-413. Design and Production. The prob- 
lems of the stage director and producer. The design of the entire produc- 
tion; grouping and ensemble; correlation of acting and stage decor. 
Problems of business and stage management; scene construction, lighting, 
costume, make-up. Opportunities will be given for experience in producing 
public performances. Three periods a week for the session. Three credits 
each quarter. 

Speech 

Speech 231-232-233. Effective Speech. A beginning course in the 
principles of effective speech. Careful consideration is given to speech 
difficulties, to the development of purity and resonance of tone, correct 
posture, and pleasing, effective diction. Records are made for all students. 
Oral interpretation of literature, monologue, voice-choir, and story-telling 
are stressed as well as types of speech-making. Three periods a week for 
the session. Three credits per quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 

Speech 361-362-363. Radio Broadcasting. Techniques of radio 
speech and program preparation. History of broadcasting; study of art 
forms basic to radio. Announcing and script preparation. Practice in the 
participation and preparation of radio broadcasts and recordings in the 
college studios. Three periods a week for the session. Program time to be 
ananged. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 



118 Mary Washington College 

Speech 421. Speech Composition. Methods of preparation and de- 
livery of various types of speech. Three periods a week for third quarter. 
Three credits. 

Speech 461-462-463. Advanced Radio Broadcasting. A continua- 
tion of the techniques of radio speech and program preparation, including 
the elements of engineering and radio law leading to Radiotelephony license. 
Program time to be arranged. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each 
quarter. 

EDUCATION 

Professors Alvey, 'Eileen K. Dodd, *Martin 

Associate Professor Graves 

Assistant Professor Ritter 

Superintendent Fredericksburg Public Schools, Mr. Guy H. Brown 

Supervisors 

The Department of Education offers a limited number of elec- 
tive courses in this field. The courses listed below are available for 
the session of 1945-46. 

Education 311-312-313. Elementary Education. A course in prin- 
ciples and procedures of elementary school instruction. Attention is given to 
the elementary school child and his individual and social needs, the selec- 
tion and organization of instructional materials, the direction and appraisal 
of pupil growth, and problems of classroom organization and control. This 
course is prerequisite to directed teaching in the elementary grades. Three 
periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Education 321-322-323. Secondary Education. A course in prin- 
ciples and procedures of secondary school instruction. Attention is given to 
the principles and purposes of secondary education, the selection and or- 
ganization of instructional materials, the direction and evaluation of pupil 
progress, and classroom organization and control. Three periods a week 
for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Education 335. Principles of Teaching — Home Economics. Pro- 
cedures and problems in the teaching of home economics are given in- 
tensive consideration. Various types of home economics courses are evalu- 
ated. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Education 340. In-Service Teaching. Available to teachers in serv- 
ice for professional growth and for credit which may be applied toward the 
extension, renewal or raising of a certificate, or toward a degree. Enroll- 
ment subject to the approval of local Division Superintendent of Schools and 
Elementary Supervisor who is a joint instructor for the course. Course 
lasts the entire school session. Nine credits. Fee, $25.00. 

Education 411-412-413. History and Philosophy of Education. 

The primary intent is to make a study of the social structures of modern 
society and the psychological and philosophical background underlying 
current educational programs. In order properly to evaluate both the 
methods and the procedures involved, a study of social needs and^ a critical 
evaluation of the philosophical viewpoints involved are made. Six periods 
a week for a semester. The course is repeated each semester. Nine credits. 

♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Psychology and Philosophy 119 

Education 440. Supervised Teaching. In the senior year students 
teach under supervision in the subjects in which they are majoring. This 
work is done under conditions similar to those under which graduates will 
likely teach after completing the course. Weekly conferences constitute 
part of the teaching credit. Offered each semester. Nine credits. 

Education 450. Apprentice Teaching. This involves observing and 
working with a superior teacher in a carefully selected school of the State. 
Assistance rendered the superior teacher may include routine classroom 
activities such as keeping records and reports, assisting pupils in specific 
situations, improving the appearance of the school, attending faculty meet- 
ings, and assuming responsibility for selected phases of the instructional 
program. The apprentice teacher resides in the community and participates 
in the community life during the entire quarter. Room and board for the 
apprentice teacher is paid by the college. This work is supervised closely 
by the Director of the Apprentice Teaching Program and by the county 
elementary supervisor. Offered each quarter. Fifteen credits. 

Education 460. Educational Research. During the period of ap- 
prenticeship, the apprentice teacher shall select some educational problem 
related to the school or community to which she is assigned. Such prob- 
lems as retardation, drop-outs, vocational education, instructional materials, 
pupil records, evaluation of the outcomes of instruction, and motivation 
may be undertaken for study. Experimental situations may be developed 
to try out specific educational methods or materials. The problem under- 
taken for research must be approved by the Director of the Apprentice 
Teaching Program, the elementary supervisor, and the superior teacher. 
At the conclusion of the study, the student will be expected to make a com- 
prehensive report on the purpose of the research, the method used, and the 
results obtained. Taken contemporaneously with Education 450. Offered 
each quarter. Two credits. 



PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY 

Professors Drake, Eileen K. Dodd, *Martin 

Assistant Professor Ritter 

Instructor **Williams 

The Department of Psychology and Philosophy serves an im- 
portant function in the institution. The Department seeks to give 
to the student a sound scholarship in the cultural field and a sound 
philosophy of life and values in complete living. 

Requirements for a major in Psychology and Philosophy, 36 
quarter hours; for a minor, 27 quarter hours. Requirements for a 
major in Psychology, 36 quarter hours in Psychology; for a minor, 
27 quarter hours. 

Phychology 218-219-220. General Psychology. A course giving 
the student an introduction to the subject matter, fields, methods, and re- 
sults of psychology. The student is given an insight into his own personal- 
ity and abilities through self-inventories, psychological tests, and group ex- 



* Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 
♦♦Absent on leave, 1944-45. 



120 Mary Washington College 

periraents. Prerequisite to all courses in psychology and philosophy. Three 
periods a week for session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each 
quarter. 

Psychology 318. Child Psychology. In this course the development 
of children in behavior, attitudes, and their mental life is considered in 
relation to social environmental controls. The genetic method of approach 
is utilized in connection with the child's emotional and moral controls, 
mental and physical hygiene, and individual personality traits. Three 
periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Psychology 319. Adolescent Psychology. The main problems of 
this important period in life are discussed. Principles of self-discovery and 
guidance are developed. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three 
credits. 

Psychology 320. Business Psychology. A study of the principles 
of psychology applied to problems of business efficiency, personnel, em- 
ployment, and morale. Recent developments are rapidly bringing this field 
of psychology into prominence. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Three credits. 

Psychology 325. Applied Psychology. A summary of the signif- 
icant applications of psychology in the fields of motivation, personal efficiency, 
individual differences, personality, and in various professions. Offered al- 
ternate years. Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Psychology 332-333. Social Psychology. The nature and develop- 
ment of group behavior are analyzed with respect to their influences on the 
individual. The casual factors of social attitudes, crowd phenomena, fash- 
ions, fads, suggestion, and leadership are considered. Three periods a 
week for first and second quarters. Three credits each quarter. 

Psychology 334. Experimental Psychology. A course in which 
group and individual investigations are conducted. The student will be 
familiarized with laboratory techniques, methods, and results. Offered al- 
ternate years. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 
Fee, $3.00 

Psychology 335. Psychology of Music. A consideration of the 
nature of musical talent and its measurement; the psychology of musical 
composition, appreciation and learning; the influence of music on behavior; 
and the problem of musical expressiveness. Offered alternate years. Three 
periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Psychology 340. Psychological Problems. Special and persistent 
problems that are significant in human relationships are considered. Ex- 
trasensory perception, suggestion and hypnosis, social betterment, war and 
peace, minority groups, social movements, and the psychology of art and 
literature are examples of topics. Offered alternate years. Three periods 
a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Psychology 341-342. Mental Hygiene. An analysis of the under- 
lying causes of mental and emotional maladjustments and the major forms 
of deviating behavior. Emphasis is placed upon a program of preventive 
measures. Three periods a week for first and second quarters. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Psychology 343. Abnormal Psychology. A study of the causes, 
forms, and treatment of abnormal mental states. An enriched insight into 
normal behavior is gained through a study of exaggerated deviations. Of- 
fered alternate years. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three 
credits. 



English 121 



Psychology 433. Psychological Measurement. The uses, develop- 
ment, and value of tests of general and special abilities are considered. 
The test movement is critically analyzed to determine the validity of many 
present day concepts. The role of tests in vocational, educational, and 
individual guidance is evaluated. Offered alternate years. Three periods 
a week for third quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Philosophy 411-412-413. See Education 411-412-413. 

Philosophy 415. Ethics. Moral ideas and customs are examined to 
ascertain the underlying standards of conduct. On this foundation, the 
moral values are related to those of aesthetics and epistemology. A con- 
structive social philosophy of human living is sought as the outcome of the 
course. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Philosophy 416. Introduction to Philosophy. The working con- 
cepts of natural and social science are examined in the light of critical philo- 
sophical theory. Some attention is given to the various schools of philosophy 
and their relations to the latest discoveries in the various fields of science. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Philosophy 417. History of Philosophy. The historical method 
is used in evaluating successive systems of philosophy in the belief that each 
successive system contains the corrective for the preceding systems. The 
social values are stressed giving coherence to a constructive philosophy of 
individual living. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 



ENGLISH 

Professors Shankle, J. P. Kirby, Baker, Whidden 

Assistant Professors Arms, *Whitesell, McKenzie, *Vogelback, 

W. W. Griffith, Baughan, LeClair 

Instructors *Anderson, Caverlee 

There is no subject in the curriculum which is more funda- 
mental than English, because every department of instruction is 
affected by it and finds its work strengthened or weakened as the 
work in English is strong or weak, English being the medium 
through which every department of the college must do its work. 

Through courses in English, students are enabled to develop 
mastery of the English language for use in life situations; to make 
habitual the use of clear and flexible sentence structure; to acquire 
a serviceable vocabulary; to master the elements of interest; and 
to organize material for the purpose of effectively reaching an 
audience. 

The courses in literature are designed to enable students to read 
with enjoyment and appreciation the writings of both past and con- 



* Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



122 Mary Washington College 

temporary authors, and to comprehend the meaning and to catch 
the inspiration of the masterpieces of all ages. In all courses in 
literature special attention is given to interpretation and to the so- 
cial, moral, religious, political, educational, and literary movements 
depicted in the literature studied 

Requirements for a major in English 

Qr. Hrs. 

English 115-116-117 9 

English 261-262-263 9 

English 318 or 319 , 3 

English 352 or 353 3 

English 354 or 405 3 

English 401 or 402 3 

English 407 or 408 3 

English 415 or 421 3 

Requirements for a minor in English 

Qr. Hrs. 

English 115-116-117 9 

English 261-262-263 9 

English 318 or 319 3 

English 352 or 353 3 

English 354 or 405 3 

English 115. Composition — The Mechanics o£ Written Dis- 
course. A study of the fundamental processes involved in correct speaking 
and writing. The following topics are among those stressed: the use of the 
dictionary and other reference books; vocabulary building; sentence struc- 
ture with emphasis on various ways of coordinating and subordinating 
thoughts; the forms and functions of the various parts of speech, as used 
in composition; capitalization and punctuation; collection and organization 
of material for themes. Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated 
second and third quarters. Three credits. 

English 116. Expository and Descriptive Writing. Prerequisite: 
English 115 or equivalent. Attention is given to the structure and function 
of the various kinds of paragraphs; to the structure and development of the 
various types of exposition; and to the various forms of descriptive writing 
including methods of developing each. Three periods a week for second 
quarter. Repeated third quarter. Three credits. 

English 117. Composition — Narration and Argumentation. Pre- 
requisites: English 115 and 116, or equivalent. Narration, argumentation, 
and letter writing are taught. Emphasis is placed upon the writing of the 
various types of informational and artistic narration. An intensive study 
is made of the forms and content of business and social letters. Offered 
each quarter. Three periods a week. Three credits. 



English 121 



English 216. Advanced English Grammar. This course in tech- 
nical and formal English grammar is intended to give the student a thorough 
knowledge of the grammatical structure of the English language. Mastery 
of the laws and principles of grammar underlying the correct use of the 
English language is required. Three periods a week for third quarter. 
Three credits. 

English 231. Modern Poetry. The growth and development of mod- 
ern British and American poetry according to chronological periods and 
types; characteristic aspects of contemporary life as depicted in the writings 
of representative poets. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three 
credits. 

English 241. Journalism. The courses in journalism are designed 
to equip the student with some knowledge of the elements of news writing 
and to serve as preparatory courses for those students who may wish to enter 
graduate schools of journalism. In English 241 newspaper organization, 
news sources, newspaper style, and the various types of news leads are con- 
sidered, and students are required to practice the writing of news stories. 
Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 242. Journalism. A continuation of English 241, this course 
includes the study of the various kinds of news stories, and treats briefly of 
libel, newspaper ethics, and policy in the news. Much practice in news 
writing is required, and contributions to the college newspaper are prepared. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

English 243. Journalism. A continuation of English 242, this course 
deals particularly with the special types of news stories, and some study 
is made of the society, sports, and editorial pages. Copyreading, proof- 
reading, headlining, and make-up are also considered. Three periods a 
week for third quarter. Three credits. 

English 261. Survey of English Literature. Prerequisites: English 
115-116-117 or equivalent. A thorough study is made of the history of Eng- 
lish literature from its beginnings to the Age of Johnson, with an intensive 
study of selections of the representative writers. Three periods a week 
for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 262. Survey of English Literature. Prerequisites English 

115-116-117-261 or equivalent. Continuation of survey from the Age of 

Johnson to the present time. Three periods a week for second quarter. 
Three credits. 

English 263. Survey of American Literature. Prerequisites: Eng- 
lish 115-116-117 or equivalent. A careful study is made of the great periods 
and movements in the development of American literature. Representative 
selections of the writers of American literature are read. Three periods 
a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

English 318. English Romantic Poetry. Prerequisites: English 115- 
116-117 and 261-262-263. In this course the Romantic movement in English 
literature is carefully traced as to its origin, development, various aspects, 
and phases of English life reflected: social, political, and religious. Three 
periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 319. Victorian Poetry. Prerequisites: English 115-116-117, 
and 261-262-263. This course provides intensive study of the major Vic- 
torian poets: Tennyson, Browning, Mrs. Browning, Arnold, Swinburne, 
Morris, and the Rosettis. Religious, social, and political changes disturbing 
the thought of nineteenth century English are studied. Three periods a week 
for second quarter. Three credits. 



124 Mary Washington College 

English 320. The Age of Pope. Prerequisites: English 115-116-117, 
and 261-262-263. A study is made of Dryden, Swift, Defoe, Gay Arbuthnot, 
Addison, Steele, and Pope, with especial emphasis upon the development 
of the periodical essay and of modern prose style. Three periods a week 
for third quarter. Three credits. 

English 324. Advanced Studies in American Literature. Pre- 
requisites: English 115-116-117, and 261-262-263. Major developments of 
the national cultural traditions are shown by the study of outstanding writers. 
The material for study will vary from year to year. Three periods a week 
for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 345. The Short Story. This course gives the student a rich 
background for the enjoyment of the short story. The first half gives a 
survey of the origin and development of the short story, with major em- 
phasis upon those American authors from Irving to O. Henry who have 
been influential in making it a distinct literary form. The second half pro- 
vides for extensive reading and intensive study of the contemporary short 
story. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 351. Shakespeare's Historical Plays. Prerequisites: Eng- 
lish 115-116-117, and 261-262-263. An intensive study of Shakespeare's 
dramatization of historical material. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Three credits. 

English 352. Shakespeare's Comedies. Prerequisites: English 115- 
116-117, 261-262. This course acquaints the student with eight or ten of the 
best comedies of Shakespeare. It also gives the student a comprehensive 
idea of the social background of Elizabethan England and of the history 
and development of the drama up to the time of Shakespeare. Three periods 
a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

English 353. Shakespeare's Tragedies. Prerequisites: English 115- 
116-117, 261-262. This course offers an intensive study of six or more of 
Shakespeare's best tragedies. Attention is given to the source material and 
to the stage history of the plays. Three periods a week for second quarter. 
Three credits. 

English 354. The History of the English Language. A study is 
made of the origin, growth, and structure of the English language; its spread 
over the world; the shaping influence upon it of Scandinavian, Norman- 
French, Latin, and Greek; the development of modern English from old 
English; modifications in sounds and in syntax; the development of the 
English vocabulary; and the relation of English to the other members of 
the Indo-European group of languages. Three periods a week for third 
quarter. Three credits. 

English 355. Biblical Literature. The origin and structure of the 
Old Testament and its universal influence upon literature, history, and the 
activities of peoples in all ages are discussed. This course also includes a 
detailed study of the nature of religion and a brief introduction to the 
characteristics of the great religions of the world. Three periods a week for 
second quarter. Three credits. 

English 356. Biblical Literature. The New Testament writings 
furnish the basic material for the work in this course. The background and 
historical setting of the various types of literature found in the New Testa- 
ment writings are discussed. The life, character, and teachings of Jesus 
Christ and the early history of the church are studied intensively. Three 
periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

/ 



English 125 



English 360. Southern Literature. Prerequisites: English 115-116- 
117, and 261-262-263. Special emphasis is placed upon the writings pro- 
duced by the Charleston and Richmond groups and upon the poetry of the 
South. Three »periods a week for third quarter. Offered alternate years. 
Three credits. 

English 370. Current Literature. This course is designed to enable 
students to know and to evaluate current literature. Trends in theme and 
style are examined in terms of various types of current literature. One 
period a week. Offered each quarter. One credit each quarter. Maximum 
credit, three hours. Fee, 50 cents. 

English 401. Biography. Prerequisites: English 115-116-117, and 
261-262-263. This course traces the historical development of biographical 
writings. Attention is given to the following forms of this type of litera- 
ture: biographies, autobiographies, letters, diaries, and journals. Each stu- 
dent is required to read at least twelve representative biographies and 
to write a term paper based on indpendent research illustrating the relative 
effectiveness of the traditional and the new methods in biographical writing. 
Offered alternate years. Three periods a week for second quarter. Three 
credits. 

English 402. The Nineteenth Century English Essay. Prerequi- 
sites: English 115-116-117, and 261-262-263. This course traces the essay as a 
literary form through the successive stages of its development, with special 
emphasis upon changes in form and in content. Offered alternate years. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

English 403. Literary Interpretation and Criticism. Prerequisites: 
English 115-116-117, and 261-262-263. A study is made of literary inter- 
pretation and criticism and its development. The application of the basic 
laws of literary criticism in the writings of prominent authors is discovered 
and discussed. Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

English 404. Chaucer. Prerequisites: English 115-116-117, and 261- 
262-263. A general study of the social and literary background of Chaucerian 
period, and a detailed study of his major works. Three periods a week for 
third quarter. Three credits. 

English 405. Readings in World Literature. Prerequisites: Eng- 
lish 115-116-117, 261-262. In this course a study is made of world master- 
pieces. Each student is required to read and make notes on six world 
masterpieces as her special problem. The assignments and class work deal 
with outstanding literary movements in the various countries and ages 
that produced these masterpieces. Three periods a week for second quarter. 
Three credits. 

English 407. The English Novel. Prerequisite: Nine hours of lit- 
erature. This course takes the novel in England from its beginnings in 
the eighteenth century down to the present. It includes a number of the 
outstanding novels throughout the period. Stress is laid upon the novel 
as a product of its social times, and upon its value as an interpretation of 
life. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 408. The American Novel. This course treats the novel in 
America from the same viewpoint as the English novel is treated in 407, 
but here less stress is placed upon the earlier novels and more upon the 
later ones. Special attention is given to those novels which may be re- 
garded as an interpretation of significant developments in American life. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 



126 Mary Washington College 

English 415. Advanced Composition. Prerequisites: English 115- 
116-117, 261-262-263. Principles and methods of effective writing are ap- 
plied. This course seeks to develop concise and fluent diction, clarity and 
accuracy in expression, and an individual and vigorous style. , Three periods 
a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

English 420. Journalism. This is a more advanced course in- 
tended primarily for seniors who have demonstrated their proficiency in 
English composition and who wish to learn to write for publication. The 
course consists in the study of feature articles and practice in their prepara- 
tion for newspapers and other periodicals. Three periods a week for first 
quarter. Three credits. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Professor Quenzel 
Instructors Whitenack, Lutz, *Fry, Dickinson 

The opening of E. Lee Trinkle Library has made possible 
an expansion of the facilities available for the training of librarians. 
This modern and complete equipped building offers opportunities 
for many types of experience in the various phases of library service. 

In addition to the development of specific library techniques, 
acquaintance with a wide variety of library materials may be had. 

The E. Lee Trinkle Library includes five main reading rooms 
devoted, respectively, to reserved books, reference books, periodicals, 
books for browsing, and the Virginia collection. Five floors of 
all-metal stacks house the general book collection. In addition to 
well-equipped offices and workrooms the Library contains classrooms 
for instruction in library science and the Mendel Museum. 

The complication of the following courses, totaling 27 quarter 
hours, is necessary for a minor in Library Science. While these 
courses are designed especially to meet the requirements for teacher- 
librarians, they are open to any students wishing to prepare for 
service in this interesting field. 

Library Science 381. Children's Literature. This course is de- 
signed to include a study of literature suitable for the elementary grades. 
The following subjects are covered: (1) historical survey of children's lit- 
erature; (2) reading interests of children at various ages; (3) types of 
children's literature; (4) illustrators of children's books ; (5) examination 
of book selection aids for children. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Three credits. 

Library Science 382. Adolescent Literature. This course attempts 
to develop a wide acquaintance with and evaluation of all types of literature 
suitable for adolescents; it includes a study of book selection aids for 
secondary school libraries. Emphasis is placed upon building a good book 
collection for secondary school libraries. Three periods a week for second 
quarter. Three credits. 



"Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Foreign Languages 127 



Library Science 383. Book Selection. Prerequisites: Library Sci- 
ence 381 and 382. Study of the development of criteria for the selection of 
books for libraries. This includes: (1) general principles of book selection 
and practice with book selection aids; (2) study of various types of litera- 
ture; (3) reading and reviewing of selected books; (4) writing book an- 
notations; (5) study of publishers and editions. Three periods a week for 
third quarter. Three credits. 

Library Science 391. Reference and Bibliography. Critical ex- 
amination and analysis of standard reference books, both general and speci- 
fic; the study of various bibliographical forms and the preparation of exten- 
sive bibliographies ; lectures and problems involving the use of the most im- 
portant reference books. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three 
credits. 

Library Science 392. Teaching the Use of Books and Library. 
Study of current practices of instruction in the use of the library in elemen- 
tary and secondary schools. Preparation, presentation, and discussion of 
lesson plans for various types of schools. Three periods a week for second 
quarter. Three credits. 

Library Science 393. School Library Administration. Current 
practices of school library administration, each as housing and equipping a 
school library; ordering and buying of books and supplies; binding and re- 
pairing of books; loan systems and records; personnel and management; 
technical and business practices. Three periods a week for third quarter. 
Three credits. 

Library Science 395. Cataloguing and Classification. Study of 
library classification, with special emphasis on the Dewey Decimal System, 
and the essential principles of library cataloguing; supervised practice in 
both classification and cataloguing, with stress on their uses and modifica- 
tions in small school libraries; preparation and filing of catalogue cards. 
Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Library Science 396. Advanced Cataloguing and Classification. 
Continuation of Library Science 395, which is a prerequisite to this course. 
Some skill in typing is also necessary. Extensive practice work is provided. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Library Science 397. Supervised Practice. Prerequisites: Library 
Science 391-392-395. Observation of techniques and supervised practice in 
the college library. This course is intended to provide practical application 
of knowledge and techniques acquired in other library science courses. Three 
periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Professors Brenner, Cabrera, Stansbury, Tanner 

Associate Professors Boiling, Mcintosh 

Assistant Professor Spaulding 

A knowledge of the contributions of the various nations to 
the civilization of the world and to that of our own country is 
indispensable in a world which is growing smaller year by year. 



128 Mary Washington College 

The civilization of any people can be most adequately appreciated 
only by one who has some acquaintance with the language of that 
people. There will be a greatly increased demand for those who 
are competent in foreign languages — both ancient and modern — in 
the post-war world. 

Clubs for the various languages afford the students opportuni- 
ties to enjoy activities which supplement the work of the classes and 
to meet each other in pleasant social gatherings. 

No credit is allowed for less than one full year of any for- 
eign language. 

Majors and Minors 

Requirements for a major in any one of the eight languages 
offered in the department are 36 quarter hours; for a minor 27 
quarter hours. The elementary courses listed as French B101-B-102- 
B103, Spanish B121-B122-B123, and Latin 11-12-13 are not counted 
toward fulfilling the requirements for a major or a minor, but they 
will be credited toward the general requirements for a degree. 

General 

Language 101-102-103. The origin and development of language and 
languages. The interrelationship of the languages and their contribution to 
English. The development of writing, books, and libraries. Three periods 
a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. Elective credit only; 
not accepted as part of the foreign language requirements for a degree. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

French 

French B101-B102-B103. The fundamentals of French grammar, 
phonetics, composition, conversation, and reading. A course for students 
who enter college with less than two units in high school French and wish 
to study the language for the cultural value or who plan to elect French 
as a major or minor. Five periods a week for session. Three credits each 
quarter. 

French 101-102-103. A brief review of grammar and practical pho- 
netics; oral and written composition with emphasis on vocabulary building; 
varied readings in the field of the short story and the one-act play, with 
additional readings according to the ability of the students. Prerequisite: 
two or three years of French in high school or French B101-B102-B103. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

French 201-202-203. Prerequisite: French 101-102-103. A study 
through French texts and regional novels of the country and people of 
France; the history of the French nation and its contribution to civilization; 
an introduction to French poetry and the reading of selections from con- 
temporary French poets. Three periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 



Foreign Languages 129 



French 301-302-303. Prerequisite: French 201-202-203. A survey 
of French literature, with lectures, reports and illustrative readings from 
the most representative writers of selected periods. Three periods a week 
for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

French 401-402-403. This course includes an intensive study of 
Classicism, with emphasis on the theaters of Moliere, Corneille, and Racine; 
the Romantic Movement, stressing the works of Victor Hugo; and Contem- 
porary Literature as represented in the novel, the drama, and poetry. Three 
periods a week for session. Three credits each quarter. 

French 405-406-407. A course in advanced composition, conversation 
and phonetics, designed for those students who wish credit above the re- 
quired number of hours. Open to juniors and seniors upon recommenda- 
tion of the major professor. Three periods a week for session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Spanish 

Spanish B121-B122-B123. The fundamentals of grammar, pronun- 
ciation, conversation, dictation, reading, correspondence, cultural material. 
A course for those students who enter college with no credits in Spanish. 
No credit unless entire year is completed. Five periods a week for the 
session. Three credits each quarter. 

Spanish 121-122-123. A course in conversation and composition based 
on works read; review of grammatical principles; Spanish and South 
American life and customs. Prerequisite: Two years of high school Span- 
ish or B121-B122-B123. Three periods a week for the session. Three credits 
each quarter. 

Spanish 221-222-223. A survey of Spanish-American literature with 
emphasis on the Modernista movement; the short story; the lyric poetry 
of the nineteenth century. Three periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Spanish 321-322-323. A survey of the great periods in Spanish litera- 
ture with reading of representative works in the theater, novel, and poetry. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Spanish 421-422-423. An intensive course based on present day litera- 
ture of South America; considerable time will be devoted the theater and 
the novel of the past hundred years. Three periods a week for the session. 
Three credits each quarter. 

Portuguese 

Portuguese 141-142-143. The rudiments of grammar and pronuncia- 
tion; reading and conversation based on short essays and general cultural 
material. Five periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Portuguese 241-242-243. A brief review of grammar; reading Portu- 
guese newspapers and short stories to build vocabulary and increase con- 
versational ability; reading and discussion of modern Brazilian literature. 
Prerequisite: Portuguese 141-142-143. Three periods a week for the session. 
Three credits each quarter. 

Portuguese 341-342-343. A study of Portuguese literature with con- 
siderable time devoted to lyric poetry. Three periods a week for the session. 
Three credits each quarter. 



130 Mary Washington College 

Portuguese 441-442-443. An advanced course on the literature and 
life of Brazil ; reading and reports in Portuguese on present day topics. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Russian 

Russian 171-172-173. Elementary Russian. A course intended to 
familiarize the student with the common vocabulary and fundamental gram- 
matical structure of the language; practice in conversation and reading of 
easy Russian texts. Five periods a week for the session. Three credits 
each quarter. 

Russian 271-272-273. Intermediate Russian. A thorough review of 
grammar; reading selected texts from modern prose writers; conversation 
on topics of current interest. Three periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Russian 371-372-373. Introduction to Russian Literature. Read- 
ings from novelists and dramatists of the nineteenth century: Pushkin, 
Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, and Tolstoy; life and culture of the times. Three 
periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Russian 471-472-473. Recent Russian Literature. Readings from 
important Russian writers of the twentieth century: Chekhov, Gorky, and 
others; a study of the country and people as reflected in the literature. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Italian 

Italian 161-162-163. The fundamentals of grammar and pronuncia- 
tion; reading and conversation based on works chosen to give a cultural 
background. Five periods a week for the session. Three credits each 
quarter. 

Italian 261-262-263. A review of grammatical principles; reading of 
selected texts; collateral reading for comprehension and enjoyment. Three 
periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Italian 361-362-363. Readings from Italian literature with emphasis 
on the novel and theater of the nineteenth century. Three periods a week 
for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Italian 461-462-463. A study of classical Italian literature with em- 
phasis on the words of Dante and the lyric poets of the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries. Three periods a week for the session. Three credits 
each quarter. 

German 

German 151-152-153. Fundamentals of grammar; composition, con- 
versation, and reading. Five periods a week for the session. Three credits 
each quarter. 

German 251-252-253. Intermediate grammar review and conversa- 
tion; reading of modern German texts. Three periods a week for the 
session. Three credits each quarter. 

German 351-352-353. An intensive study of German Classicism in 
the works of Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller. Three periods a week for 
the session. Three credits each quarter. 



Foreign Languages 131 



German 451-452-453. Lectures, reading and reports on German litera- 
ture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Three periods a week for 
the session. Three credits each quarter. 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 
Greek 

Greek 131-132-133. Elementary Greek. The elements of the Greek 
language; translation from selected authors; a study of Greek civilization 
and the influence of Greek culture on the modern world. No credit unless 
entire year is completed. Five periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Greek 231-232-233. Xenephone, Herodotus, Homer. A reading of 
selections from Xenephon and Herodotus. Selections from the Iliad and 
the Odyssey; a study of Homeric civilization, of the literary qualities of 
the poems, and of their influence on subsequent literature. Three periods 
a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Greek 331-332-333. Attic Prose and Poetry. A study of selections 
from Plato, Demosthenes, Thucydides; the elegiac, iambic, and lyric poets. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Greek 431-432-433. The Greek Theater and Drama. A study of 
the origin and development of the drama ; readings from Sophocles, Aeschy- 
lus, Euripides, and Aristophanes. Three periods a week for the session. 
Three credits each quarter. 

Latin 

Latin 11-12-13. A course for students who enter college with less 
than two high-school units in Latin. The essentials of Latin grammar and 
composition; translation of selection from Caesar and other prose authors. 
Five periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter upon 
completion of Latin 111-112-113. 

Latin 111-112-113. A course for students who enter college with two 
or three units in high-school Latin. Readings from Cicero's Orations; 
Vergil's Aeneid, Books I-VI; continuation of grammar and composition; so- 
cial and political institutions and mythology of Rome. Three periods a 
week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Latin 211-212-213. A course for students who enter college with four 
units in high-school Latin or who have completed Latin 111-112-113. Se- 
lections from Livy, Tacitus, and other historians; Horace's Odes and 
Epodes; study of Roman art and literature and it's influence on later ages. 
Advanced composition is included in the course. Three periods a week 
for the session. Three credits each quarter. 

Latin 311-312-313. Prerequisite: Latin 211-212-213. An advanced 
course in which attention is given to Roman elegiac poetry; Catullus, Tibul- 
lus, Propertius, and Ovid, Roman comedy and tragedy, with selections from 
the plays of Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. Study of classical drama, its 
technique and development. Three periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Latin 411-412-413. Roman satire as it developed in fable, epigram, 
and poetry. Readings from Phaedrus, Juvenal, Martial, and Horace; 
Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, and selections from other philosophical works. 
Three periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 



132 Mary Washington College 

Latin 415-416-417. A course in classical art and archaelogy and the 
topography and monuments of ancient Rome. The course is designed for 
students who wish credit above the required number of hours. Open to 
juniors and seniors upon recommendation of the major professor. Three 
periods a week for the session. Three credits each quarter. 



HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Professors Darter, Lindsey, Haensel, Hilldrup, J. H. Dodd 

Associate Professor Mooney 

Assistant Professors Bauer, *Hemphill, Bowers, Whitticar 

Instructor Caverlee 



The increasing complexity of modern life and the pressing 
economic, political, social, racial, religious, and cultural problems 
resulting therefrom have brought a new emphasis upon the social 
sciences in education. 

One of the most pronounced trends in contemporary life is the 
attempt to socialize education. In keeping with this new social point 
of view, history, political science, economics, sociology, geography, 
and other social studies have come to occupy a central place in the 
curricula of public schools, colleges and universities. 

A second significant trend in education is the concept of the 
unity of human experience, which has resulted in the attempt to 
integrate or fuse all the elements involved in the learning process, 
thus opposing the old emphasis on the delimitation and depart- 
mentalization of human knowledge. Instruction in the History and 
Social Science Department recognizes this principle and is largely 
characterized by such procedure as prevails among adherents of 
this theory of teaching. 

To fulfill the responsibility of a public institution conscious 
of the new social trends, the Department of History and Social 
Science seeks to expand and enrich its offerings and set up such 
courses for the general student and for majors and minors in these 
fields as will best fit them to understand and perform intelligently 
the social responsibilities which devolve upon them. 



♦Absent on leave, 1944-45. 



History and Social Science 133 

Requirements for a major in History 

Qr. Hrs. 

History 151-152-153 9 

History 261-262-263 9 

History 311-312-313 9 

One junior or senior course in History 9 

Requirements for a minor in History 

Qr. Hrs. 

History 151-152-153 9 

History 261-262-263 9 

One junior or senior course in History 9 

Requirements for a major in Social Science 

Qr. Hrs. 

History 151-152-153 9 

History 261-262-263 8 9 

Social Science 411-412-413, or 

Social Science 401-402-403 9 

One junior or senior course in Political Science 9 



Requirements for a minor in Social Science 

Qr.Hrs. 

History 261-262-263 9 

Social Science 411-412-413, or 

Social Science 401-402-403 9 

One junior or senior course in Political Science 9 

History 

History 151. American History. Colonial Period. A survey of the 
European background, the colonial period, the American Revolution, "the 
critical period," and the formation of the Constitution. Three periods a 
week for first quarter. Three credits. 

History 152. American History. Middle Period, 1789-1865. A study 
of the growth of the United States from the Federalist administration 
through the Jeffersonian period, the Jacksonian era, westward expansion, 
the slavery crisis, and the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on the develop- 
ment of democracy, the growth of nationalism, and the economic and social 
factors that shaped the course of the nation during the formative period. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 



134 Mary Washington College 

History 153. American History. Recent Period, since 1865. This 
course deals with the leading events and forces involved in the recent 
domestic politics and foreign relations of the United States, with special 
attention to the effect of economic and social changes. Financial questions, 
reforms, relations of government and business, expansion overseas, United 
States as a world power and her participation in the World War, and world 
politics are treated. Three periods a week for the third quarter. Three 
credits. 

History 221. History of Religions. The history, development, and 
influence of the religions of mankind are studied chronologically and racial- 
ly, with particular attention to the peculiar characteristics of the races as 
revealed in the religious life. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three 
credits. 

History 261. History of Civilization. A study of the bases of 
civilization from the astronomical, geological, biological, and geographical 
points of view ; the origin and dispersion of races ; earliest cultures found 
in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, etc Three periods a week for first 
quarter. Three credits. 

History 262. History of Civilization. A general survey of world 
progress from tne beginnings of ancient civilizations to about 1500 A.D. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

History 263. History of Civilization. From 1500 to the present. 
Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

History 307. Europe in the Middle Ages. A survey of medieval 
civilization from the decline of the Roman Empire to the beginning of the 
modern era, with special emphasis on the economic, political, religious, 
and social institutions of the period. Particular attention is devoted to 
such topics as feudalism; the church; the emergence of national states; 
medieval thought, art, and literature; the development of commerce; the 
rise of towns. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

History 308. Trie Renaissance. A more intensive study of the later 
Middle Ages and early modern era, with special emphasis on the cultural 
achievements of the period in the fields of art, literature, and science. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

History 309. The Reformation. A survey and analysis of the re- 
ligious movements of the early modern era from the Protestant Reforma- 
tion to the Peace of Westphalia. Special attention is paid to social, eco- 
nomic, and cultural developments of the period. Three periods a week 
for third quarter. Three credits. 

History 311. Mbdern History. Prerequisites: History 261-262-263 
or equivalent. A survey of modern history from 1815 to 1870. Beginning 
with the social, economic, and political background of the period, the 
progress of social legislation and the growth of modern states and na- 
tionalism are traced to about 1870. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Three credits. 

History 312. Modern History. From 1870 to 1914. A continuation 
of History 311 with emphasis on nationalism, imperialism, and international 
relations as background of the World War. Three periods a week for 
second quarter. Three credits. 

History 313. Modern History. From 1914 to the present. A study 
of the World War and the problems growing out of it; the new map of 
Europe; the League of Nations, and other efforts of international coopera- 
tion. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 



History and Social Science 135 



History 341. Latin America. The course deals with European back- 
ground of Spanish and Portuguese America, the conquest, native civiliza- 
tions, and the institutions and life of the colonial period. Three periods a 
week for first quarter. Three credits. 

History 342. Latin America. A survey of political, social, and eco- 
nomic developments in Latin America during the nineteenth century. Three 
periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

History 343. Latin America. Emphasis will be placed upon present- 
day conditions, international relations, and such topics as the Monroe Doc- 
trine, Pan-Americanism, and the Good Neighbor Policy. Three periods a 
week for third quarter. Three credits. 

History 351. History of Virginia. A study of the development of 
the Commonwealth from the settlement of Jamestown to the present, with 
emphasis upon the relation of Virginia to the sectional history of the South 
and to the national history of the United States. Classroom instruction and 
library readings will be supplemented as much as possible by field trips 
to nearby historic shrines. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three 
credits. 

History 352. The Old South. A study of ante bellum South, with 
some attention given to its colonial background and with emphasis placed 
upon its political, economic, and social development in relation to the nation 
as a whole. Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

History 353. The New South. A study of the post bellum South, 
tracing its political and economic evolution from the beginning of the Re- 
construction period until the present and noting its place in the course of 
national affairs. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

History 380. Current History. A study of current national and in- 
ternational problems. Offered each quarter. One period a week. One credit 
each quarter. Maximum credit, three hours. Fee, 50 cents. 

History 404. English History to 1558. A general survey of 
English History from earliest records through the early Tudors. Three 
periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

History 405. English History, 1558-1783. The political, social and 
economic development from the accession of Queen Elizabeth to the failure 
of the personal rule of George III. Three periods a week for second quar- 
ter. Three credits. 

History 406. English History. The period of the British Empire. 
Greater attention is given to the fashioning and maintaining of the Empire 
during this period. The internal history of the United Kingdom, how- 
ever, is not wholly neglected. Three periods a week for third quarter. 
Three credits. 

History 480. Experimental Study in World Affairs. This course 
is conducted on a seminar basis. Outstanding men and women from various 
walks of life are brought to the college throughout the quarter to present 
to the class some subject of national or international importance. Reading 
assignments^ preparatory to discussion of each subject are required of the 
students. Field trips^ are made to leading educational, business, and political 
institutions or establishments, including the State Department, Congress, the 
Supreme^ Court, Pan-American Union, and Embassies. Open only to seniors 
with major or minor in history or social science. Three periods a week for 
first' quarter. Three credits. 



136 Mary Washington College 

Political Science 

Social Science 321. Federal Constitution. This course aims to give 
the student a better understanding of the federal constitution. Among the 
topics treated are: the Constitutional Convention and the framing of the Con- 
stitution; origin of American constitutional theories; the national legislature; 
the executive; the federal judiciary; constitutional problems and contro- 
versies typical of the development of American issues and institutions. Three 
periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 322. Political Parties. A study of the origin, de- 
velopment, organization, and functions of the political parties in the United 
States. Special attention is devoted to such topics as nominating systems, 
elections, party machinery, political bosses, patronage, and the financing of 
parties. Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 323. Municipal Government. A study of the or- 
ganization and functions of municipal governments in the United States. 
Particular emphasis will be placed on the activities of city administration 
and their relations to modern social and economic problems. Three periods 
a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 365. International Economic Problems and Post- 
War Reconstruction. A survey of modern economic problems chiefly on 
the basis of political and social conditions of France, England, Germany, 
Italy, and Russia since World War I ; economic problems created by Amer- 
ican participation in the World War II and economics of post-war recon- 
struction in Europe and America. Three periods a week for second quarter. 
Repeated third quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 371. Political, Economic, Social and Cultural In- 
stitutions of Russia. A survey of Russian conditions under the Tsarist 
regime, the Revolution and particularly under the Soviet rule. Soviet con- 
stitution, general economic planning, agriculture, industry, trade, education, 
religion, literature, theatre and press and the Soviet .Union in the World 
War. Three periods a ^week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. 
Three credits. 

Social Science 414. State Government. This course is devoted to 
the study of State governments and administration. Three periods a week 
for first quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 415. Comparative Government. Prerequisites: Two 
years of History and Social Science. A study of the principles and forms 
of governments in general ; descriptive and analytical study of the American 
Government, and a survey of the major governments of Europe. Some of 
the most important problems of modern government receive attention, such 
as nationalism, national defense, regulation of economic and social activities 
by government; American international policies, with special reference to 
Pan-American relationships, World Court, League of Nations, etc. Three 
periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 416. International Relations. Prerequisite^ Two 
years of History and Social Science. A study of the political, economic, and 
racial factors in modern international society, international law, the League 
of Nations, the World Court, the Hague Court of Arbitration, Pact of 
Paris, Geneva Protocol, Locarno Pact, etc. Three periods a week for third 
quarter. Three credits. 



History and Social Science 137 



Geography 

Social Science 115. World Geography. A survey of the geography 
of Europe, Asia, North and South America, Africa, and Australia, with 
reference to topography, climate, industries, and people of each. Three 
periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 215. Geography of North America. This course 
is planned to give a regional treatment of the human geography of North 
America. Particular attention is given to contrasts in economic develop- 
ment and the resulting social and political differences. Three periods a 
week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 216. Geography of Eurasia. The course deals with 
the natural geographic regions of Europe and Asia in relation to life and 
human activities. The political geography of nations, and Asiatic par- 
ticipation in world affairs also receive treatment. Three periods a week 
for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 217 or 317. Geography of South America. A geo- 
graphic interpretation of the economic and commercial activities of man in 
the major regions of South America. Special attention is given to some of 
the current economic and geographic problems of importance to both the 
United States and Latin America. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Repeated the second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 256. Economic Geography. In this course a study 
is made of the geographic factors which influence the production, distribu- 
tion, and utilization of the most important products of the United States. 
Natural resources, climate, and the influence of natural trade routes are 
considered. Three periods a week. Offered each quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 315. Conservation of Natural Resources. This 
course deals with our natural resources and their conservation. The need of 
conservation in relation to our soil, minerals, forests, and wild life is stressed. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Economics 

Social Science 301. Economic History of Europe. A survey of 
the course of economic developments in Europe from the Commercial Revo- 
lution to the present. Emphasis is mainly upon European economic history 
as the background of American development. Three periods a week for 
first quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 302. Economic History of the United States. This 
course includes the colonial and middle periods. Effort is made to develop 
a thorough understanding of the beginnings in these two periods to serve 
as a foundation for interpreting post-Civil War developments. Three periods 
a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 303. Economic History of the United States. The 
major emphasis is upon understanding the nature and the consequences of 
the rise of industrial capitalism in this period of American economic maturity. 
Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 361. Public Finance and Taxation. A study of gov- 
ernment expenditures and revenues in a modern state with particular em- 
phasis on the policy of the Federal government in raising revenue, contracting 
public debt, and financing the war; also discussion of post-war problems of 
public finance. Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated each 
quarter. Three credits. 



138 Mary Washington College 

Social Science 362. Public Budgets. A study of public finance 
planning, principles of public budgeting; demonstration of the British and 
some European national budgets; treasury accounting; public control and 
audit; Federal budgets and American state budgets. Three periods a week 
for first quarter. Repeated third quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 363. State and Local Public Finance and Taxa- 
tion. A study of revenues and expenditures of State and local governments ; 
relations with Federal public finance; reform problems of state and local 
finance with particular emphasis on problems facing the state of Virginia. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 401. Principles of Economics. The course sets 
forth the nature and importance of economic factors and forces in the life of 
the individual and in society. Consideration is given to the growth of eco- 
nomic institutions, to production, business organization, marketing, and 
price determination. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science .402. Principles of Economics. This is a study of 
money and credit, banking, foreign trade and exchange, international trade 
restrictions, business cycles, and the distribution of the national income. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 403. Principles of Economics. Consideration is 
given in this course to the problems of industrial relations, including the de- 
velopment of labor organization, the principles of collective bargaining, social 
legislation, agricultural problems, economics of public utilities and of trans- 
portation, governmental revenues and expenditures, and governmental con- 
trol. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 



Sociology 

Social Science 411. Introductory Sociology. The study of the 
principles of sociology, cultural and social origins ; how human society came 
to be what it is today. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three 
credits. 

Social Science 412. Applied Sociology. The principles studied in 
Introductory Sociology are applied to current social problems. ^ Each stu- 
dent will choose a specific problem for investigation. Three periods a week 
for second quarter. Three credits. 

Social Science 413. Social Problems. A study of the major social 
problems confronting American society. Special consideration is given to 
the cultural background and inter-relationships of these problems, their 
social implications, and a review of the various governmental and private 
methods of dealing with them. Three periods a week for third quarter. 
Three credits. 

Social Science 423. The Family. This course is concerned with the 
development of the family as a social institution and the factors in con- 
temporary problems of the family. The topics treated include: courtship; 
marriage ; what is right with marriage ; various views of marriage ; mother- 
hood; modern ways with babies; personality and the family; family and 
the church; the married woman; wholesome marriage; parents and chil- 
dren, etc. Three periods a week. Offered each quarter. Three credits. 



Mathematics 139 

MATHEMATICS 

Professors Carter, *Frick, Blincoe 
Instructors Gaither, *Whitney 

Mathematics rightly occupies an important place in the college 
curriculum, especially in a day characterized by continuous progress 
in scientific inventions and discoveries. The courses in Mathematics 
are planned to give an accurate knowledge of mathematical facts 
as well as to strengthen weak points in mathematical training. 

Requirements for a major in Mathematics 

Qr. Hrs. 

Mathematics 111-112-113 9 

Mathematics 211-212-213 9 

Mathematics 311-312-313 9 

Mathematics 411-412-413 9 

Requirements for a minor in Mathematics 

Qr. Hrs. 

Mathematics 111-112-113 9 

Mathematics 211-212-213 9 

Mathematics 311-312-313 9 



Mathematics 111-112-113. Trigonometry and Algebra. The topics 
of College Algebra and Trigonometry with a study of empirical equations. 
Three or five periods a week for session as advised by instructor. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Mathematics 121-122. Business Mathematics. The mathematics 
essential for work in commercial fields. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each quarter. 

Mathematics 211-212-213. Analytic Geometry. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 113. The first two quarters deal with analytic geometry of the 
plane and the third quarter is devoted to the analytic geometry of space. 
Three periods a week for session. Three credits each quarter. 

Mathematics 251. Mathematics of Investment. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 111-112-113. The mathematical theory of interest, annuities, and 
life insurance, together with practical applications. Three periods a week 
for first quarter. Three credits. 

Mathematics 311-312-313. Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
211-212-213. The topics of differential and integral calculus. Three periods 
a week for session. Three credits each quarter. 



♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



140 Mary Washington College 

Mathematics 361-362-363. Statistics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
111-112-113. Collecting and presenting data. Measures of central tendency, 
dispersion, skewness and kurtosis. Various types of curves and methods 
of curve fitting. Reliability. Sampling. Analysis of time series. Index 
numbers. Simple, partial and multiple correlation both linear and non- 
linear. Special problems in major field of student. Three periods a week 
for session. Three credits each quarter. 

Mathematics 411-412. Advanced Calculus. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 311-312-313. Selected topics in advanced differential and intergral 
calculus. Three periods a week for first and second quarters. Three credits 
each quarter. 

Mathematics 413. Advanced Algebra. Determinants matrices, 
linear dependence, transformations, invariants, bilinear forms and quadratic 
forms. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 



MUSIC 

Associate Professors Eppes, Faulkner 

Assistant Professors Chauncey, Reichenbach, Wysor 

Instructors Houston, Meyer, Ross, Klein, *Brennand, *Cousins, 

*Gasser, Hamer, Lundgren, Tomasow 

The Department of Music offers curricula leading to: 

1. The Bachelor of Music degree with a major in Applied 
Music (Piano, Voice, Violin, Violoncello, Organ, or other 
instruments). 

2. The Bachelor of Music degree, with a major in School 
Music (general or instrumental). 

3. The Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Applied 
Music (Piano, Voice, Violin, Violoncello, Organ, or other 
instruments) . 

4. The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in School 
Music (general or instrumental). 

Curricula leading to the Bachelor of Music degree are out- 
lined on page % (Cur. VII-A and VII-B). 

Requirements for admission to courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Music are as follows: 

1. Certification of graduation from an accredited high school 
or its equivalent, implying at least fifteen units which must 
include three units in English, two in foreign languages, 
one in mathematics, one in science or history, and eight 
in elective subjects. Any deficiency must be made up in 
the first year in college. 



♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



Music 141 

2. Musical preparation must include a knowledge of elemen- 
tary theory (notation, keys, and scale construction), and 
in Applied Music the following: 

a. Piano. The student should have proficiency in technique and tone 
production, and the ability to play all major and minor scales at a mod- 
erately fast tempo and arpeggios in octave position in all keys, and should 
have studied standard etudes and moderately difficult compositions. 

b. Voice. The student should be able to sing with correct intonation, 
phrasing, and interpretation standard songs in English and should demon- 
strate the ability to read simple songs at sight. A knowledge of piano 
is necessary. 

c. Organ. The student should have completed sufficient piano study 
to have the ability to play Bach inventions, Mozart sonatas, easier Beethoven 
sonatas, and compositions by Mendelssohn, Grieg, Schubert, Schumann, 
and others. 

d. Violin. The student should be able to play etudes such as the 
Kreutzer Etudes (1 to 32), such works as the Viotti Concerto, No. 23, the 
de Beriot concerti (7 and 9), and the Tartini G minor sonata. An elemen- 
tary knowledge of the piano is necessary. 

e. Orchestral Instruments. The student should have acquired ele- 
mentary technique on the chosen instrument and should have an elementary 
knowledge of the piano. 

A committee of faculty members will decide upon each student's 
qualifications for entrance into a curriculum leading to the Bachelor 
of Music degree. 

In addition to the Bachelor of Music degree, the Department 
of Music also offers curricula leading to the Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree with a major in Applied Music and the Bachelor of Science 
degree with a major in School Music. 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a Major 
in Applied Music: 

Qr. Hrs. 

Music 181-182-183 3 

Music 191-192-193 9 

Music 281-282-283 3 

Music 291-292-293 9 

Music 401-402-403 6 

Applied Music (Individual lessons in Piano, Voice, 

Violin, etc.) 24 

Music Electives 6 



142 Mary Washington College 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree with a 
Major in School Music: 

Qr.Hrs. 

Music 111-112-113 . 3 

Music 181-182-183 3 

Music 191-1^2-193 9 

Music 281-282-283 3 

Music 291-292-293 9 

Music 301-302-303 9 

Music 311-312-313 or , 3 

Music 374-375-376 3 

Music 321-322-323 3 

Music 401-402-403 6 

Philosophy 411-412-413 9 

Education 440 9 

Band or Orchestra 3 

Choral Group 1J^ 

Applied Music 12 

Requirements for admission to curricula leading to majors in 
Music with the B.A. or B.S. degree are the same as the general 
admission requirements of the college. 

The Department of Music also offers a minor in Applied 
Music for students working toward the Bachelor of Arts degree and 
a minor in School Music for students working toward the Bachelor 
of Science degree. A total of 27 quarter hours in Music is required 
for a minor. Minors in Music should be planned in consultation 
with the Head of the Department. 

Students in fields other than Music are admitted to choral 
organizations and orchestras according to their qualifications, and 
it is possible for them to acquire more credit in orchestra and band 
than listed for music majors. 

In George Washington Hall complete radio broadcasting facil- 
ities and electric recording equipment are available for use in the 
Music Department. Description of these facilities will be found 
under the heading of the Department of Dramatic Arts and Speech. 

In addition to the opportunities afforded students to hear the 
finest music in the College Lyceum Series, other opportunities are 
available nearby. In Washington and in Richmond, each only 
about fifty miles from Fredericksburg, can be heard operas and 



Music 143 

concerts by the finest artists and companies. Usually reduced rates 
in price of admission as well as in transportation costs can be ar- 
ranged. 

Theoretical and Educational Courses in Music 

Music 111-112-113. Survey of Music. A general survey of musical 
literature will be given. The course aims to give fundamental principles 
of intelligent listening, and to build up a repertory of music which should 
be the possession of every cultured person. Three periods a week for the 
session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Music 121. Singing. This course is for majors and minors in the 
Department of Physical and Health Education. The objective is the develop- 
ment of an effective singing voice for teaching singing-games and sufficient 
knowledge of the fundamentals of music to enable the prospective teacher 
of singing-games to master such song material. Two periods a week for 
first quarter. Two credits. 

Music 122-123. Class Piano. Class lessons in piano. Required of 
Physical Education majors and minors. Two periods a week for second 
and third quarters. Two credits a quarter. Fee, $3.00 a quarter. 

Music 161-162-163. Band. Qualified players of band instruments are 
admitted for marching and concert work. Uniforms are furnished free of 
charge. This course may be substituted for Music 171-172-173 in the require- 
ments for majors in Music. Five periods a week for the session. One 
credit each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter for use of college-owned 
instruments. 

Music 171-172-173. Orchestra. Participation in the performance 
symphonic and standard music. Qualified players are admitted to member- 
ship. A number of instruments are furnished. Five periods a week for 
the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter for use of col- 
lege-owned instruments. 

Music 181-182-183. Sight Singing. Scale and interval singing, 
rhythm, notation, and part-singing. Two periods a week for the session. 
One credit each quarter. 

Music 191-192-193. Harmony. Intensive study of music funda- 
mentals, scales, intervals, triads and their inversions. Harmonization of 
melodies; simple modulations, dominant seventh cords and their inversions 
and resolutions; diminished seventh chords, secondary seventh chords, domi- 
nant ninth chords, ornamental figures, dissonances. Assigned melodies, 
basses, and original work. Three periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Music 271-272-273. Orchestra. A continuation of Music 171-172-173. 
Five periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $3.00 
each quarter for use of college-owned instruments. 

Music 281-282-283. Ear Training. Intensive study of intervals, 
rhythm, melodic and two-, three-, and four-part dictation. Recognition of 
harmonic materials, modulations, and themes from instrumental forms. Two 
periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. 



144 Mary Washington College 

Music 291-292-293. Harmony. (Including Keyboard Harmony.) 
Continuation of first year harmony with stress on original work in four 
parts. Chromatic alterations, augmented sixth chords, extensive modulation, 
an approach to counterpoint, hymn and short choral settings, and piano ac- 
complishments. Keyboard harmonization, modulation, and transposition. 
Assigned and original work. Three periods a week for the session. Three 
credits each quarter. 

Music 301. School Music. This course includes the essentials of 
school music problems and materials for grades one through six; song sing- 
ing; appreciation; rhythmic and instrumental music; and how music may 
be vitalized by coordinating it with other school subjects, especially with 
art, geography, and history. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three 
credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Music 302. School Music. This course includes the essentials of 
school music problems and materials for grades seven and eight. A thorough 
study is made of the changing voice during adolescence and it's problems. 
Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

Music 303. School Music. This course includes the study of prob- 
lems and materials for the ninth, tenth, and eleventh grades. Courses of 
study are worked out for courses in Appreciation, History of Music, Har- 
mony, Choral Music, and materials for Glee Clubs, Band and Orchestral 
work. Three periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. Fee, $1.00. 

\ Music 311-312-313. Survey of Materials. A course designed to 
familiarize the student with School Music materials of all knds. One 
period a week for the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each 
quarter. 

Music 321-322-323. Conducting. Principles of conducting, tech- 
nique of the baton, study of materials and programs. Regular individual 
practice in organizing and conducting choral and orchestral groups. One 
period a week for the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each 
quarter. 

Music 361-362-383. Band. A continuation of the preceding course. 
Five periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $3.00 
each quarter for use of college-owned instruments. 

Music 371-372-373. Orchestra. A continuation of the preceding 
course ; more advanced work in ensemble and orchestral routine. Five 
periods a week. Offered each quarter. One credit. Fee, $3.00 each quar- 
ter for use of college-owned instruments. 

Music 374-375-376. Orchestral Instruments. Class study in im- 
portant instruments of the band and orchestra. Each student is given the 
opportunity to gain a practical knowledge of several instruments before 
graduation. Required of all School Music Majors. Two periods a week 
for the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter for use 
of instruments. 

Music 381-382-383. Ear Training. A continuation of Music 281- 
282-283. Two periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. 

Music 384-385-386. Diction in Singing. Study of the phoneticsof 
diction for singing in English and in foreign languages. Required elective 
for majors in Voice. Two periods a week for the session. Two credits each 
quarter. 



Music 145 



Music 391. Counterpoint. Creative writing in polyphonic style. 
Stress is laid on arrangements as they pertain to usages in schools, choirs, 
and orchestras. Opportunities for listening to students' compositions and 
arrangements will be provided. Three periods a week for the first quarter. 
Three credits. 

Music 392-393. Form and Analysis. Analytical study of small and 
large forms of composition. Three periods a week for the second and 
third quarters. Three credits each quarter. 

Music 401-402-403. History of Music. Study of the evolution of 
music in relation to world history from ancient times through contemporary 
developments. Two periods a week for the session. Two credits each 
quarter. Fee, $1.00 each quarter. 

Music 411-412-413. Composition. Creative work for piano, voice, 
orchestral instruments, and choral and orchestral forms. Two periods a 
week for the session. Two credits each quarter. 

Music 421-422-423. Music of the Church. Study of materials for 
large and small choirs, liturgical and less formal services, organ music, 
and choir organization and direction. Two periods a week for the ses- 
sion. Two credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Music 471-472-473. Orchestra. A continuation of Music 371-372-373. 
Five periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. Fee, $3.00 
each quarter for use of college-owned instruments. 

Music 474-475-476. Orchestration. Detailed study of building and 
performing orchestral scores. Two periods a week for the session. Two 
credits each quarter. Fee, $2.00 each quarter. 

Vocal Ensemble. Required of all students taking Voice for credit. 
Opportunities are given for solo and ensemble performances, with instruc- 
tion in stage deportment. No credit. 

Instrumental Ensemble. Required of all students taking Piano, Or- 
gan, and Orchestral Instruments for credit. Opportunities are given for solo 
and ensemble performances, with instruction in stage deportment. 

A Cappella Choir. An organization devoted to the performance of 
unaccompanied choral works, ancient, medieval, and modern. Two periods 
a week for the session. One and a half credits for the session. Credit will 
not be allowed for less than one year. 

College Gee Club. The Glee Club is made up of sixty members chosen 
by the director from those who apply for membership. The Glee Club ap- 
pears on many programs during the college year and during Commencement. 
It also appears on programs in nearby towns. Talented members are given 
special training as soloists. The club meets one evening every week for a 
two hour period, and studies the best choral music. One and a half credits 
for the session. Credit will not be allowed for less than one year. 

Chorus. Requirements for membership: a good natural voice, correct 
intonation, and some knowledge of music notation. Membership unlimited. 
One and a half credits for the session. Credit will not be allowed for less 
than one year. Two periods a week for the session. 



146 Mary Washington College 

APPLIED MUSIC COURSES 

Individual lessons in voice, piano, organ, violin, viola, violon- 
cello, contrabass, harp, flute, clarinet, and other instruments are of- 
fered by specialists in these fields. The work is outlined according 
to the ability of the student. For this reason detailed descriptions 
of each course are omitted. 

For regular courses in applied music offered by resident mem- 
bers of the faculty the charge is $18.00 for individual instruction, one 
lesson a week for one quarter, plus a $3.00 practice fee. These 
courses carry one to three credits each per quarter in freshman and 
sophomore classes, and one to five credits each per quarter in junior 
and senior classes, with relative adjustments in fees according to 
the amount of credit received. 

Special courses in applied music conducted by outstanding 
visiting teachers are also available to more advanced students at a 
slightly higher cost. Mr. Millard Taylor, Concert Master of the 
National Symphony Orchestra of Washington, offers instruction in 
stringed instruments; Miss Sylvia Meyer, Solo Harpist of the Na- 
tional Symphony, teaches harp; Miss Helen Marie Lundgren, of 
the National Symphony Orchestra, offers instruction in trumpet; 
Miss Dorothy Ziegler, of the National Symphony Orchestra, of- 
fers instruction in brass instruments; Mr. Levin Houston, Past 
President of the Virginia Music Teachers Association, offers in- 
struction in piano; Mrs. Vera Neely Ross, teacher of voice in the 
Washington Institute of Music, offers instruction in voice; and 
Dr. Charlotte Klein, Concert Organist of Washington, offers in- 
struction in organ and piano. The charge for individual instruc- 
tion, one lesson a week, in these special courses in applied music is 
$32.00 for one quarter, plus a $3.00 practice fee. One to three 
credits a quarter are given for each course in freshman and sophomore 
classes, and one to five credits a quarter are given for each course in 
junior and senior classes, with relative adjustments in fees according 
to the amount of credit received. 

To facilitate registration for courses in applied music the fol- 
lowing system of notation is used: 

Music 131-132-133. Piano, first year. 

Music 231-232-233. Piano, second year. 

Music 331-332-333. Piano, third year. 

Music 431-432-433. Piano, fourth year. 



Physical and Health Education 147 

Music 141-142-143. Voice, first year. 

Music 241-242-243. Voice, second year. 

Music 341-342-343. Voice, third year. 

Music 441-442-443. Voice, fourth year. 

Music 151-152-153. Organ, first year. 

Music 251-252-253. Organ, second year. 

Music 351-352-353. Organ, third year. 

Music 451-452-453. Organ, fourth year. 

Music 165-166-167. Violin, viola, violoncello, contrabass, 

harp, flute, clarinet, saxophone. (State instrument in 

registering.) First year. 
Music 265-266-267. Same, second year. 
Music 361-362-363. Same, third year. 
Music 461-462-463. Same, fourth year. 
In registering for courses in applied music, the student should 
state whether regular or special instruction is desired. 

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 
AND HEALTH SERVICE 

Professors Andrews, Kelly 
Associate Professor *Stewart 
Assistant Professors *Hoye, *Mary C. Baker, 
Katherine E. Griffith, Jones 
Instructors Manter, Walther, Wells 
College Physician Dr. Whitticar 
Resident Nurses Miss Trible, Miss Johnson, Mrs. Jones 
Health and physical education occupy an important place in 
the curriculum of the college. The arrangement is such that a stu- 
dent may become reasonably proficient in several different activities, 
and conversant with conventions of these and of other sports. 

Every effort is exerted that each student may acquire an intel- 
ligent point of view concerning her own health and the amounts of 
participation in muscular activity adequate to maintain her personal 
efficiency. 

Requirements for a major in Physical Education 
Completion of Curriculum VI (pages 93-94) is required for 

a major in Physical Education. 

Substitutions for elementary courses may be made in those cases 

in which a student presents evidence of proficiency. 



♦Absent on leave, military service, 1944-45. 



148 Mary Washington College 

Requirements for a minor in Physical Education 

Qr. Hrs. 

Physical Education 130-246-120-241-242-248 6 

Physical Education 236 2 

Physical Education 325-326-327 6 

Physical Education Electives 13 

Notes: 

1. Unless excused by the college physician, every student must 
pass the swimming exemption test or Physical Education 115 before 
graduation. 

2. Health Education 100, Hygiene, is required of all students 
who are candidates for degrees. 

3. Students who are recommended by the college physician to 
be excused from regular Physical Education shall report for a course 
in modified activity. Consult the head of the department. 

4. Credit toward a degree is limited to three quarter hours 
in Equitation. 

5. It is strongly recommended that a student distribute elec- 
tive courses in Physical Education in such a manner as to include 
various activities during her college career, and it is suggested that 
these courses include one team sport, one individual sport, one 
rhythmic activity, and the intermediate or advanced level in any one 
activity. 

6. Physical education costume should not be ordered before 
instructions are received from the college. 

Health Education 100. Hygiene. A course in fulfilment of the West 
Law of the State of Virginia. It includes a study of principles of health 
education, personal and community hygiene, social hygiene, mental hygiene, 
first aid, practice in giving physical examinations, and methods of hygiene 
instruction. Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. 
Three credits. 

Physical Education 115. Beginners Swimming. The purpose of 
this course is to enable the individual to overcome fear of the water, and be 
able to swim at least one length of the pool. It includes elements of swim- 
ming such as correct breathing, back and face floating, elementary back 
stroke, and diving from the side of the pool. Three periods a week for 
first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $3.00. 

Physical Education 120. Fundamentals of Rhythmic Activities. 

Required of all students in Curriculum VI. This course presents the fun- 
damentals of rhythm and movement. A variety of rhythmic activities 
is covered — singing games, folk dances and the fundamentals of tap danc- 
ing. Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One 
credit Fee, $2.00. 



Physical and Health Education 149 

Physical Education 130. Games. Required of all students in Cur- 
riculum VI. Materials covered include games for elementary and second- 
ary schools. Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. 
One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 150. Self Testing Activities. Three periods 
a week for the second quarter. One credit. 

♦Physical Education 171. Beginners Equitation. The purpose of 
this course is to enable the student to ride a gentle horse with safety and 
enjoyment using a balanced forward seat at three gaits. Two double periods 
a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $40.00.f 

Physical Education 181-182-183. Modernistic Ballet. Both begin- 
ning and advanced work in modernistic ballet techniques. Solo and group 
work. Two double periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. 
Fee, $2.00 a quarter. 

Physical Education 211. First Aid and Safety Education. This 

course includes: (a) a study of theory and practice in first aid, leading to 
the American Red Cross certificate; and (b) an examination of safety needs 
and measures. Three periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 
Fee, $1.00. 

Physical Education 215. Intermediate Swimming. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 115 or its equivalent. Development of form and efficiency 
in the standard strokes and dives. Three periods a week for the first 
quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $3.00. 

Physical Education 233. Campcraft. The history, aims, ideals, re- 
quirements and standards of Campfire and Scouting and similar organiza- 
tions are studied. Theory and practical work in conducting hikes, camp 
cooking, campcraft, etc., are given. The course is particularly interesting 
to girls who wish to be counselors in summer camps. Four periods a week 
for third quarter. Two credits. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 236. Leadership in Community Recreation. 
Required of all students taking a major or a minor in physical education. 
This course presents the organization and administration of some phases 
of community recreation — playgrounds, play days, community centers, sum- 
mer and day camps. Two periods a week for first quarter. Two credits. 

Physical Education 237. Social Sports. This course includes in- 
dividual and dual sports such as badminton, table tennis, paddle tennis, 
ring tennis, shuffleboard, etc. Three periods a week. Offered each quarter. 
One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 240. Fundamentals of Body Balance and 
Movement. This course is designed to improve body alignment, balance, 
and poise, and to develop greater ease and efficiency in movement. The stu- 
dent learns how to decrease existing tension in the body and how to go 
about her daily activities in such a way as to avoid undue fatigue. Three 
periods a week. Offered each quarter. One credit Fee, $1.00. 

Physical Education 241. Beginners Softball. Three periods a 
week for third quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 



♦Written permission of parent or guardian must be present before enrollment in 
this course may be completed. Each student has an opportunity to ride in both the 
Gymkhana and the Annual Horse Show. 

tRiding for recreation, without credit, one hour a week a quarter, fee, $15.00. 
Two hours a week: fee, $25.00. 



150 Mary Washington College 

Physical Education 242. Beginners Basketball. Three periods a 
week for second quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 243. Beginners Modern Dance. This course 
presents the fundamentals of movement, rhythm, accompaniment, and de- 
sign. Special emphasis is placed upon the development of the body as 
an instrument. Three periods a week. Repeated each quarter. One credit. 
Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 244. Folk and National Dances. Prerequisite: 
Fundamentals of Rhythmic Activities. This course presents folk and na- 
tional dances, the customs, costumes, occupations of the people and the 
effects of these upon the dances are studied. Three periods a week for 
the first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 245. Golf. Three periods a week for first quar- 
ter. Repeated third quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 246. Beginners Field Hockey. Three periods 
a week for first quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 247. Beginners Soccer and Speedball. Three 
periods a week for first quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 248. Archery. Three periods a week for first 
and third quarters. One credit. Fee, $20.0. 

Physical Education 249. Tennis. Three periods a week for first and 
third quarters. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 250. Social Dancing. This course in modern 
ballroom dancing is offered for the novice. Fundamentals, popular steps, 
and social usages are presented. Three periods a week for the first quar- 
ter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 252. Fencing. This course presents the funda- 
mentals of foil fencing. Required equipment consists of a foil, helmet and 
fencing jacket or plastron. Three periods a week for the second quarter. 
One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 260. Physical Education for Elementary 
Grades. Materials and methods in physical education appropriate for va- 
rious elementary grades. Problems of organization and direction. Three 
periods a week for second quarter. Three credits. 

*Physical Education 271. Intermediate Equitation. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 171 or permission of instructor. Development of form 
and control at the walk, trot, and canter to both leads. Two double periods 
a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $40.00f 

Physical Education 315. Advanced Swimming. Development of 
speed and endurance in swimming and skill in diving. Three periods a week 
for second and third quarters. One credit. Fee, $3.00. 

Physical Education 325. History of Physical Education. A study 
of the development of physical education. The viewpoint gained from this 
course should serve as a basis for interpretating present trends in physical 
education and their relation to general education. Two periods a week 
for first quarter. Two credits. 

♦Permission of parent or guardian must be presented in writing before enrollment 
in this course may be completed. Each student has an opportunity to ride in both 
the Gymkhana and the Annual Horse Show. 

tRiding for recreation, without credit, one hour a week a quarter, fee, $15.00. 
Two hours a week: fee, $25.00. 



Physical Education 151 

Physical Education 326. Organization and Administration o£ 
Physical Education. A discussion of the general philosophy and principles 
of physical education as applied to program planning with adaptation to 
specific situations, plant, facilities, costume, standards, tests and measure- 
ments and leadership. Two periods a week for second quarter. Two 
credits. 

Physical Education 327. Procedures in Physical Education. 
Deals with conduct of physical education program with special reference to 
source materials, library facilities, visual aids, and professional associations. 
Two periods a week for third quarter. Two credits. 

Physical Education 342. Intermediate Basketball. Three periods 
a week for second quarter. One credit. 

Physical Education 343. Intermediate Modern Dance. Prerequi- 
site: Physical Education 243. The skill of the group determines the tech- 
niques which will be given. Special attention is given to dance composition, 
its relation to daily life and its place as an art form. Three periods a 
week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 344. Tap Dancing. Prerequisite: Physical Edu- 
cation 120. Simple tap routines progressing in difficulty; complete analy- 
sis of fundamental steps, and original routines worked out using funda- 
mentals learned. Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated second 
quarter. One credit. Fee, $1.00. 

Physical Education 345. Intermediate Golf. Prerequisite: Phys- 
ical Education 245 or its equivalent. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Repeated third quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 348. Intermediate Archery. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 248 or its equivalent. Three periods a week for first 
quarter. Repeated third quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 349. Intermediate Tennis. Prerequisite: Phys- 
ical Education 249 or its equivalent. Three periods a week for first quarter. 
Repeated third quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 

Physical Education 350. Rhythmic Gymnastics. Sequences from 
Danish and other exercises for the purpose of general physiological con- 
ditioning, developing the sense of rhythm and improving motor coordination. 
Three periods a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. 

*Physical Education 371. Advanced Equitation. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 271 or permission of the instructor. Development of 
further skill in figure eights, posting to both diagonals, figure riding, etc. 
Jumping is offered to the students who are more proficient. Two double 
periods a week for first quarter. Repeated each quarter. One credit. 
Fee, $40.00.t 



♦Permission of parent or guardian must be presented in writing before enrollment 
in this course may be completed. Each student has an opportunity to ride in both 
the Gymkhana and the Annual Horse Show. 

tRiding for recreation, without credit, one hour a week a quarter, fee, $15.00. 
Two hoursi a week: fee, $25.00. 



152 Mary Washington College 

Physical Education 412. Postural Deviations. Prerequisite: Phys- 
ical Education 413. Planned for students intending to teach Physical Edu- 
cation, this course provides an opportunity: (a) to study efficiency in body 
balance and movement; (b) to analyze postural deviations and to gain 
experience in selecting and using techniques to alleviate them; (c) to gain 
experience in selecting and using Physical Education materials for atypical 
children; (d) to learn fundamentals of massage. Three single and two 
double periods a week for second quarter. Five credit. 

Physical Education 413. Body Mechanics. Prerequisites: Biology 
337 and 338. This course includes a detailed study of the mechanics in- 
volved in body movements. Movement of the separate joints and body 
segments is considered both individually and in their relation to the entire 
body. Action of individual muscles and of muscle groups is studied espe- 
cially in its application to activities involved in sports and in everyday 
living. Three periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. 

Physical Education 414. Applied Physiology. Prerequisite: Physi- 
ology 373. A study of reactions in the human body resulting from physical 
activity. Consideration is given the adjustment made by organs and sys- 
tems of the body individually and in relation to the functioning of the 
entire mechanism. Three periods a week for third quarter. Offered alter- 
nate years. Three credits. 

Physical Education 415. Life Saving. Instruction in modern 
methods of life saving and water-front protection as outlined by the American 
Red Cross. Those who pass the course are qualified as Senior Red Cross 
Life Savers. Four periods a week for third quarter. Two credits. Fee, 

$3.00. 

Physical Education 421-422-423. Officiating and Coaching. Open 
to senior students majoring in physical education. Members of the class 
participate in the organization and direction of selected physical education 
activities. Three periods a week for the session. One credit each quarter. 

Physical Education 443. Advanced Modern Dance. Prerequisite: 
Physical Education 343. This course presents advanced techniques. The 
student is encouraged to do original choreography. Three periods a week 
for the quarter. One credit. Fee, $2.00. 



SCIENCE 

Professors Cook, Castle, litis 

Associate Professor Pyle 

Assistant Professors Schultz, Peirce, Insley, Britt, Bryson 

The work of this department is planned to give the student a 
specialized knowledge in certain fields of science; to give the neces- 
sary foundation in other departments where science is used; and to 
prepare teachers of science. 



Science 153 

Requirements for a major in Science 

Qr. Hrs. 

Biology 121-122-123 9 or 12 

Chemistry 211-212-213 9 or 12 

Two junior or senior Science courses 18 

Requirements for a minor in Science 

Qr. Hrs. 

Biology 121-122-123 9 or 12 

Chemistry 211-212-213 9 or 12 

One junior or senior Science course 9 

No credit is allowed for less than one full session of any science 
that is offered for three quarters as a continuous course. 

Beginning with the session of 1945-46, the following courses 
will meet for three single and one double period a week and carry 
four credits each quarter. 

Biology 121-122-123 
Chemistry 211-212-213 
Physics 401-402-403 

Astronomy 

Astronomy 361-362-363. Elementary Astronomy. An historical 
and descriptive survey of the physical universe. Our current knowledge of 
the solar system, the stars, and nebulae is presented. Three periods a week 
for the session. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each quarter. 

Biology 

Biology 121-122-123. General Biology. The purpose of this series 
of courses is (1) to introduce the student to those broad biological prin- 
ciples that underlie all living things; (2) to present a survey of the world 
of living things in relation to the environment; (3) to indicate some of the 
larger applications of biological principles to education and to the improve- 
ment of our social conditions; and (4) to assist in training teachers of 
biology. Lectures, discussions, field excursions, and the laboratory are em- 
ployed. Three single and one double period a week for each quarter. Four 
credits for each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 

Biology 337-338. Human Anatomy. Prerequisite: Biology 122. A 
study of the structure of the body with emphasis upon the skeletal and 
muscular systems. Three periods a week for second and third quarters. 
Three credits each quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 

Biology 341. Field Zoology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. 
Lecture, laboratory, and field study of the common wild animals of the region, 
with emphasis on classification, animal behavior, and ecological conditions. 
Teaching collections are made. Two single and one double period a week, 
plus field trips during the quarter. First quarter. Three credits. Offered 
in alternate years. Fee, $3.00. 



154 Mary Washington College 

Biology 342. Bacteriology. Prerequisite: Biology 122 and pref- 
erably Chemistry 213. A general course, including laboratory work in cultur- 
ing, isolating, staining, and studying economically important reactions of 
bacteria and related forms, and library and lecture work on phases of 
economic importance. One single and two double periods a week for second 
quarter. Three credits. Fee, $5.00. 

Biology 343. Heredity and Eugenics. Prerequisite: Biology 122. A 
study of the more important laws of heredity, and their applications to 
domesticated plants and animals, and to inheritance in human beings. One 
single and two double periods a week for third quarter. Three credits. 
Offered in alternate years. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 351. Plant Physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. 
This course deals with the vital activities of plants, such as photosynthesis, 
respiration, absorption, translocation, response to stimuli, etc. One single 
and two double periods a week for first quarter. Three credits. Offered 
in alternate years. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 352. Plant Anatomy. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. A 
course dealing with the internal structure of the vascular plants. A study 
is made of the origin, development, and relation of tissues to the functions 
of organs. One single and two double periods a week for second quarter. 
Three credits. Offered in alternate years. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 353. Field Botany. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. This 
course acquaints the student with the local seed plants and ferns. Emphasis 
is placed on wild plants but the cultivated plants receive some attention. 
Students are expected to make collections of local plants, to identify them, 
and to prepare keys. One single and two double periods a week for third 
quarter. Three credits. Offered in alternate years. Fee, $3.00. 

Biology 373. Physiology. Prerequisite: Biology 121-122-123. A 
study of the functioning of the systems of the body with emphasis on basic 
physiological principles. One double and two single periods a week for 
first quarter. Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 211-212-213. Inorganic Chemistry. This course is in- 
tended to acquaint the students with the fundamental laws of chemistry and 
to give them a general knowledge of the most important elements and their 
inorganic compounds. One double and three single periods a week for the 
session. Four credits each quarter. Fee, $5.00 each quarter. 

Chemistry 301-302-303. Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 211-212-213 or equivalent. This course covers briefly the theory and 
practice of qualitative analysis. One single and two double periods a 
week for the session. Three credits a quarter. Fee, $5.00 each quarter. 

Chemistry 311-312. Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
211-212-213 or the equivalent. This course is planned to give the student 
an introduction to the aliphatic and aromatic organic compounds. One dou- 
ble and two single periods a week for the two quarters. Three credits each 
quarter. Fee, $5.00 each quarter. 

Chemistry 313. Biological Chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 311 
or 312 or equivalent. This course comprises the study of foods, digestion, 
nutrition, etc. One double and two single periods a week for third quarter. 
Three credits. Fee, $3.00. 



Science 155 



Chemistry 431-432-433. Quantitative Analysis. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 301 and 302 or equivalent. This course introduces the student to the 
theory and technique of quantitative analysis. One single and two double 
periods a week for the session. Three credits a quarter. Fee, $5.00 each 
quarter. 

Geology 

Geology 321-322-323. Elementary Geology. This course is de- 
signed to give the student an introduction to the fundamental principles of 
geology, including a general discussion of structural, physiographical, and 
historical geology. One double and two single periods a week for the ses- 
sion. In addition to the regular class periods a number of field trips are 
required. Three credits each quarter. Fee, $1.00 each quarter. 



Physics 

Physics 401-402-403. This course covers briefly the main topics in 
heat, light, electricity, sound, and mechanics. One double and three single 
periods a week for the session. Four credits each quarter. Fee, $5.00 
each quarter. 

Science 

t*Science 381-382-383. Environmental Science. This course con- 
sists of a survey of the fundamental sciences. These are taught in an inte- 
grated form rather than as separate sciences. Its main aim is to prepare 
teachers to teach science in the elementary grades. This course should also 
give the student sufficient training in science and scientific thinking to enable 
her to appreciate the natural phenomena of her environment. One double 
period and two single periods per week for the session. Three credits each 
quarter. Fee, $3.00 each quarter. 

Science 421. Clinical Laboratory. This course is designed to give 
the student an elementary knowledge of the principles involved in clinical 
laboratory practice. Three double periods a week for the first quarter. 
This course is open only to students taking the Medical-Technician course. 
Three credits. Fee, $5.00. 

Science 422-423. Clinical Practice. This course consists of clinical 
practice work by the students in medical offices. Three double periods or 
the equivalent per week per quarter. Medical-Technician students are re- 
quired to take one quarter, but they may elect one other quarter. Three 
credits each quarter. 



*Note. — Limited to students majoring or minoring in elementary education. Elec- 
tive credit only ; not counted toward major or minor in science. 
tNote. — Not to be offered after session of 1946-47. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June 1944 

Bachelors of Arts 

Adie, Jean Eleanor Palisade, N. J. 

Barrett, Dorothy Leftwich Norfolk, Va. 

Bower, Shirley Hollingsworth Unionville, Conn. 

Bowers, Elizabeth Mahoney Fredericksburg, Va. 

Broun, Ethel Mae Norfolk, Va. 

Clark, Ava Clayton Abingdon, Va. 

Cochran, Charline Combs j; Atlanta, Ga. 

Cumby, Elizabeth Rodenhizer Blackstone, Va. 

Davis, Betty Louise Ft Jennings, Ohio 

Davis, Joyce Louise Berryville, Va. 

Engleman, Rebecca Katherine Fredericks Hall, Va. 

Farmer, Margaret Ann South Boston, Va. 

Garretson, Corabel Cape May Court House, N. J. 

Glascock, Mary Ellen South Boston, Va. 

Goffigon, Kathleen Hallett Capeville, Va. 

Goolrick, Virginia Lindlay Fredericksburg, Va. 

Green, Anne Mazyck Wilmington, N. C. 

Guarch, Evangeline Manati, Puerto Rico 

Harris, Ann Shenton Fredericksburg, Va. 

Herron, Mary Lena Norfolk, Va. 

Irvine, Mildred Tate Petersburg, Va. 

Kennedy, Marie Pegram Southern Pines, N. C. 

Kilmer, Elizabeth Buford Arlington, Va. 

Kingston, Roberta Baltimore, Md. 

Klinesmith, Mary Annette Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Lavore, Olga Julia Long Island City, N. Y. 

Leonard, Dorothy Harley Quantico, Va. 

McCartney, Virginia Olive Yonkers, N. Y. 

Morgan, Mary Virginia Lynchburg, Va. 

Morris, Patricia Tomasina Longmeadow, Mass. 

Nickerson, Theodora Lillian East Harwich, Mass. 

Payne, Joyce Louise Fredericksburg, Va. 

Pumphrey, Virginia Fay Arlington, Va. 

Pusey, Constance Maddox Heathsville, Va. 

Rose, Julia Hoffman La Crosse, Va. 

Ruckman, Maxine Hilda Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Ryland, Mildred Suzanne Arlington, Va. 

Samuel, Amy Ruth Wellville, Va. 

Scott, Martha Segar Bridgetown, Va. 



Degrees Conferred 157 

Shade, Jeanne Bowman Winchester, Va. 

Slingraan, Edith Jane New Britain, Conn. 

Smith, Betty Brewster Tampa, Fla. 

Smith, Frances Lee Ivor, Va. 

Tallman, Nathalie Frances Fairhaven, Mass. 

Taylor, Elizabeth Dolores Miami Beach, Fla. 

Thomas, Edith Mays Stony Creek, Va. 

Thompson, Edna Fernetta . Athol, Mass. 

Walder, Susie Harrison Maidens, Va. 

Watts, Anna Belle Amherst, Va. 

Whitehurst, Frances Mae Petersburg, Va. 

Williamson, Jean Bayly Fredericksburg, Va. 

Winston, Jane Trevvett Richmond, Va. 

Woodson, Dorothy Louise Clifton Forge, Va. 

Bachelors of Science 

Adair, Elizabeth Hudson Pulaski, Va. 

Anderson, Jayne Larchmont, N. Y. 

Armstrong, Cora Virginia Midland, Va. 

Aylor, Cecile Waites _ Brightwood, Va. 

Aziz, Mary Alice , New Britain, Conn. 

Balash, Helen Olena Elmira Heights, N. Y. 

Baldwin, Marjorie Couper Norfolk, Va. 

Barnes, Mae Chappel Kenbridge, Va. 

Ball, Grace McKinnon Maxton, N. C. 

Benner, Anne Rebecca Warrenton, Va. 

Boush, Eileen Lindsley London Bridge, Va. 

Boyd, Helen Leslie Honaker, Va. 

Brightwell, Margaret Holmes Randolph, Va. 

Brownley, Jane Phyllis Washington, D. C. 

Brumble, Katherine Stuart T. Richmond, Va. 

Buchanan, Anne Blair Raphine, Va. 

Bulkley, Helen Frances Westport, Conn. 

Butler, Virginia Hawley Hopewell, Va. 

Carswell, Cena Loback Blakely, Ga. 

Charles, Arebelia Mae Arlington, Va. 

Clark, Anne Lenoir Petersburg, Va. 

Clark, Miriam Cornforth West Springfield, Mass. 

Clements, Violet Muriel Saluda, Va. 

Cochran, Bettye Wallace Washington, D. C. 

Cofer, Marjorie Glenna Newport News, Va. 

Coleman, Helen Boyette Goldsboro, N. C. 

Cook, Louise Morris Northfolk, W. Va. 

Coward, Christine LaVonne Rockingham, N. C. 

Cox, Elizabeth White East Woodstock, Conn. 

Cray, Claire Ann Pennington, N. J. 

Cryer, Marjora Marie Kingsport, Tenn. 

Dahl, Monika Madeleine St George, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Davis, Elisabeth Hancock Arlington, Va. 

DeMerritt, Eleanor Northampton, Mass. 

DeShazo, Jean Virginia . Fredericksburg, Va. 

Doswell, Mary Houston Richmond, Va. 

Drake, Dorothy Jean Palisade, N. J. 

Duke, Margaret Elizabeth Bakerton, W. Va. 

Duval, Nancy Turner Richmond, Va. 



158 Mary Washington College 



Early, Nellie Wade Bealeton, Va. 

Edwards, Helen . Litchfield, Conn. 

Elwell, Dorothy Arlene Methuen, Mass. 

Erabrey, Ruth Rebecca Hartwood, Va. 

Epstein, Gloria Lee ^ Newport News, Va. 

Evans, Nettie Lee Laneview, Va. 

Farrell, Frances Barham Portsmouth, Va. 

Faulkner, Margaret Elizabeth Portsmouth, Va. 

Feaster, Joan Margaret . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fitzsimmons, Janet Evelyn Peekskill, N. Y. 

Fleet, Leah Rubenette Maplewood, N. Y. 

Ford, Mary Jean Buchanan, Va. 

Fourqurean, Dorothy Virginia Lynchburg, Va. 

Franklin, Beatryce Browne Alexandria, Va. 

Garber, Virginia Glenn Hampton, Va. 

Gardiner, Mary Ellen LaPlate, Md. 

Gibson, Betty Llewellyn Richmond, Va. 

Gifford, Sarah . Weedsport, N. Y. 

Goad, Elise Rush Hillsville, Va. 

Godfrey, Nina Coralie Jones Alexandria, Va. 

Gooch, Nellie Gray Richmond, Va. 

Gorham, Elizabeth Ann Lancaster, Pa. 

Goyne, Adele Marie Chester, Va. 

Gravatt, Nancy Jane Milford, Va. 

Graves, Alice Brockman Mineral, Va. 

Griffin, Mary Genevieve Portsmouth, Va. 

Gubler, Ruth Ester Ardsley, N. Y. 

Hall, Christine Lee Roanoke, Va. 

Hall, Mary Emeline Windsor, Va. 

Hall, Myrtle Oakley : Halifax, Va. 

Hall, Yvonne Wachapreague, Va. 

Hamilton, Gertrude Corbly Nassawadox, Va. 

Hannon, Grace Marie Ridgewood, N. J. 

Harris, Sallie Hart Stevensburg, Va. 

Heatley, Enid Elaine Washington, D. C. 

Helvestine, Elizabeth Randolph Clifton Forge, Va. 

Herbert, Adrienne Louise Richmond, Va. 

Hilldrup, Isabel Eleanor Chancellor, Va. 

Holloway, Frances B. Inglis Fredericksburg, Va. 

Holloway, Hildah Forrest Yorktown, Va. 

Hovey, Joyce Marion Houlton, Me. 

Howard, Emily Winchester Edenton, N. C. 

Hoylman, Henrietta Harriet Clifton Forge, Va. 

Hudson, Margaret Ellijay, Ga. 

Hudson, Marjorie Helen , Roswell, N. M. 

Hunter, Violet Marie . Waynesboro, Va. 

Jeffries, Hazel Evelyn Richmond, Va. 

Johnson, Lucy Traies Manassas, Va. 

Johnston, Pauline Brown Carson, Va. 

Jones, Emily Edwards Smithfield, Va. 

Kilby, Emelia-Louise Jepson Hartford, Conn. 

Klenck, Marguerite Plainfield, N. J. 

Krout, Jean Louise Nutley, N. J. 

Lane, Joan Doris Ridgefield Park, N. J. 

Lautenschlager, Elizabeth Mayer Fort Lee, N. J. 

Leitch, Fay Antoinette Fredericksburg, Va. 

Lioutza, Carrie Ann Norland, Va. 



Degrees Conferred 159 

Ludtke, Ruth Loraine Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McCain, Mary Elizabeth Danville, Va. 

McCrane, Mary Clare Teaneck, N. J. 

McDaniel, Ruth Lee Jeffersonton, Va. 

McPhail, Betty Carolyn Lakeland, Fla. 

McPhail, Bertha Marce Lakeland, Fla. 

Martell, Marjorie Lucille Sutton, Mass. 

Miller, Helen Gray Ashton, Md. 

Munn, Beverly Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Murden, Ann Holt , Portsmouth, Va. 

Murphy, Elizabeth Lou . Norton, Va. 

Neel, Marie Colleen Gratton, Va. 

Neighbours, Lucille Marguerite , SaltviHe, Va. 

Newsome, Nellie Moss Emporia, Va. 

Obuhanych, Sophia Nikitovna Elmira Heights, N. Y. 

Omohundro, Eleanor Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Ornstein, Jannie Simone New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Parkhill, Shirley Ethel West Springfield, Mass. 

Perfette, Alda Irene Staten Island, N. Y. 

Phillips, Elizabeth Bailey Hampton, Va. 

Plunkett, Mary Frances Pulaski, Va. 

Potts, Josephine Pennsgrove, N. J. 

Powers, Doris Port Royal, Va. 

Quimby, Phyllis Livingston, N. J. 

Roberts, Anna Austin Sudlersville, Md. 

Robinson, Mary Irene High Point, N. C. 

Roller, Sallie Jones Arlington, Va. 

Rolley, Elaine Doane Cheriton, Va. 

Rubush, Virginia Noel Monterey, Va. 

Samuels, Reba Elizabeth Orange, Va. 

Schipke, Joyce Marion Wallingford, Conn. 

Schwarz, Alma Ruth West Hartford, Conn. 

Scott, Lilias Ritchie Fredericksburg, Va. 

Sherlock, Virginia Claire Niantic, Conn. 

Shufflebarger, Doris Lee Bland, Va. 

Smith, Virginia Adair Mt. Hope, W. Va. 

Stearns, Elizabeth Lewis Fredericksburg, Va. 

Stormgren, Barbara Rowley West Simsbury, Conn. 

Strong, Hazel Teed Warwick, N. Y. 

Swartz, Mary Gertrude Sidney, N. Y. 

Thompson, Tressa Yvonne Birmingham, Mich. 

Tilden, Martha Louise High Point, N. C. 

Tracey, Frances Votey Summit, N. J. 

Trotta, Angie Evelyn Fredericksburg, Va. 

Turner, Carolyn Jane Roanoke, Va. 

Turner, Helen Hawley Hopewell, Va. 

Turner, Mary Reams Hopewell, Va. 

Updike, Merle Louise Orleans, Va. 

Vassar, Christine Mae Charlotte Court House, Va. 

Wade, Elizabeth Jean Clifton Forge, Va. 

Walker, Virginia Caroline Bedford, Va. 

Walls, Harriett Elizabeth Sudlersville, Md. 



160 Mary Washington College 



Watkins, Julia Nixon Sutherland, Va. 

Watts, Mary Carolyn Parksley, Va. 

Weiss, Ebon Norma , Andover, Mass. 

Wells, Virginia Hazelwood Smithfield, Va. 

Westcott, Ruth Naomi Metuchen, N. J. 

Wheatley, Marjorie Elizabeth Roanoke, Va. 

Wilson, Betty Bondurant Farmville, Va. 

Wiseman, Virginia Lucas. Rapidan, Va. 

Woodward, Frances Virginia Saluda, Va. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

Session 1944-45 

Abell, Marie Palmer McLean, Va. 

Abrams, Jane Springfield, Mass. 

Abreo, Nancy Lee Washington, D. C. 

Acton, Allene Louisa . Portsmouth, Va. 

Acton, Anne Lee Portsmouth, Va. 

Adair, Frances Omega Pulaski, Va. 

Adams, Dorothy Mae W. Allenhurst, N. J. 

Adams, Vivian Marie _ — Red Oak, Va. 

Addison, Mary Farguhar Richmond, Va. 

Affinito, Gloria Johanne .—New Haven, Conn. 

Affleck, Eula Jeannette . — Winchester, Va. 

Akers, Nancy Virginia . Lynchburg, Va. 

Albro, Irene Louisa New Britain, Conn. 

Alderman, Martha Ruby Richmond, Va. 

Alford, Mary Gene Hopewell, Va. 

Allen, Betty Byrnes '. W. Springfield, Mass. 

Allen, Ella Lee , Amelia, Va. 

Allen, Margaret Frances Glen Allen, Va. 

Allen, Mary Hunter Boydton, Va. 

Allen, Miriam Lois Salem, Va. 

Altenberger, Betty Jane Tenafly, N. J. 

Alvey, Frances Ellen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Ambrose, Dolores Mae Neptune City, N. J. 

Anderson, Carol Engh Newton, Mass. 

Anderson, Charlotte Jane Man, W. Va. 

Anderson, Lois Janet Skokie, 111. 

Anderson, Lucy Mason Richmond, Va. 

Anderson, Margaret Fern Falls Church, Va. 

Anderson, Marilyn Lee Covington, Va. 

Anderson, Mary Ann . Chatham, Va. 

Andrew, Janet Hough Hilton Village, Va. 

Andrews, Betty Joan \ Rowland, N. C. 

Andross, Jacquelyn W. Hartford, Conn. 

Armstrong, Sarah Margaret Leesburg, Fla. 

Arrington, Dorothy Edith Haysi, Va. 

Arrow, Virginia Elizabeth : Pittsfield, Mass. 

Ashman, Margaret Eleanor Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Ashton, June Carolyn-. Tetotum, Va. 

Atkins, Betty Gwyne Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Atkinson, Clara Wilson . Rawlings, Va. 

Avery, Emily King Fredericksburg, Va. 

Avery, Jane Catherine Richmond, Va. 

Ayala, Emma Neal Key West, Fla. 

Backner, Jacqueline Sidney Haddonfield, N. J. 

Bacon, Dorothy B Fredericksburg, Va. 

Badillo, Auristela Rosa Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Bague, Anita Celia „„_Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Bailey, Grace Hamilton—.. . Richmond, Va. 

Bailey, Grace James _„„_ Moseley, Va. 

Bailey, Leland Theodora™ Buckroe Beach, Va. 

Bailey, Virginia Mary___ __ Richmond, Va. 

Baldwin, Jean Marie _ . Atlee, Va. 

Baldwin, Virginia Claire Atlee, Va. 

Bane, Elizabeth Holland „ Marion, Va. 

Bane, Lucy McDonald Bland. Va, 



162 Mary Washington College 

Banisch, Elizabeth Marie Ashland, Va. 

Barber, Stella Blanche . Marietta, Ga. 

Barbour, Virginia Anne . Hampton, Va. 

Bardill, Mary Helen —Harriman, Tenn. 

Barkalow, Ellen Mae Alexandria, Va. 

Barkalow, Evelyn Lida . Alexandria, Va. 

Barker, Evelyn Wilson Danville, Va. 

Barksdale, Bettie Anne . : . Halifax, Va. 

Barksdale, Emily Randolph „ Halifax, Va. 

Barnes, Anne Evelyn . Norfolk, Va. 

Bartholomew, Ann Brannan Richmond, Va. 

Barton, Anna Murray Centerville, Md. 

Barton, Mary Murray —Rockbridge, Va. 

Bates, Elizabeth Marie . Charleston, S. C. 

Batty, Estelle Marjorie Norfolk, Va. 

Bauerline, Jaclyn Edith ; West Orange, N. J. 

Baumgardner, Alice Miles ,_ —Arlington, Va. 

Baxter, Mary Ellen . . Petersburg, Va. 

Beadles, Beverley Sledd ,_ : _ Richmond, Va. 

Beames, Phyllis Joann . Washington, D. C. 

Beard, Geneva Gott ___„„_„ _„ Annapolis, Md. 

Beasley, Emma Janet Fredericksburg, Va. 

Beazley, Bessie Louise - . Bowling Green, Va. 

Behm, Patricia Ann „ Washington, Va. 

Bell, Jean Anne —_„_—___ „ . Suffolk, Va. 

Bell, Phyllis Helen ——Putnam, Conn. 

Belman, Frances Pratt — Fredericksburg, Va. 

Beltram, Aida Alicia . . Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Bender, Betty Janet Bluefield, W. Va. 

Benedictt, Elizabeth D . Salem, Ohio 

Bennett, Elizabeth R — Richmond, Va. 

Bennett, Janes Delores_. Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Bennett, Louise Marilyn .__ Morrisville, Pa. 

Berger, Nancy Swanson . Gretna, Va. 

Berry, Florence Ann . - —Falls Church, Va. 

Bevell, Nancy Inez . . Blackstone, Va. 

Bible, Frances Lee .___ Roanoke, Va. 

Billingsley, Corrine Gordon Arlington, Va. 

Binns, Floyd T „. „ „ Culpeper, Va. 

Bippus, Anne Clarke Hilton Village, Va. 

Birdsall, Pauline H Petersburg, Va. 

Bishop, Maude Anstis Cranford, N. J. 

Black, Carolyn Leap , Elkton, Va. 

Blackburn, Barbara Jane Fredericksburg, Va. 

Blackwell, Betty Claughton Remo, Va. 

Blake, Lois Corinee _ Capahosic, Va. 

Blake, Mary Martha Norristown, Pa. 

Bliven, Margaret Mitchell Erie, Pa. 

Blosser, Julia Nelle Harrisonburg, Va. 

Blue, Marie Louise , —Alexandria, Va. 

Boiling, Ruth Carolyn Norris, Tenn. 

Boiling, Ruth Jean —Concord Depot, Va. 

Bondurant, Mary Elizabeth Rice, Va. 

Bonell, Sally Ann Arlington, Va. 

Bono, Ellen Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Booth, Dorothy Maryon . Saltsville, Va. 

Booth, Shirley Ann i . Youngstown, Ohio 

Borgett, Geraldine Gloria Woodbridge, N. J. 

Bourne, Emily Waller Miami Beach, Fla. 

Bowe, Jean Harris Capleville, Tenn. 

Bowen, Alison Louise Sacramento, Cal. 

Bowen, Beverly Pelham, N. Y. 



Register of Students 163 



Bowles, Betty Louise -, Tucson, Ariz. 

Bowling, Ruth Catherine . . — Faulkner, Md. 

Bowman, Pauline M. Rochellc, Va. 

Boyce, Jean Audrey Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Boyd, Dorothy Jane . — , Richmond, Va. 

Boyer, Mary Louise . . , . Shacklefords, Va. 

Boyer, Ruth Houston Woodstock, Va. 

Brackett, Eleanor G. -~, Newtonville, Mass. 

Bradley, Martha Ann . Danville, Va. 

Bradshaw, Eva Lucile Messick, Va. 

Bragg, Barbara Inez \ Alberta, Va. 

Brail, Adelaide Louise Freeport, N. Y. 

Bramham, Jean , South Hill, Va. 

Brann, Ruth Abbey . Plainfield, N. J. 

Brauer, Anna Alfreda Richmond, Va. 

Brauer, Elsie Elisabeth . Richmond, Va. 

Brauer, Christine Rosenegk Richmond, Va. 

Braxton, Margaret E. . Washington, D. C. 

Breon, Wyoma Louisa . Newport News, Va. 

Brevoort, Dorothy M . . Elizabeth City, Va. 

Bridges, Julia Sublett . Norfolk, Va. 

Briesmaster, Leita Ann_ — . Crozier, Va. 

Briggs, Joan Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Bright, Beatrice Anne Cumberland, Md. 

Bright, Gloria Mignon . _W. Hartford, Conn. 

Brinegar, Virginia Sue Tazewell, Va. 

Brinsfield, June Hopkins Bel Air, Md. 

Bristow, Elsie Isabelle_ New Upton, Va. 

Brittain, Bcttie Ashby . —Portsmouth, Va. 

Britton, Audrey Raymond Richmond, Va. 

Broach, Hazel Frances . Index, Va. 

Brockenbrough, Louise Buena Vista, Va. 

Brooks, Caroline Osborne . „ Berea, Va. 

Brooks, Ileta Marian Martinsville, Va. 

Brooks, Marie Louise ._. Peekskill, N. Y. 

Brooks, Marion June . —Falmouth, Va. 

Brooks, Rosemary Hollister Washington, D. C. 

Brown, Doris Mae . Syracuse, N. Y. 

Brown, Dorothy Ann . River Forest, 111. 

Brown, Gloria Eleanor . Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Margaret Anne Petersburg, Va. 

Brown, Nancy Elizabeth Falls Church, Va. 

Brown, Phyllis Virginia Marion, Va. 

Brown, Susan Henrietta _ Athens, Ga. 

Brown, Thelma Ann . , Gloucester, Va. 

Brown, Verna Christine Oceana,' Va. 

Brown, Virginia Hannah Kansas City, Kans! 

Brown, Virginia Marie Stony Point, Va. 

Browning, Elizabeth Bruce Culpeper, Va. 

Browne, Jane Meade Haymarket, Va. 

Bruce, Alma Lee : Rice, Va. 

Bruch, Martha Christine . Bluefield, w! Va. 

Bruner, Ann Rawlings Titusville, Fla. 

Bruno, Josephine E. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bryant, Nora C Durham, N. C. 

Buchanan, Anne Blair „ Culpeper, Va. 

Buchanan, Patricia Richmond) Va! 

Buchanan, Marie Jane Richmond, Va. 

Buckham, Barbara Lee Oil City, Pa. 

Buczkowski, Adola D Belleville, Mich. 

Bullard, Margaret Frances Lynchburg, Va! 

Bullis, Elizabeth Ann Oceana, Va. 



164 Mary Washington College 

Bundy, Emily Frances Jamestown, N. C. 

Buonomo, Aida Victoria Caquas, Puerto Rico 

Burch, Dera Brown Petersburg, Va. 

Burch, Jean Elizabeth Alexandria, Va. 

Burchard, Prudence E Oxford, N. Y. 

Burdick, Thelma E Alfred Station, N. Y. 

Burke, Una Madeline Adams, Mass. 

Burkhardt, Jean Adelaide Holyoke, Mass. 

Burnette, Alice Kathleen Rustburg, Va. 

Burroughs, Emma Louise » Norfolk, Va. 

Burrows, Helyn Louise Westwood, N. J. 

Burton, Betty Jane Chincoteague, Va. 

Butler, Marian Elizabeth i Plainville, Conn. 

Byrd, Jacquelyn Margaret Bishop, Va. 

Cadwallader, Clarissa Woodard Winchester, Va. 

Cahoon, Nancy Anne Clifton Forge, Va. 

Caldwell, Rosemary Richmond, Va. 

Callaway, Alice - ,-Christie, Va. 

Cammer, Margaret Ann Winchester, Va. 

Campbell, Dorothy Mae Petersburg, Va. 

Campbell, Ellen Chisholm White Plains, N. Y. 

Campbell, Jean Doomann Alexandria, Va. 

Campbell, Louise M. _ Staunton, Va. 

Canada, Winifred Walker, Roanoke, Va. 

Cardwell, Jean Frances Richmond, Va. 

Carl, Jean Roselyn . Paulsboro, N. J. 

Carmines, Nell Moore Poquoson, Va. 

Carpenter, Elaine E. Norfolk, Va. 

Carpenter, Grace Virginia Winchester, Va. 

Carpenter, Hazel Larimer Brightwood, Va. 

Carpenter, Mildred Lee Waynesboro, Va. 

Carroll, Mary Ruth Petersburg, Va. 

Carter, Carol Covington, Va. 

Carter, Jean Mae Richmond, Va. 

Carter, Jean Morris Richmond, Va. 

Carter, Lolita Jean Bluefield, W. Va. 

Carter, Roberta Frances Richmond, Va. 

Carter, Sue Pierce The Plains, Va. 

Carwile, Louise Rustburg, Va. 

Cary, Betty Alice Clifton Forge, Va. 

Cassell, Mary Alice Bishop, Va. 

Cassell, Phyllis Ann Bishop, Va. 

Cassriel, Alice Louise 1 Evanston, 111. 

Castagna, Theodora Baltimore, Md. 

Castiglia, Rose Marie New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Cather, Jeanne E Winchester, Va. 

Caulk, Josephine Trappe, Md. 

Caum, Betty May Harrisburg, Pa. 

Cavedo, Ann Jacqueline Richmond, Va. 

Cebollero, Gladys Carmen ___Rio Pedras, Puerto Rico 

Challender, Anne Bell Hot Springs, Va. 

Chambers, Doris Mae Cloverdale, Va. 

Chandler, Margaret _ Maplewood, N. J. 

Chandler, Virginia Grace „._Kennett Square, Pa. 

Chapin, Margaret MineTree Petersburg, Va. 

Chapline, Kitty Cedon, Va. 

Chapman, Jeanne . Waynesboro, Va. 

Chapman, Mary P Smithfield, Va. 

Charshee, Nancy Lee Baltimore, Md. 

Chatto, Jessie Rebecca Wyoming, Del. 



Register of Students 165 



Cheatham, Mary Frances Appomattox, Va. 

Chesley, Jean Elizabeth : Fairfax, Va. 

Chesser, Betty Louvenia Roswell, N. M. 

Chilton, Mary Campbell Jeffersonton, Va. 

Chisholm, Barbara Lee Fairfax, Va. 

Chrisler, Lorraine Eleanor Auburn, N. Y. 

Chrisman, Ethel Rector Salem, Va. 

Chrisman, Hilda Mae Roanoke, Va. 

Chryssikos, Georgia Inez Bedford, Va. 

Cintron, Elsa Reyes Arecibo, Puerto Rico 

Cintron, Iris Reyes : Arecibo, Puerto Rico 

Cintron, Josefina Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Cissel, Joyce Dawn Washington, D. C. 

Ciuffreda, Diana New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Clagett, Evelyn Lucile : Stanley, Va. 

Clark, Alta Mae , Lynchburg, Va. 

Clark, Anna Maria : Mount Airy, N. C. 

Clark, Catherine E Alexandria, Va. 

Clark, Katherine K Arlington, Va. 

Clark, Margaret Louise Arlington, Va. 

Clarke, Joan Thomas Decatur, Ga. 

Clarke, Nellie Blanche Grafton, Va. 

Clatterbuck, Jane Marie Washington, D. C. 

Cleeland, Jane Agnes Elkins Park, Pa. 

Clements, Ann Gwendolyn Carson, Va. 

Clements, Helen Beatrice Saluda, Va. 

Cloe, Mary Wright Stafford, Va. 

Cloney, Rose Virginia Richmond, Va. 

Coggin, Marian Louise Spartanburg, S. C. 

Coke, Harriette Eloise Washington, D. C. 

Coldren, Mae Fern -Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Coldwell, Evelyn Jean Fairfax, Va. 

Cole, Helen Frances Richmond, Va. 

Cole, Jane Meade Chilhowie, Va. 

Coleman, Jean Martin Greenfield, Va. 

Coleman, Lois Kathleen Newport News, Va. 

Collins, Betty Jane , Forest City, N. C. 

Collins, Mary Olive Petersburg, Va. 

Colvin, Carolyn Carter Culpeper, Va. 

Colvin, Eleanor Hill Culpeper, Va. 

Compton, Carolyn Lee Rocky Mount, Va. 

Compton, Helen Trexler Salisbury, N. C. 

Comulada, Gloria Marie Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Conklin, Elizabeth Anne Winchester, Va. 

Conley, Jayne Gayle Radford, Va. 

Connelly, Dorothy Jean Trenton, N. J. 

Conover, Doris Frances South River, N. J. 

Conover, Mary Louise Verona, N. J. 

Conte, Gloria Vivian , Richmond, Va. 

Conway, Dorothy Frances Arlington, Va. 

Conybeare, Elizabeth Anne Lancaster, Pa. 

Cook, Elizabeth Carol Weehawken, N. J. 

Cooley, Nancy Lee Round Hill, Va. 

Cooper, Dawn Bessie Richmond, Va. 

Cooper, Ruth Allen Washington, D. C. 

Cooper, Virginia Howard Milner Phoenix, Md. 

Copley, Jane South Hill, Va. 

Corbett, Delphia Joyce Greenville, N. C. 

Cornwell, Jane Lindon Lancaster, Va. 

Cornwell, Louise Parks Lancaster, Va. 

Cotter, Marian Edna Manchester, Conn. 

Coughenour, Ann Salisbury, N. C. 



166 Mary Washington College 

Cowland, Marjorie Elaine Millbury, Mass. 

Cox, Auralia Galax, Va. 

Cox, Betty Anne Dryden, Va. 

Cox, Betty Belle . Morrisville, Pa. 

Cox, Elinor McClellan Norfolk, Va. 

Cox, Frances Vaughan Ashland, Va. 

Cox, Lillian Gordon Dahlgren, Va. 

Cox, Catharine F , Waynesboro, Va. 

Crane, Martha Ruth __Elizabeth, N. J. 

Crayton, Mildred E Clarksville, Tenn. 

Cr- nshaw, Thelma Grace Richmond, Va. 

Crews, Eva Ryan Culpeper, Va. 

Crickenberger, Margaret E Arlington, Va. 

Cross, Dorothy Jean Covington, Va. 

Crotty, Jean Ethel Worcester, Mass. 

Crouch, Janice Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Crowder, Virginia May Staunton, Va. 

Crowell, Frances Bilbie Charlotte, N. C. 

Crowell, Sallie Booker Abingdon, Va. 

Cunningham, Gertrude Elizabeth Buckroe Beach, Va. 

Curry, Mary Harrisburg, Pa. 

Curtice, Barbara Lucille Fairfax, Va. 

Curtis, Constance Hepburn Chester, Va. 

Curtis, Duane Eloise Chester, Va. 

Cushman, Elizabeth Newton Centre, Mass. 

Custis, Marguerite Craddockville, Va. 



Dale, Vivian Irene Portsmouth, Va. 

Dalton, Edythe Virginia Wightman, Va. 

Dameron, Marguerite Ida Haynesville, Va. 

Damewood, Dorothy E , Radford, Va. 

Daniel, Ann McCue Unionville, Va. 

Daniel, Elizabeth Edna Los Angeles, Cal. 

Daniel, Suzanne Deane St. Marys, W. Va. 

Darby, Nancy Clarke DeWitt, Va. 

D'Armond, Barbara June Harriman, Tenn. 

Darst, Mary Ellen Fredericksburg, Va. 

David, Evelyn Burker Mountclair N. J. 

Davidson, Mary Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Davidson, Mildred Jacqueline Bremo Bluff, Va. 

Davie, Edna Marjorie Petersburg, Va. 

Davis, Betty Christine Norfolk, Va. 

Davis, Carrie Elmyra , Ashland, Va. 

Davis, Doris Irene Batavia, N. Y. 

Davis, Harriet Jane Herndon, Va. 

Davis, Judith Lewis Arlington, Va. 

Davis, Lucy Alice Criglersville, Va. 

Davis, Thelma Viola . Branchville, Va. 

Dawes, Nellie Mosdell Worcester, Mass. 

Dawideit, Anne Ferndale, Mich. 

Dawley, Nancy Elizabeth Plainfield, N. J. 

Dawson, Doris Elizabeth Irvington, Va. 

Dean, Dorothy Anita Lakewood, Ohio 

DeLaney, Constance Dolores Rexford, N. Y. 

Delgado, Iris Carmen Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 

DeMedio, Conchita Marie „_ Bellemoor, Del. 

Denham, Alice Washington, D. C. 

Denny, Jean Virginia White Post, Va. 

D'nt, Margaret Mercedes Washington, D. C. 

Derigon, Phyllis Joan E. Hartford, Conn. 

Devers, Anita Jane Alexandria, Va. 



Register of Students 167 



Dewing, Marion Dutton Ridgewood, N. J. 

Dick, Norma Kathlyn , Worcester, Mass. 

Dickinson, Nancye Ruth Alexandria, Va. 

Diehl, Lilla Gerow Petersburg, Va. 

Diemmer, Emily Anne Brunswick, Ga. 

Dieter, Rose Mary Fredericksburg, Va. 

Divelbiss, Margaret Ellen Milford, Conn, 

Dixon, Dorothy Virginia Bluefield, W. Va. 

Dixon, Katherine Wilmington, N. C. 

Dixon, Mildred Elizabeth . Richmond, Va. 

Dobson, Elinor Mae Millsboro, Del. 

Dobson, Mary Kathleen Millsboro, Del. 

Doman, Irene Laraine Northampton, Mass. 

Dooley, Julia Jean Bedford, Va. 

Dooley, Mary Elizabeth Bedford, Va. 

Douglass, Nancy Pittman ; Memphis, Tenn. 

Douglass, Phyllis Schenectady, N. Y. 

Douros, Helen Norfolk, Va. 

Dowe, Marie Ellen Laurence, Mass. 

Downing, Emma Jeanne Ivor, Va. 

Doxsee, Eleanor Blair Freeport, N. Y. 

Drake, Dorothy Emma Fredericksburg, Va. 

Draper, Jeanne Clarksville, Tenn. 

Draz, Patricia Anne . Bronxville, N. Y. 

Drewry, Betty Moore , Boykins, Va. 

Drewry, Helen Joyce Beckley, W. Va. 

Driscoll, Anne Elizabeth Alexandria, Va. 

Drumheller, Dorothy Lee Waynesboro, Va. 

Drummond, Jean Frances Painter, Va. 

Drummond, Margaret Lee Accomack, Va. 

Dulaney, Mary Ellen Shenandoah, Va. 

Dunaway, Mary Sue_ Savannah, Ga. 

Duncan, Frances Muriel Leesburg, Fla. 

Dunkum, Glenna Faye Newport News, Va. 

Dunlap, Janet Adair Staunton, Va. 

Dunn, Ethel E Petersburg, Va. 

Dunn, Ethel Florence Baskerville, Va. 

Dunton, Peggy Lou White Stone, Va. 

Durden, Martha Evelyn Alexandria, Va. 

Durham, Alice Louise Beeville, Tex. 

Durham, Sarah Jane Richmond, Va. 

Dutch, Barbara Ann New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Dutcher, Florence Arlene Millersville, Pa. 

Duvall, Mary Charlotte . . Arlington, Va. 

Dyer, Ellen DeMott Danville, Va. 



Earhart, Eloise Shelley Blue Bell, Pa. 

Early, Dollie MadisOn Richmond, Va. 

East, Evelyn Virginia Arlington, Va. 

Edens, Retha Jean Ben Hur, Va. 

Edmonds, Jane Howard Painter, Va. 

Edwards, Betty Gale Guilford, N. C. 

Edwards, H. Kathleen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Edwards, Justine Rosena Gloucester, Va. 

Eelman, Marilyn Paterson, N. J. 

Egerton, Mary Elizabeth Fredericksburg, Va. 

Eisenhaure, Jean Dorris North Reading, Mass. 

Ellett, Louise Coding Lynchburg, Va. 

Ellington, Mayola Keysville, Va. 

Elliott, Anna Margaret Kittery, Me. 

Ellison, Frances Erlene , Portsmouth, Va. 



168 Mary Washington College 



Elsasser, Margaret Moss Portsmouth, Va. 

Elsden, Kathryn Mitz Westerfield, Mass. 

Emmons, Ann Elizabeth Boykins, Va. 

Emmons, Eva Lou Beckley, W. Va. 

Engstrom, Ingrid Lillian Huguenot, N. Y. 

Enroughty, Audrey Virginia Richmond, Va. 

Epsberg, Meta Helen Los Angeles, Cal. 

Ermida, Lydia Teresa Waterbury, Conn. 

Estes, Mabel Virginia Graves Mill, Va. 

Estes, Margaret Ann Chase City, Va. 

Estes, Virginia E Halifax, Va. 

Everett, Ann Eley Newsoms, Va. 

Everett, Jane Frances Emporia, Va. 

Ewalt, Rosalie Harrison Amherst, Va. 

Ewen, Jean Aubrey W. Hartford, Conn. 



Fadeley, Marian Elizabeth Washington, D. C. 

Faires, Dixie Lee Phoenix, Ariz. 

Falls, Margaret Fellows Farnham, Va. 

Fardette, Betty Jane Hilton Village, Va. 

Fardette, Peggy Frances Hilton Village, Va. 

Farnham, Helen Ann Springfield, Mass. 

Farshing, Margaret Ramsay , Salisbury, N. C. 

Fastabend, Catherine Louise . Petersburg, Va. 

Faucette, Sara Catherine-* Bristol, Tenn. 

Faulk, Carolyn Jean Mobile, Ala. 

Feaster, Helena Ann Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fellows, Margaret Marilyn Fitchburg, Mass. 

Fenner, Clara Ferebee Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Fenton, Barbara Mary North Andover, Mass. 

Ficklin, Frances Edith Ottoman, Va. 

Fierbaugh, Martha Beatrice Cleveland, Ohio 

Finkel, Judith L. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Finn, Jane Frances Northampton, Mass. 

Firsching, Grace Laura Jamaica, N. Y. 

Fisher, Dorothy Armstrong Warrenton, Va. 

Fitch, Doris Philadelphia, Pa. 

Fittin, Carol Janet Dunellen, N. J. 

Fitzgerald, Patricia Hamilton Fredericksburg, Va. 

Flanagan, Margaret Cecelia Portsmouth, Va. 

Fleischer, Betty Lou Rutherford, N. J. 

Fletcher, Gladys DeEtte Manassas, Va. 

Fletcher, Grace R Warrenton, Va. 

Fletcher, Marcia Holton , Charlottesville, Va. 

Floyd, Alice Evelyn Ithaca, N. Y. 

Floyd, Barbara Leigh Pugh Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Foley, Edith Coffey Richmond, Va. 

Foley, Helen Roberta Hamden, Conn. 

Ford, Carolyn Morton Church Road, Va. 

Forest, Rachael Clyde Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Fortmann, Anna Marie Oil City, Pa. 

Foster, Betty Jean Petersburg, Va. 

Fowler, Marie Antoinette Richmond, Va. 

Fowlkes, Ethel Lucy Pelham, N. C. 

Fox, Isobel Frances Warrenton, Va. 

Francis, Sylvia Iris Crewe, Va. 

Francisco, Sara Elizabeth Bristol, Tenn. 

Fravel, Mary Ann Maurertown, Va. 

Frazier, Margaret Elizabeth __Fredencksburg, Va. 

Freeman, Marilyn Washington, D. C. 

Freeman, Mary Louise Index, Va. 



Register of Students 169 



French, Doris May W. Springfield, Mass. 

French, Lois , Clintwood, Va. 

Friddell, Marian Lee Richmond, Va. 

Fristoe, Rebecca Ewan Bentonville, Va. 

Fry, Virginia May Pennington Gap, Va. 

Fulcher, Annie Dibrell Sandidges, Va. 

Fulk, Betty Ellen Charles Town, Va. 

Fulks, Edna Jean , Harriman, Tenn. 

Fuller, Florrye Carpenter Madison, Va. 

Fulton, Sarah Margaret Coalwood, W. Va. 

Fulton, Vivian Mae Richmond, Va. 

Fuss, Susan Victoria Columbus, Ga. 

Futrell, Virginia White Fredericksburg, Va. 



Gale, Edith Lane Rushmere, Va. 

Gallagher, Betty Joan Clifton Forge, Va. 

Gallimore, Bonnie Jeanne Pulaski, Va. 

Gammon, Doris Elizabeth Highland Springs, Va. 

Garcia, Nilda Aurora Utuado, Puerto Rico 

Gardner, Joella Portsmouth, Va. 

Garland. Katherine Virginia Warsaw, Va. 

Garland, Nannie Wiatt Village, Va. 

Garnett, Josie Maude Covington, Va. 

Garrison, Evelyn Louise Fredericksburg, Va. 

Gibbs, Addie Lee Criglersville, Va. 

Gibbs, Doris Ethelyn Arlington, Va. 

Gibson, Mattie Naomi Norton, Va. 

Gibson, Mildred Carrey Charlottesville, Va. 

Gibson, Neville Lawson Fredericksburg, Va. 

Gibson, Peggy Gene Charlottesville, Va. 

Giera, Yanina A W. Springfield, Mass. 

Gilbert, Gerry Marie Richmond, Va. 

Gill, Frances Anne Richmond, Va. 

Gill, Jean Vaughan Roanoke, Va. 

Gilmer, Ruth Blake Richmond, Va. 

Ginter, Alyce Ruth Chesterton, Ind. 

Glaser, Grace Virginia Charlotte, N. C. 

Glazier, Kathryn Anne Petersburg, Va. 

Glover, Claire Frances Paterson, N. J. 

Gochnauer, Betty Jane Lancaster, Pa. 

Godwin, Gladys Lavenia Windsor, Va. 

Goedde, Lorraine Emma Maplewood, N. J. 

Goff, Winifred Couch Charlotte, N. C. 

Goffigon, Margueritte Irene Cape Charles, Va. 

Gold, Maxine Leah Portsmouth, Va. 

Gomez, Isis M.__'_ New York, N. Y. 

Gonzalez, Ana Louisa C Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Good, Barbara Elizabeth White Plains, N. Y. 

Goode, Helen Joan Roanoke, Va. 

Goode, Shirley Lynchburg, Va. 

Goodloe. Anne Lee Chester, Va. 

Goodrich, Ellen Elizabeth Medford, Mass. 

Goodson, Billie Gene Newport News, Va.' 

Gormly, Mary Anna__ Jacksonville, Fla. 

Gould, Clara Marie Brunswick, Ga. 

Gouldin, Mary Moseley * Bagby, Va. 

Gound, Juliet McCorkle Glasgow, Va. 

Gowen, Frances Louise Sanford, Me. 

Graham, Hattie Bruce Christiansburg, Va. 

Grant, Betty Robey Warrenton, Va. 

Grant, Mildred Ray Emporia, Va. 



170 Mary Washington College 

Gratiot, Antoinette , Richmond, Va. 

Gratrix, Phyllis Shirley W. Hartford, Conn, 

Gray, Alva Jenks Roxbury, Va. 

Gray, Lois Ann Blacksburg, Va. 

Gray, Lula Purvis Robersonville, N. C. 

Gray, Mabel Virginia Winchester, Va. 

Graves, Etta Kate . Syria, Va. 

Green, Mary Celestine Fredericksburg, Va. 

Green, Mildred Virginia Amissville, Va. 

Gregg, Ann Nicholson Charlie Hope, Va. 

Grehan, Hannah Virginia Areola, Va. 

Griesar, Alice Standerwick Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Griffin, Annie Lorraine Jamesville, N. C. 

Griffin, Elizabeth Ashby Culpeper, Va. 

Griffin, Ruth Eileen Dahlgren, Va. 

Griffis, Edna Earle Midway, Va. 

Griffith, Virginia Ann , Richmond, Va. 

Grigg, Rebecca Cash Leesburg, Va. 

Griswold, Edith Jane Guilford, Conn. 

Grizzard, Angela Lee Emporia, Va. 

, Grizzard, Fanny Latane Drewryville, Va. 

Grosso, Viola Mae . Norfolk, Va. 

Grubbs, Mary Catherine Boyce, Va. 

Gunn, Alia Virginia Richmond, Va. 

Gurganus, Helen Marie Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Gustafson, Barbara Irene Hampton, Va. 

Guthrie, Florence Kent Guinae Mills, Va. 



Hafner, Carol Mona Glen Ellyn, 111. 

Hagerty, Irma Louise Kennett Square, Pa. 

Haines, Audrey Taylor Catskill, N. Y. 

Haines, Elsie Jayne Windsor, Vt. 

Hair, Margaret Louise Harrisburg, Pa. 

Haley, Anne Shirlee ! Newport News, Va. 

Haley, Jene Glenna Newport News, Va. 

Halfacre, Betty Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Hall, Colleen Haley Pulaski, Va. 

Hall, Elizabeth Mae Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hall, Hazel Mae Roanoke, Va. 

Hall, Helen Rebecca Norton, Va. 

Hamilton, Norma Lucille , Roanoke, Va. 

Hannah, Shirley Elaine Vienna, Va. 

Hansen, Barbara Helen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Haraway, Louise Archer Richmond, Va. 

Hardaway, Jean Rebecca Stony Creek, Va. 

Harding, Carolyn Benna : Richmond, Va. 

Harding, Marion Carey Lilian, Va. 

Hare, Evelyn Virginia Rutherford, N. J. 

Harmon, Muriel Newberry, S. C. 

Harper, Jean Elizabeth . — : ___Warrenton, Va. 

Harrell, Carrie Louise Adams Grove, Va. 

Harrell, Frances Leone Emporia, Va. 

Harrell, Margaret Ruth Fountain, N. C. 

Harris, Anne Meade Norfolk, Va. 

Harris, Anne Overton , Orange, Va. 

Harris, Dorothy Mae Drewryville, Va. 

Harris, Edna Andrews Lignum, Va. 

Harris, Lunette Phillips Blackstone, Va. 

Harrison, Elizabeth Strother Croom, Md. 

Harrison, Jeannette Nutley, N. J. 

Harrison, Marian Jenifer Danville, Va. 



Register of Students 171 

Harrison, Marie Roma Charlotte, N. C. 

Harrison, Virginia Kathleen Meadowview, Va. 

Harwood, Mary Margaret Pittsfield, Mass. 

Hatch, Marjorie Julia Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hathorn, Lois Janis Norfolk, Va. 

Haven, Claudine Elizabeth Blackstone, Va. 

Hawkins, Helen Smith Lynchburg, Va. 

Hawkins, Louise Blanche Brock Road, Va. 

Hawkins, Louise Miles Ford, Va. 

Hawley, Pearl Halcyon W. Hartford, Conn. 

Hawn, Bethany Annette Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Hayden, Betty Jane ^Centerville, Md. 

Hazlett, Jeanne Lucille Dalton, Pa. 

Heffernan, Nancy Duane Fredericksburg, Va. 

Heflin, Violet Angaleene , Catlett, Va. 

Henderson, Barbara Ann , Clover, Va. 

Hendrie, Betty Ann Winchester, Va. 

Hendley, Elizabeth Y Marshall, Va. 

Henshaw, Frances S Madison, Va. 

Hepler, Jane Luella New Bethlehem, Pa. 

Hepler, Mary Ellen Covington, Va. 

Heritage, Elaine Frances Thorofare, N. J. 

Hernandez, Maria deLourdes Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Herthel, Helen Louise „ Richmond, Va. 

Herz, Cornelia . Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Heverly, Mary Louise Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Hickerson, Martha Sue . Richmond, Va. 

Hickman, Barbara Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hicks, Marilee Clarke Charlotte, N. C. 

Hiers, Dorothy Louise . Smithfield, Va. 

Highsmith, Eleanor Mayo Wilmington, N. C. 

Hildebrand, Katherine Louise Alfred, N. Y. 

Hill, Kathryn Beale Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hill, Margaret Joy Alexander, Va. 

Hill, Peggy Jane Big Stone Gap, Va. 

Hilldrup, Betsy Gordon Chancellor, Va. 

Hilldrup, Joyce Herndon Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hines, Mary Laura Suffolk, Va. 

Hinnant, Doris Fay Micro, N. C. 

Hite, Nancy Mann Blackstone, Va. 

Hockenberry, Jane Elizabeth Madison, N. J. 

Hoffman, Peggy Lou Danville, Va. 

Hoffman, Shirley Anne , St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Hoggard, Susan Coke Norfolk, Va. 

Holland, Mary Garland Bedford, Va. 

Holliday, Dorothy Virginia Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hollingsworth, Vera Patricia Woodstock, Va. 

Holloway, Martha Evelyn Yorktown, Va. 

Holman, Katheryn Agnes Alexandria, Va. 

Holman, Kathryn Wanamaker Lynchburg, Va. 

Holmes, Jacquelin Lee St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Holt, Nancy Dell . Wakefield, Va. 

Holton, Henrietta McKenney Centreville, Md. 

Holzhauer, Alice K Richmond, Va. 

Homar, Laura Virginia Stephenson, Va. 

Honaker, Edith D Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hood, Dorothy Nethers Hood, Va. 

Hood, Mary Jarelle Hood, Va. 

Hopkins, Jean Grey *. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hoppenrath, Janis Lou Yorktown, Va. 

Hoppenrath, Joyce Ann , Yorktown, Va. 

Horth, Inez Marie Pittsfield, Mass. 



172 Mary Washington College 



Horton, Jean Marie Jonesville, Va. 

Horton, Martha Elaine Richmond, Va. 

Horton, Phyllis Edward Richlands, Va. 

Horton, Gloria Belle Suffolk, Va. 

Houchens, Harriet Alberta Sandston, Va. 

Hough, Barbara Ann W. Hartford, Conn. 

Howard, Nancy Jane Portsmouth, Va. 

Howell, Mary Louise , New Glasgow, Va. 

Howlett, Willnet Petersburg, Va. 

Hubbard, Mildred Lucille Stedman, N. C. 

Huddle, Mary Emily Wytheville, Va. 

Hudgins, Rosalyn Brownley Port Haywood, Va. 

Hudson, Barbara Carol Lynchburg, Va. 

Hudson, Ida May Culpeper, Va. 

Hudson, Jean Dinges T Culpeper, Va. 

Hughes, Claire Elizabeth New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Hughes, Martha Lorraine Fredericksburg, Va. 

Hulvey, Margaret Rogers , Mt. Crawford, Va. 

Hunter, Eleanor Mary Rutherford, N. J. 

Hunter, Elizabeth Ina Framingham, Mass. 

Hurlburt, Jane Alcott Waterbury, Conn. 

Hurley, Ruth Ann Macon, Ga. 

Hurst, Margaret Jean , Woodleaf, N. C. 

Hutchinson, Betty Ann : Walkerton, Va. 

Hutchinson, Martha Jane Needham, Mass. 

Hutchinson, Virginia Mae Metuchen, N. J. 



Inskeep, Hilda Lee Culpeper, Va. 

Irby, Catherine Hudgens Camp Sibert, Ala. 



Jackson, Mary Jane Wildwood, N. J. 

James, Kate Mapp Franktown, Va. 

Janes, Mary Alice Columbus, Ga. 

Janski, Marian Rose Emporia, Va. 

Jarvis, Mary Margaret Norfolk, Va. 

Jennings, Betty Ann Roanoke, Va. 

Jesse, Beulah Mae Jewell Ridge, Va. 

Jett, Mary Catherine Rehoboth Church, Va. 

Johnson, Anne Biscoe __Hampton, Va. 

Johnson, Carolyn Louise Hampton, Va. 

Johnson, Eveline Jennelle Lynchburg, Va. 

Johnson, Florence Anne Roswell, N. Mex. 

Johnson, Harriet Hall Fordwick, Va. 

Johnson, Marjorie Anne Roanoke, Va. 

Johnson, Mary Elizabeth r Herndon, Va. 

Johnson, Mildred Matthews Kennett Square, Pa. 

Johnson, Priscilla J Mountain Home, Tenn. 

Johnson, Ruth Vivian New Britain, Conn. 

Johnson, Shirley Elizabeth Newfield, N. J. 

Johnston, Ann Elizabeth Marshall, Va. 

Jolly, Gloria Petersburg, Va. 

Jolly, Maxine Gould Petersburg, Va. 

Jones, Anna Ruth Jonesville, Va. 

Jones, Betty Jane Arlington, Va. 

Jones, Carolyn LeCato Newport News, Va. 

Jones, Doris Eleanor Fredericksburg, Va. 

Jones, Elizabeth Louise Rutherford, N. J. 

Jones, Gladys Burt Warrenton, Va. 

Jones, Jacquelyn Forest City, N. C. 

Jones, Jeane Hartwell Richmond, Va. 



Register of Students 173 

Jones, Katherine Elizabeth Smyrna, Del. 

Jones, Meade Randolph Staunton, Va. 

Jones, Nancy Shumate Ashland, Va. 

Jones, Ruby K. Wine Culpeper, Va. 

Jones, Sally Howe Winchester, Va. 

Jordan, Blair Runnymede Place, D. C. 

Jordan, Jane Louise Altoona, Pa. 

Jouard, Elaine Louise Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Judatz, Harriet Louise Hartford, Conn. 

Judy, Betty Jo McDonald Fredericksburg, Va. 

Kauffman, Nancy Bruce Petersburg, Va. 

Kay, Marianne . , Berea, Va. 

Keefer, Janet Faith Ashbury Park, N. J. 

Keelen, Providencia J. Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 

Keeler, Annette von Roy : Bedford, Va. 

•N^Ceener, Jean Elizabeth __^____Lampeter, Pa. 

*Keith, Bettie Jean Randolph, N. Y. 

.-*#£eister, Emmy Jean Tazewell, Va. 

-— • Kellam, Jane Elizabeth Petersburg, Va. 

.^Keller, Barbara Mi. Vernon, N. Y. 

"""Kelly, Dorothy Marie New Monmouth, N. J. 

—Kelly, Minnie Elizabeth Madison, Va. 

-•Kemp, Virginia Bruyere Arlington, Va. 

_. — Kendrick, Patricia Ann Washington, D. C. 

— ^Keppler, Gloria Josephine Brooklyn, N. Y. 

-—Kern, Natalie Wayland Goshen, Va. 

— »Kerr, Sarah Virginia N. Holston, Va. 

-— Kessler, Elizabeth D Orange, Va. 

-Kidd, Annie Kirk Lexington, Va. 

— Kilduff, Elsie Reed Burgess Store, Va. 

_- Kimman, Mary Anne Fredericksburg, Va. 

—•King, Lillian Hall Tangier, Va. 

——King, Marianne Ruth Norfolk, Va. 

~>King, Norma Jean — _ Phoenix, Ariz. 

^Kinsey, Katherine Lila Petersburg, Va. 

— Kinsworthy, Elizabeth G. Syracuse, N. Y. 

-Kipps, Annie Elizabeth Aroda, Va. 

— Kirby, Jean Isabel Richmond, Va. 

— Kirkwood, Ruth Wilson Sterling, Va. 

-Kite, Mary Elizabeth Elkton, Va. 

Klein, Betty Irene Frederick, Md. 

-Klein, June Natalie Frederick, Md. 

-JClenck, Dorothy Plainfield, N. J. 

— Knight, Katherine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

——Knott, Jean Marie Richmond, Va. 

-Knox, Anne Shirley , Richmond, Va. 

- —Koeller, Beverley Lou Ridgefield Park, N. J. 

— Korbel, Mary Catherine Alexandria, Va. 

-Korth, Lura Marcelle Hutchens Woodford, Va. 

—Kostritsky, Margaret Long Portsmouth, Va. 

.Krammer, Gertrude Marie Newark, N. J. 

-Kratochvil, June Helena _* Easthampton, Mass. 

Krebbs, Elizabeth B Lynchburg, Va. 

-Krug, Jean Taylor Richmond, Va. 

Kulp, Virginia Rebecca Richmond, Va. 

'- Kyle, Ellen Catherine Richmond, Va. 

Lambert, Barbara Washington, D. C. 

^Lamberth, Mary Virginia White Marsh, Va. 

-Lamberth, Mildred Watson White Marsh, Va. 

Landgren, Evelyn Virginia Hamden, Conn. 



174 Mary Washington College 

Landry, Dorothy Behrens Fredericksburg, Va. 

Lane, Dorothy Lee JLondon Bridge, Va. 

-Lane, Rose Ellen Princess Anne, Va. 

Lane, Sue Ellen Gay . Fredericksburg, Va. 

*- Langille, Margaret Sarah Waltham, Mass. 

__Xanham, Doris Naomi Alexandria, Va. 

-Larrick, Isabelle Virginia - Winchester, Va. 

— Lauer, Lillian Hannan . Bridgeton, N. J. 

Laurance, Jean Anne Brooklyn, N. Y. 

__JLaw, Elizabeth Janes Vienna, Va. 

Lawless, Ruth Anne Hampton, Va. 

_ Lawson, Anne Pauline New Kensington, Pa. 

Lawson, Geraldine N ! Delray Beach, Fla. 

. Lawton, Betty Louise Riverdale, Md. 

_.Xeary, Nancy Ann Arlington, Va. 

Xeazer, Elizabeth Nell _, , Remington, Va. 

LeCompte, Isabel Mason Richmond, Va. 

Leddy, Marie Louise Edgewood, Md. 

—Lee, Anne Washington Scott's Hill, N. C. 

-ice, Carol Holcombe Front Royal, Va. 

•-Xee, Lucy s . Pulaski, Tenn. 

-Xee, Margaret Carpenter The Plains, Va. 

— Leeuwenburg, Barbara Elizabeth Wilmington, N. C. 

^XeFrancois, Claire Teresa Montreal, Canada 

^Lenoir, Frances Catherine Cordele, Ga. 

Lerch, Margaret Isabel White Plains, N. Y. 

-Lescure, Dorothy Mae Hopewell, Va. 

j, Levi, Edith Gray Berryville, Va. 

-Lewis, Gloria Grace Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

, Lewis, Helen Peyton Fredericksburg, Va. 

"Lewis, Mary Caudill Remington, Va. 

Tsewis, Virginia Elizabeth Culpeper, Va. 

Liilly, Louise Jacqueline Suffolk, Va. 

Lindenberger, Mary Jane Camp Hill, Pa. 

-Xindeman, Jean Catherine Washington, D. C. 

— tindsey, Wilma Lucille Sylvatus, Va. 

Eindstrom, Gwenivere Richmond, Va. 

^Eindstrom, Nancie Ellen Baltimore, Md. 

*-Lingan, Penelope Ettrick, Va. 

„Link, Gurdine Marie Danville, Va. 

'C-Lippold, Doris Kathryn Washington, D. C. 

_, iipscomb, Frances Mildred Beulahville, Va. 

Lktman, Jane Donaldson Oakland, Md. 

Llewellyn, Beverly Amalie Norfolk, Va. 

*-£loyd, Doris Page i Richmond, Va. 

-iohoefer, Beverly Jane Takoma Park, Md. 

Lohr, Dewey Linwood Radiant, Va. 

,-Lombardi, Lucy Ann Barrington, R. I. 

,^-Lonas, Dorothea Augusta, Ga. 

Jtsong, Nellie Varn Petersburg, Va. 

-Longaker, Barbara Ann Arlington, Va. 

Loving, Ellen Virginia Washington, D. C. 

Lowry, Alta Foster Richmond, Va. 

Lowry, Ellene Grey Covington, Va. 

Luraschi, Lorraine Anne New Rochelle, N. Y. 

..Xyliston, Betty Jane Newport News, Va. 

Lynch, Alice Hewett Davisville, Pa. 

Lynch, Emily Fenimore Davisville, Pa. 

McAllister, Elizabeth Degge Dinwiddie, Va. 

McBride, Ravis Arline Suffolk, Va. 



Register of Students 175 

McCabe, Dorris Virginia Norfolk, Va. 

McCann, Ellen French , Franklin, Va. 

MeCarty, Edith M ,. Delaplane, Va. 

McCaskie, Christine Louise , New Bedford, Mass. 

McCausland, Jean . Lynchburg, Va. 

McClarin, Jean Lenore Norfolk, Va. 

McConnell, Jean Bradley Abingdon, Va. 

McCullough, Doris Jean .Elmira Heights, N. Y. 

McCullough, Jane Hodgson Alexandria, Va. 

McDaniel, Hazel Warren Jeffersonton, Va. 

McDonald, Virginia Carolyn Goshen, Va. 

McDonough, Gloria Marie Round Hill, Va. 

McDowell, Avery Elizabeth , Vernon Hill, Va. 

McElnea, Marilyn Ruth-. South Orange, N. J. 

McElory, Margaret Petersburg, Va. 

McGlothlin, Helen Virginia Richlands, Va. 

McGrath, Evelyn Catherine Holyoke, Mass. 

Mcintosh, Carolyn West Hartford, Conn. 

McKeever, Jeannette Braithwaite Cross Junction, Va. 

McLeod, Margarette Ann Norfolk, Va. 

McMenamin, Dorothy Lelia Hampton, Va. 

McNulty, Virginia Rose Waterbury, Conn. 

McTeer, Betty Louise Moncks Corner, S. C. 

McVeigh, Nellie Mabel Stevensburg, Va. 

Macan, Eileen Robinson . Rutherford, N. J. 

Macheras, Lillie Lexington, Va. 

MacLeay, Muriel Arleen , New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Maguire, Patricia Arlene Methuen, Mass. 

Mahan, Mary Jo Taunton, Mass. 

Mahoney, Dorothy F. Dover Point, N. H. 

Malloy, Helen Anna Devon, Pa. 

Malone, Mary Stuart _ Beckley, W. Va. 

Manning, Anne Jane , Arlington, Va. 

Marcus, Anita Brookline, Mass. 

Marsh, Lelia Jett , Reedville, Va. 

Marsh, Peggy Lou T. Hagerstown, Md. 

Marshall, Anne Clarke Hilton Village, Va. 

Marshall, Isabelle B. Cohasset, Va. 

Marshall, Jane Elizabeth Falls Church, Va. 

Marshall, Marguerite Irene Jersey, Va. 

Marshall, Rosalind Ruby Hampton, Va. 

Martell, Norma Elaine Sutton, Mass. 

Martin, Anne Perkinson Petersburg, Va. 

Martin, Dorothy Louise West Point, Va. 

Martin, Uldine Moncks Corner, S. C. 

Marvin, Dorothy Anne White Plains, N. Y. 

Mason, Florence Marie Syracuse, N. Y. 

Massie, Anne Arrington Roanoke, Va. 

Mathewson, Patricia Jane . New Britain, Conn. 

Matthews, Susan Eve Middletown, N. J. 

Matthieu, Mary Adele Portsmouth, Va. 

Matzek, Barbara Ruth Westfield, Mass. 

Matzenger, Edith Nan Mobile, Ala. 

Maury, Kathryn Jane . Mobile, Ala. 

May, Mildred Ruth Occoquan, Va. 

May, Suzanne Agnes : Boston, Mass. 

Mayer, Margaret Jane , Olean, N. J. 

Mayers, Martha Anne Charlottesville, Va. 

Meade, Betty Jean Grundy, Va. 

Menshing, Janet Westfield, N. J. 

Mercer, Dorothy Jeanette McClellanville, S. C. 

Merchant, Rosalie P Marshall, Va. 



176 Mary Washington College 

Messersmith, Marian Rose Salem, Ohio 

Meyer, Ruth Phyllis ,. Worcester, Mass. 

Middleton, Mildred Elaine Chase City, Va. 

Middleton, Tilly Wilkison The Plains, Va. 

Midtskang, Jeanne Audrey Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Millar, Mary Elizabeth Hilton Village, Va. 

Millard, Nell Flint Culpeper, Va. 

Miller, Amy Lee . , Bealeton, Va. 

Miller, Ann . Front Royal, Va. 

Miller, Ann Marie ! Martinsville, Va. 

Miller, Christy Lou Richmond, Va. 

Miller, Eleanor Frances Harrisburg, Pa. 

Miller, Helen Virginia Washington, D. C. 

Miller, Louise Elizabeth Hammonton, N. J. 

Miller, Mary Ann Clinton, Md. 

Miller, Mary Sue Coalwood, W. Va. 

Miller, Virginia Lee Portsmouth, Va. 

Millner, Mary Norvell Danville, Va. 

Mills, Adeline Helen-Bourguin Stone Harbor, N. J. 

Mills, Frances June Alexandria, Va. 

Mingin, Doris Ellen Medford, N. J. 

Minnerly, June Ellen Johnson City, N. Y. 

Minor, Ann Wayne Richmond, Va. 

Missimer, Susan Maddaford Erie, Pa. 

Mitchell, Lucinda Mary Culpeper, Va. 

Mock, Thelma Lorraine Hamilton, Va. 

Moore, Betty Wytheville, Va. 

Moore, Catherine H Springfield, 111. 

Moore, Dorothy Valdosta, Ga. 

Moore, Gladys Irene Emporia, Va. 

Moore, Jeanne Roanoke, Va. 

Moore, Margaret Katherine Miramar, Puerto Rico 

Moore, Mary John : Lynchburg, Va. 

Moraio, Anita Marie Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Moraza, Margarita Viera San Mateo, Puerto Rico 

Morris, Martha Jeraldine m Stanardsville, Va. 

Morris, Tabitha Verbena . Alexandria, Va. 

Morrison, Carolyn Jean Wilmington, Del. 

Morrissey, Helen Cecelia Richmond, Va. 

Morton, Louise Dudley Norfolk, Va. 

^Nfoss, Emma Millan Petersburg, Va. 

""ftloss, Josephine Compton Chase City, Va. 

Moss, Margaret Canfield Key West, Fla. 

Mould, Mary Elizabeth Williamsville, N. Y. 

Muller, Frances Isabelle Newport News, Va. 

Mulrooney, Anita Agnes Wilmington, Del. 

Murden, Imogen Suffolk, Va. 

Murray, Adrienne I Watertown, Mass. 

Murray, Alice Brightwell Norfolk, Va. 

Murray, Marjorie Burwell Cumberstone, Md. 

Muth, Bette Jean Allentown, Pa. 

Myers, Dorothy Ann Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Myrick, Ruth Anne Suffolk, Va. 

Nash, Beverly Jean Pelham, N. Y. 

Nash, Ester Mae : __Lerty, Va. 

Neal, Caroline Elizabeth Alexandria, Va. 

Neal, Mary Jim Norfolk, Va. 

Neels, Amy Ruth Kent, Conn. 

Neff, Barbara Ruth Briarcliff Manor, N. Y. 

Neil, Madeline Rae , Allentown, Pa. 



Register of Students 177 



Nelson, Dana Virginia Winchester, Va. 

Newbill, Frances Christian Center Cross, Va. 

Newell, Marion Roberts W. Hartford, Conn. 

Newlon, Howard Hampton Brandy, Va. 

Newsome, Gloria Sing Norfolk, Va. 

Niceley, Virginia Woody Lexington, Va. 

Nichols, Willie Lee__ Bedford, Va. 

Nixon, Evelyn Williams Winchester, Va. 

Noble, Katherine Saunders Caret, Va. 

Norford, Patricia Vale Charlottesville, Va. 

Norris, Melanie Louise Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nuckols, Mary Leber 1 , Sabot, Va. 

Nussey, Patricia Margaret Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Nylen, Joyce Lee Fairfield, Conn. 



Odin, Nancy Lou W. Hartford, Conn. 

O'Gorman, Paula Teresa E. Hartford, Conn. 

Olgers, Marion Grace Sutherland, Va. 

Oliver, Phyllis June Albion, Mont. 

Olson, Arlene Helen Freeport, N. Y. 

Olson, Gloria Janet Portsmouth, Va. 

O'Neil, Dorothy Mary Takoma Park, Md. 

O'Neil, Rosemary Ellen Binghamton, N. Y. 

Onley, Betty Jane Camp Lejeune, N. C» 

Oquist, Virginia Creveling Elmwood, Conn. 

O'Rourke, Mary Rita New Bedford, Mass. 

Ortiz, Haydee Celeste . Aibonito, Puerto Rico 

Osbourn, Helen Wyatt Washington, D. C. 

Osinski, Wanda Evelyn Westfield, Mass. 

Otey, Peggy Ann . Richmond, Va. 

Overman, Betty Carlton Hilton Village, Va. 

Overman, Meda Leigh Portsmouth, Va. 

Oxenham, Anne Winston Richmond, Va. 



Packard, Jocelyn May Arlington, Va. 

Padgett, Anne Jeannette Big Island, Va. 

Page, Ethlan Mae Edgebill, Va. 

Page, Eva Louise Burgaw, N. C. 

Palatine, Irene Mary Waterbury, Conn. 

Palmer, Catherine Marston Culpeper, Va. 

Palmer, Jane Snow Sharon, Mass. 

Pancoast, Margaret Alice Purcellville, Va. 

Pappandrou, Helen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Pardo, Rosalia Mayaquez, Puerto Rico 

Parker, Beverly Jean Charlotte, N. C. 

Parker, Kate Louise Portsmouth, Va. 

Parker, Naomi Edwina Corbin, Ky. 

Parks, Hilah Lee " Petersburg, Va. 

Parks, Hilda deForrest Arlington, Va. 

Parks, Ruth Strickland Tangier, Va. 

Parlo, Josephine Anne Waterbury, Conn. 

Parsley, Ann Meredith . Richmond, Va. 

Parsley, Jeanne Marie Washington, D. C. 

Parsons, Jean Evelyn. , York Village, Me. 

Partlow, Hattie Mae Marshall, Va. 

Pates, Nancy Julia Fredericksburg, Va. 

Patterson, Annie Louise Esmont, Va. 

Patterson, Maxine Lucille Stafford, Va. 

Patteson, Betty Jo Richlands, Va. 

Pattie, Frances Morton Madison, Va. 



178 Mary Washington College 



Paul, Ann Norfolk, Va. 

Payne, Beverley Mason Cherry Point, N. C. 

Pearsall, Jean Louise Hampton, Va. 

Pearson, Cleo K Marshall, Va. 

Pearson, Frances Elizabeth Lawrenceville, Va. 

Peer, Evelyn Hisey Woodstock, Va. 

Peery, Margaret Isabella., Richmond, Va. 

Peery, Phyllis Hope Pocahontas, Va. 

Pellinen, Hilma Lydia New York, N. Y. 

Pemberton, Edith Temple Gloucester, Va. 

Pemberton, Phyllis Jane Richmond, Va. 

Penn, Nancy Virginia Quantico, Va. 

Penn, Virginia Lee Suffolk, Va. 

Perez, Rosa Camelia Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Perkins, Betty Alma Nutley, N. J. 

Perkins, Mildred Aileen Virgilina, Va. 

Perrin, Patricia Catherine Syracuse, N. Y. 

Perry, Janice Ruth Louisburg, N. C. 

Perishing, Marjorie Dean Fredericksburg, Va. 

Peters, Martha Syracuse, N. Y. 

Peters, Marie Cox Catlett, Va. 

Peterson, Dorothy May B Washington, D. C. 

Pettitt, Evelyn Shore Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Peyton, Kathryn Tignall Fredericksburg, Va. 

Philhower, Sarah Emory Nutley, N. J. 

Phillips, Mary Atwell Montclair, N. J. 

Phillips, Ruth Joyce Petersburg, Va. 

Phipps, Ruth Patterson Waynesboro, Va. 

Phipps, Stella Kathryn Fox, Va. 

Pickeral, Fanelle Christie Manassas, Va. 

Pickett, Billie Joyce Newport News, Va. 

Pilcher, Ethel Petersburg, Va. 

Pinchbeck, Virginia Eloise Richmond, Va. 

Pitman, Marguerite Grace Kilmarnock, Va. 

Plante, Phyllis Madelyn Worcester, Mass. 

Plante, Rachel Louise Grasmere, N. H. 

Plastridge, Elsie Jeanne Delray Beach, Fla. 

Plummer, Lillias Ann , Petersburg, Va. 

Poehlmann, Nancy Lee Warrenton, Va. 

Pollard, Claire Anne Methuen, Mass. 

Pollard, Gladys Duncan Petersburg, Va. 

Pollard, Jacquelynn Mary Methuen, Mass. 

Pope, H. Louise Portsmouth, Va. 

Porter, Mary Louisa Key West, Fla. 

Porter, Priscilla Elaine N. Bennington, Vt. 

Posey, Doris * Falmouth, Va. 

Post, Gloria Mae , Kingston, N. Y. 

Poteat, Bertha Wildrick Warwick, N. Y. 

Potee, Helen Marguerite Richmond, Va. 

Poteet, Mary Alice Appalachia, Va. 

Potts, Betty Joan Belleville, Mich. 

Potts, Dorothy Elizabeth Kennett Square, Pa. 

Powell, Agnes Allen McKenney, Va. 

Powell, Donna Anders Onancock, Vi. 

Powel, Dorothy Stafford Wilmington, Del. 

Powell, Mary Martin Fredericksburg, Va. 

Powell, Laverne Norfolk, Va. 

Powers, Dolores Esther Goshen, N. Y. 

Prange, Alice Beale Franklin, Va. 

Preddy, Bessie Isabel Proffit, Va. 

Probst, Marilyn Clifford New Orleans, La. 

Proctor, Betty Lee Blacksburg, Va. 



Register of Students 179 



Pruitt, Marguerite Tangier, Va. 

Pruitt, Mary Rose Oxford, N. C. 

Purcell, Joann Elizabeth , Syracuse, N. Y. 

Purdie, Shirley Anne Glen Allen, Va. 

Purdy, Barbara Louise Washington, D. C. 

Purviance, Jean Boykins, Va. 

Putnam, Ester Winston, Va. 

Putney, M. Eleanor Farmville, Va. 

Quillan, Jacquelyn Virginia Alexandria, Va. 

Quillen, Tenneva Gene Slant, Va. 

Radolinski, Alice Helen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Radolinski, Marie Evelyn Fredericksburg, Va. 

Ramey, Betty Jane Woodstock, Va. 

Randall, Annie Louise Lyons, Ga. 

Randall, Beryl Alison Stoughton, Mass. 

Ransom, Martha Jean Arlington, Va. 

Rasmussen, Helen Frances Florence, S. C. 

Ratcliffe, Agnes Kathleen Richmond, Va. 

Raymunt, Julia Margaret ; Washington, Conn. 

Reamy, Evelyn June Arlington, Va. 

Reamy, Rebecca Anne Edwardsville, Va. 

Reed, Jane Althea Wilmington, Del. 

Reed, Mildred McCorkell Seaview, Va. 

Reed, Shirley Ann Norfolk, Va. 

Renner, Bessie Thornton , Winchester, Va. 

Repass, Roberta Kent Richmond, Va. 

Revel, Catherine Brislan Charleston, S. C. 

Rey, Amy Louise Maspeth, N. Y. 

Reyes, Cecilia , New York, N. Y. 

Reynolds, Kathie Grason University, Va. 

Reynolds, May Hollingsworth Charlottesville, Va. 

Ribet, Emily Catherine Valdese, N. C. 

Ricamore, Beatryce Elizabeth Hampton, Va. 

Rice, Elizabeth Millbury, Mass. 

Richardson, Laulie Friedlin Norfolk, Va. 

Richardson, Mary Pamelia_i , Falls Village, Conn. 

Richart, Jane Eleanor Roswell, N. M. 

Rickards, Alice Stoddard Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Riddle, Barbara Miller Weldon, N. C. 

Riddle, Mary Anne Norfolk, Va. 

Riggs, Miriam Folger Richmond, Va. 

Ritchey, Helen Patricia Long Beach, Cal. 

Ritchey, Olivine Anna Long Beach, Cal. 

Ritterson, Anna Louise Wilmington, Del. 

Rivera, Matilde Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 

Rivery, Maria Raquel Havana, Cuba 

Rixey, Louise Helen Tyler Quantico, Va. 

Robbins, Alice Aileen Hampton, Va. 

Roberge, Annette Marion Meriden, Conn. 

Roberts, Annie Mae Roanoke, Va. 

Roberts, Elizabeth Janet Philadelphia, Pa. 

Roberts, Eloise Cox Oldtown, Va. 

Roberts, Margaret Gene Nassawadox, Va. 

Robertson, Mary Elizabeth Callaway, Va. 

Robertson, Mary Eppes Marshall, Va. 

Robertson, Nancy Eleanor Syracuse, N. Y. 

Robertson, Nancy Ruth Callaway, Va. 

Robertson, Virginia E Danville, Va. 



180 Mary Washington College 



Robinson, Evelyn Lorraine Sterling, Mass. 

Robinson, Mark M Petersburg, Va. 

Robinson, Ora Elena Glade Spring, Va. 

Roblin, Jane Edith Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rodriquez, Carmen Ana Arecibo, Puerto Rico 

Rodriquez, Marie Cristina Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Roe, Eleanor Jean Northampton, Mass. 

Rogerson, Lois Johnson Robersonville, N. C. 

Rohr, Carolyn Elizabeth Manassas, Va. 

Rosenthal, Joan Phillips Branford, Conn. 

Ross, Alice Yates Charlotte, N. C. 

Ross, Anne Claire Richmond, Va. 

Ross, Charlotte Nickerson New Castle, Del. 

Ross, Lily Ann Ferrum, Va. 

Ross, Mary Ann Broad Run, Va. 

Ross, Mary Gastineau Culpeper, Va. 

Routzahn, Lea June Middletown, Md. 

Rowe, Audrey Hearl Norfolk, Va. 

Rowe, Dorothy Towles Fredericksburg, Va. 

Rowlett, Gene Ellington Richmond, Va. 

Royar, Mabel Levering S. Arlington, Va. 

Rudd, Barbara Glenn Pleasant Garden, N. C. 

Rudman, Jacqueline Lois , . Newton, Mass. 

Ruis, Carmen Irene Amengual Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Russell, Adelia Ann Concord, Tenn. 

Russell, Barbara Ann E. Smithfield, Pa. 

Russell, Julia Camilla Boston Waverly, Ga. 

Russell, Nancy Buck Boxman, Md. 

Russell, Nora Gray Warrenton, N. C. 

Rust, Margaret Eleanor Clarksdale, Miss. 

Rustad, Llewellyn Rae Norge, Va. 

Rutman, Sally Saville Pennsburg, Pa. 

Ryan, Kathryn Theresa Peekskill, N. Y. 

Ryder, Janet Barbara Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Sadler, Margaret Ruth Arlington, Va. 

Salisbury, Nancy Louise Morrisville, Pa. 

Salmon, Dorothy Marie Tappahannock, Va. 

Sample, Pearl Lucas : Culpeper, Va. 

Samuels, Dorothy Ella Orange, Va. 

Sanderlin, Effie E Norfolk, Va. 

Sanford, Harriet A. Richmond, Va. 

Sanford, Nell Nevitt Danville, Va. 

Sargent, Ruth E Groveland, Mass. 

Saul, Beverley Jana Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Saunders, Cleo J Chase City, Va. 

Saunier, Lois . Richmond, Va. 

Savage, Elizabeth T Fredericksburg, Va. 

Scanland, Madaline V Salem, Va. 

Scearce, Frances Louise Louisville, Ky. 

Scearce, Mary Pulliam Culpeper, Va. 

Schachtler, Virginia C Coles Point, Va. 

Schirra, Georgia Louise Arlington, Va. 

Schier, Helen Virginia Norfolk, Va. 

Schottland, Eleanor Martinsville, Va. 

Schupp, Emily Wood —Phoenix, Ariz. 

Schwartz, Carol Helen BriarcliflF Manor, N. Y. 

Scott, Ann Mate Yonkers, N. Y. 

Scott, Doris Houghton N. Bennington, Vt. 

Scott, Dorothy Jane N. Bennington, Vt. 

Scott, Priscilla Jeanne Pontiac, Mich. 



Register of Students 181 

Scott, Sallie Woodson Franktown, Va. 

Sega, Josephine Esther New Preston, Conn. 

Sears, Jeanne Lillian Batavia, N. Y. 

Seay, Jenise Elizabeth Shores, Va. 

Seay, Margaret Petersburg, Va. 

Seay, Martha Kinsey Petersburg, Va. 

Self, Doris Elizabeth Village, Va. 

Self, Nora Julia Village, Va. 

Selvage, Marjorie Maxine Amherst, Va. 

Sevier, Katherine Louise Asheville, N. C. 

Seward, Sara India Elberon, Va. 

Shadwell, Jeanne Andrews Richmond, Va. 

Shamburger, Florence Elizabeth Richmond, Va. 

Shankweiler, Carolyn May Allentown, Pa. 

Shapland, Fifi Page St. Albans, Vt. 

Sharp, Polly Oil City, Pa. 

Shaw, Lelia Ruth Aberdeen, Md. 

Shea, Margaret Mary Hartland, Vt. 

Sheaks, Sylvia Lane New Market, Va. 

Sheehan, Rosemary P Landenberg, Pa. 

Sheffield, Mary Wilson Crewe, Va. 

Shelor, Nancy Newell Alexandria, Va. 

Shepherd, Dorothy D Petersburg, Va. 

Sherertz, Ethel Margarita Petersburg, Va. 

Shirley, Theodosia Gray -Greenwood, Va. 

Shivar, Lillian Frances Rembert, S. C. 

Sholes, Ann Warren Lynchburg, Va. 

Short, Mary Elizabeth . Maplewood, N. J. 

Shue, Jeanne Marie York, Pa. 

Shugart, Nancy Lee Pisgah, Md. 

Shull, Nancy Hancock Herndon, Va. 

Siebert, MurieL Jean Richmond, Va. 

Simcoe, Elizabeth Marie Hyattsville, Md. 

Simmons, Anne Ward Vienna, Va. 

Simmons, Elva Jane Petersburg, Va. 

Simmons, Gwendolyn Maclin Virginia Beach, Va. 

Simmons, Hans L Petersburg, Va. 

Simpson, Jean Douglas Carmel, N. Y. 

Singleton, Helen Dawn Rowland, N. C. 

Skeen, Mary Younger Mt. Jackson, Va. 

Slaughter, Gene Elvridge Richmond, Va. 

Smith, Arlene Virginia N. Andover, Mass. 

Smith, Alberta Frederick Petersburg, Va. 

Smith, Betty Ann Westport, Conn. 

Smith, Betsy Ellen Arlington, Va. 

Smith, Charlotte Dean Portsmouth, Va. 

Smith, Edna Ann Narrows, Va. 

Smith, Eloise Mae Kingston, N. Y. 

Smith, Irene Hume Haywood, Va. 

Smith, Jacqueline Cynthia Freeport, N. Y. 

Smith, Lois Yelton Newport News, Va. 

Smith, Marie Margaret Keyport, N. J. 

Smith, Mary Belle Madison, Va. 

Smith, Mary Nella Altavista, Va. 

Smith, Patsy Allen Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Smith, Ruth Bondurant Newport News, Va. 

Smith, Ruth Orsellia Eagle Rock, Va. 

Smith, Susie A Marshall, Va. 

Snell, Harriet Jacqueline Buffalo, N. Y. 

Snell, Ruth Chester Richmond, Va. 

Snellings, Christine Elizabeth -Fredericksburg, Va. 

Sorensen, Josephine Louise Highland Springs, Va. 



182 Mary Washington College 

Soucy, Marguerite Alice N. Andover, Mass. 

South, Marian Louise Truhart, Va. 

Spack, Barbara June Newton Center, Mass. 

Sparks, Betty Gene Alexandria, Va. 

Sparrow, Genevieve Lee Delmar, Del. 

Spencer, Elizabeth Barbara Baltimore, Md. 

Spencer, Henrietta Howard Beaverdam, Va. 

Sprinkle, Alice Joyce Gadsden, Ala. 

Stacey, Georgetta , Buckroe Beach, Va. 

Stacey, Roslyn Marie Buckroe Beach, Va. 

Stagg, Jeanne Newell . Snow Hill, Md. 

Stallings, Elizabeth Bryan . Miami, Fla. 

Stebbins, Frances Macmurdo Ashland, Va. 

Steele, Anna Louise Herndon, Va. 

Steele, Janie Gay Clarksdale, Miss. 

Stevens, Cecil Spotswood Lynchburg, Va. 

Stewart, Jacqueline Olive Wilmington, Del. 

Stoecker, Emily Beatrice Cazenovia, N. Y. 

Stone, Charlotte Byrd Onancock, Va. 

Storms, Marjorie Doris Tenafly, N. J. 

Story, Bessie J Santiago-de, Cuba 

Story, Dorothy Lawrence , Courtland, Va. 

Stover, Frances Rhoades Culpeper, Va. 

Strader, Betty Bane Alexandria, Va. 

Strang, Virginia Lucille Richmond, Va. 

Stringer, Gloria Lee New Brunswick, N. J. 

Strother, Lucy Mae Warrenton, Va. 

Sullivan, Clara Elizabeth Blackstone, Va. 

Sullivan, Mary Louise Richmond, Va. 

Sullivan, Shelia Patricia Fairfield, Conn. 

Sumpter, Jane Milton Roanoke, Va. 

Sutherland, Dorothy Sheppard Wilmington, N. C. 

Swartz, Jean Gibson Indian Rock, Va. 

Sweeney, Patricia Kathleen , Frankfort, N. Y. 

Sweet, Evelyn Lee West Orange, N. J. 

Sydnor, Virginia Elizabeth Village, Va. 

Taliaferro, Lavergne Vaughan Louisville, Ky. 

Talmage, Ann Elizabeth Petersburg, Va. 

Tansill, Diana Mary Fredericksburg, Va. 

Tate, Helen Frances Petersburg, Va. 

Tate, Mary Helen Marion, Va. 

Taylor, Barbara Anne Arlington, Va. 

Taylor, Betty Ann , King William, Va. 

Taylor, Doris Cleve Yorktown, Va. 

Taylor, Elena More Anson Martinsville, Va. 

Taylor, Emillie Jane Richlands, Va. 

Taylor, Florence Davidson Mobile, Ala. 

Taylor, Lillian Irene Herndon, Va. 

Taylor, Nancy Graham Pungoteague, Va. 

Teague, Kathryn J Lynchburg, Va. 

Teague, Sarah Mae Greensboro, N. C. 

Terrell, Mary Lou Field Boonton, N. J. 

Terrell, Roberta Field Boonton, N. J. 

Thatcher, Margaret Graham Washington, D. C. 

Thayer, Florence Moffett Warrenton, Va. 

Thimedes, Evelyn Norfolk, Va. 

Thomas, Ann Shepherd Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Thomas, Anne Marie Portsmouth, Va. 

Thomas, Barbara Ann Cape Charles, Va. 

Thomas, Ethel Lloyd Schley, Va. 



Register of Students 183 

Thomas, Llora Frances Schenectady, N. Y. 

Thomas, Margaret Morrison Fredericksburg, Va. 

Thompson, Ruby J 1 — Warrenton, Va. 

Thornton, Betty Frances Roanoke, Va. 

Thorpe, Eudora Waldrop Catlett, Va. 

Tierney, Patricia Ann Tuckahoe, N. J. 

Tigner, Shirley Wray Highland Springs, Va. 

Tiller, Jane Gray Glen Allen, Va. 

Tiller, Lucy Kathryn _ Richmond, Va. 

Tillery, Jeanne Sinclair Hampton, Va. 

Tillett, Ruth Ann , Hamilton, Va. 

Tillson, Susan Annapolis, Md. 

Tilson, Margaret Almira Manchester, N. H. 

Tilton, Ann DeKoven Fort Monroe, Va. 

Timberlake, Betty Littlepage Fredericksburg, Va. 

Tinsley, D. Virginia Culpeper, Va. 

Tobler, Grace Wilmer Verona, N. J. 

Todd, Leah Jane Washington, D. C. 

Todd, Lois Ann Washington, D. C. 

Tolbert, Robert Red Culpeper, Va. 

Topping, Arlene Mary Methuen, Mass. 

Torreyson, Jeanne deRochonnet Washington, D. C. 

Trainham, Elizabeth Hunter Marshall, Va. 

Tranum, Virginia Carmen , Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Travis, Margaret Patricia Ann Wilmington, Del. 

Tredway, Anne Rives Harrisonburg, Va. 

Trevett, Christine McDonald Richmond, Va. 

Trible, Rose McWane . Thoroughfare, Va. 

Trimble, Ellen Thompson.™ Hot Springs, Va. 

Trout, Betty Drake Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Trout, Dorothy Kistler Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Trosvig, Milla Julia Lightfoot, Va. 

Truesdale, Elizabeth Belle Germantown, Pa. 

Tuck, Hattie LaVergne Stuart, Va. 

Tuck, Peggy Sue , Richmond, Va. 

Tucker, Effie B Radiant, Va. 

Tucker, Margaret Ann Arlington, Va. 

Turner, Genevieve Eley Carrollton, Va. 

Turner, Mary Marie . Ashburn, Va. 

Tweedy, Gladys Elizabeth Lynchburg, Va. 

Tyler, Edwina Eliza Westbrook, Conn. 

Tyler, Harriet Bright Portsmouth, Va. 

Tyndall, Betty Marie Newark, Md. 

Tynes, Anne Elizabeth , Elberon, Va. 

tf Unsworth, Phyllis Jean Vineland, N. J. 

I Utz, Blanche Clore Brightwood, Va. 

Valldejuli, Carmen Margarita San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Valle, Anna Maria Costa Guterres Rio dejaniero, Brazil 

Valley, Carmen Laverne . Pembine, Wis. 

Vanderslice, Dorothea Little Arlington, Va. 

Van Deventer, Marjorie W. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Van Gaasbeek, Jacquelyn Ruth Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Van Welt, Shirley Anne Pontiac, Mich. 

Vaughan, Elizabeth Carolyn Crewe, Va. 

Vawter, Dorothy Mae Trevilians, Va. 

Veazey, Jeanne Richmond, Va. 

Velleca, Bernice Mary Roseville, Va. 

Verlander, Nannie Gurleen Richmond, Va. 



184 Mary Washington College 



Via, Lorraine Estelle Danville, Va. 

Vian, Anita Jeanne Irvington, N. J. 

Vick, Susan Frances Wilson, N. C. 

Vincent, Florence Elizabeth Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Vincent, Stella Meade Emporia, Va. 

Vives, Carmen Irene Utuado, Puerto Rico 

Vreeland, Helen Gale Morris Plains, N. J. 

Vreeland, Mildred Alvina Morris Plains, N. J. 

Vriens, Margery Ellin Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Waddell, Anne Addison University, Va. 

Waddell, Mary Elizabeth Drakes Branch, Va. 

Wagner, Sara Elizabeth Falls Church, Va. 

Waite, Louene Elizabeth Virginia Beach, Va. 

Walke, Nancy Duval Centralia, Va. 

Walker, Catherine Anne Raeford, N. C. 

Walker, Eleanor Frances Farnham, Va. 

Walker, Frances Rebecca Shacklefords, Va. 

Walker, Mary Elizabeth Shacklefords, Va. 

Wallnau, Gloria Etta Richmond, Va. 

Walsh, Clara Elizabeth Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Walsh, Martha Munt Petersburg, Va. 

Walsh, Virginia Lenore Cranford, N. J. 

Walton, Ann Catherine _Danville, Va. 

Wambersie, Alice Boxley Orange, Va. 

Ward, Emily Elizabeth Roswell, N. M. 

Ward, Jacqueline , Roanoke, Va. 

Warner, Eleanor Constance Windsor, Conn 

Warren, Betty Elaine , Washington, D. C. 

Warriner, Martha Annette Lawrenceville, Va. 

Waterfield, Betty Virginia Pungoteague, Va. 

Waters, Marian Virginia Washington Grove, Md. 

Watkin, Sarah Sweigart Avondale, Pa. 

Watkins, Mauroreen Frances Winchester, Va. 

Watkins, Gene Acree Lottsburg, Va. 

Watts, Frances Elizabeth Parksley, Va. 

Weaver, Elizabeth Jenkins Radiant, Va. 

Webb, Mary Blanche —Norfolk, Va. 

Webb, Mary Barbara Branchville, Va. 

Weed, Joyce Campbell Rutherford, N. J. 

Wedderburn, George Vienna, Va. 

Weisenfluh, Beverly May M. W. Hartford, Conn. 

Weisiger, Frances Evelyn Richmond, Va. 

Weiss, Anne Louise Culpeper, Va. 

Welborn, Norma Frances Toronto, Ohio 

Welch, Doris Springfield, Mass. 

Welch, Frances Priscilla Suffolk, Va. 

Welch, Rae Fredericksburg, Va. 

Welday, Elva Jean Smithfield, Ohio 

Wells, Alice Claflin Wellesley, Mass. 

Wells, Barbara Carolyn Laconia, N. H. 

West, Ann Louis Roanoke, Va. 

West, Ethlyn Atwood Hampton, Va. 

Westerman, Rosemary Virginia Clifton Forge, Va. 

White, Anna Laetitia Portsmouth, Va. 

White, Dorothy Emma Trenton, N. J. 

White, Evelyn Pauline Atlanta, Ga. 

White, Geraldine Dawson Charlottesville, Va. 

White, Lina Isabel Lorton, Va. 

White, Mary Doyle Elberon, Va. 

White, Ruth Alwilda Painesville, Ohio 



Register of Students 185 



Whitley, Miriam Marjorie Alexandria, Va. 

Whitlock, Jewell Blacksburg, Va. 

Whitlow, Bessie Lottie Bremo Bluff, Va. 

Whitmarsh, Elizabeth Darling Binghamton, N. Y. 

Whitmore, Ellen Christine Hagerstown, Md. 

Whitted, Margaret Adelle Warren, Va. 

Whythe, Kitty Friend Petersburg, Va. 

Wilcox, Lucy Landon Petersburg, Va. 

Wilkerson, Vivian Myrtle Highland Springs, Va. 

Wilkinson, Helen McRae Union Level, Va. 

Wilkinson, Lois Christine Richmond, Va. 

Wilkinson, Velma Clarine Richmond, Va. 

Wille, Esther Rae , Shreveport, La. 

Williams, Barbara B Bridgewater, Mass. 

Williams, Betty Lee Hampton, Va. 

Williams, Carolyn Ann Richmond, Va. 

Williams, Donna Jean Galax, Va. 

Williams, Ellen Leslee Norfolk, Va. 

Williams, Ida Rawlings Emporia, Va. 

Williams, Madeline Jean . New York, N. Y. 

Williams, Mae Catherine Charlottesville, Va. 

Williams, Margaret A Barhamsville, Va. 

Williams, Nancy Augusta Oak Grove, Va. 

Williams, Naomi Glenn Keeling, Va. 

Williams, Rebecca Robinson Alexandria, Va. 

Williams, Rebecca Rose Suffolk, Va. 

Williams, Virginia Ann Richmond, Va. 

Williamson, Carol Byrd Norfolk, Va. 

Williamson, Catherine Ann Bronxville, N. Y. 

Williamson, Florence Ackerley Massapequa, N. Y. 

Williamson, Helen Pennoyer Massapequa, N. Y. 

Willis, Laura M , Fredericksburg, Va. 

Wilson, Betty Ann Evanston, 111. 

Wilson, Elizabeth Wayne Chilhowie, Va. 

Wilson, Janet Temple Fredericksburg, Va. 

Wilson, Lois Graf Chester, Pa. 

Wilson, Sarah Virginia , Altoona, Pa. 

Wilson, Virginia Belle Knoxville, Tenn. 

Windram, Jean Marie Leesburg, Fla. 

Winn, Margueritte Walker Portsmouth, Va. 

Winslow, Mary Roberta Vienna, Va. 

Wire, Stella Elizabeth Lovettsville, Va. 

Wise, Anne Marie Wilmington, Del. 

Withers, Dorothy Marian , Point Pleasant, W. Va. 

Withers, Virginia Anne Memphis, Tenn. 

Withrow, Betty Ann Clifton Forge, Va. 

Wohnus, Love Louise Long Island, N. Y. 

Womble, Adine Elizabeth Caldwell, Tex. 

Womer, Susan Marjorie W. Hartford, Conn. 

Wood, Anne Grimsley Philadelphia, Pa. 

Wood, Jean Browning Culpeper, Va. 

Woodward, Bettie Pollard Saluda, Va. 

Woodward, Roberta Boxley Saluda, Va. 

Woody, Marjorie Arline Petersburg, Va. 

Wooldridge, Kathryn Carney : Norfolk, Va. 

Work, Ruth Beedle Wilmington, Del. 

Worsham, Bette Jane , Richmond, Va. 

Worsley, Janice Corrine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Wrenn, Helen Joyce Richmond, Va. 

Wright, Laura Spencer McColl, S. C. 

Wrigley, Ellen Rita Arlington, Va. 



186 Mary Washington College 



Wycoff, Barbara Lee Spartanburg, S. C. 

Wyman, Helen Lee No. Abington, Mass. 



Yeaton, Jeanne Marie Milton, Mass. 

York, Ruby Mae Chase City, Va. 

Yost, Marie Elaine Arlington, Va. 

Yost, Nancy Louise , Hazleton, Pa.-' 

Young, Barbara Edith Fredericksburg, Va. 

Young, Celene Hampton Galax, Va. 

Young, Lucille Halies , Richmond, Va. 

Yowell, Claude Lindsay Madison, Va. 

Yowell, Elizabeth Jane i Peola Mills, Va. 

Yowell, Frances M. Mitchells, Va. 

Yowell, Ruth C. -Madison, Va. 



Zamecnik, Beatrice Agnes Orange, Va. 

Zehrbach, Barbara Lee Hampton, Va. 

Zimmerman, Shirley M. Pontiac, Mich. 

Zoshack, Loraine Elsie Rutherford, N. J. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
Summer 1944 

Abrams, Cora Vaughan Fredericksburg, Va. 

Abshure, June McClave Chevy Chase, Md. 

Adams, Joseph Henry Kilmarnock, Va. 

Affinito, Gloria Johanne New Haven, Conn. 

Aitcheson, Nancy Dare Alexandria, Va. 

Alderman, Martha Ruby Richmond, Va. 

Algar, Marguerite Catharine Miami, Fla. 

Alvis, Ellen Ernestine . Richmond, Va. 

Anderson, Mary Ann Chatham, Va. 

Arrow, Virginia Elizabeth Pittsfield, Mass. 

Austin, Katharine B Warrenton, Va. 



Badillo, Auristela Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Bailey, Mary Virginia Richmond, Va. 

Bailey, Muriel Ann New Castle, Del. 

Baker, Florence Arlene Myersville, Md. 

Baker, Lottie H Washington, D. C. 

Baker, Mary Alice Arlington, Va. 

Baldwin, Virginia Claire . Atlee, Va. 

Ballenger, Maxine Round Hill, Va. 

Bane, Betty Holland Marion, Va. 

Banisch, Elizabeth Marie Ashland, Va. 

Banks, Grace Catherine Louisville, Ky. 

Bardill, Mary Helen Harriman, Tenn. 

Barton, Mary Murray Rockbridge, Va. 

Beard, Geneva Gott Annapolis Junction, Md. 

Beauchamp, Laura Wallace Callao, Va. 

Beavers, Gladys Pearson Purcellville, Va. 

Bellows, Catherine Dix White Stone, Va. 

Beltram, Aida Alicia Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Berry, Emily Caroline Arlington, Va. 

Berry, Meda Dwyer Madison, Va. 

Best, Lucile Round Hill, Va. 

Bien, Gloria Evelyn Fords, N. J. 

Bishop, Maude Anstsis Cranford, N. J. 

Blackburn, Barbara Jane Fredericksburg, Va. 

Blackiston, Aprille Alexander Charlotte, N. C. 

Blackwell, Betty Claughton Remo, Va. 

Blackwell, Geneva Susan Dillwyn, Va. 

Bland, Marjorie Louise . Plain View, Va. 

Blundon, Susie Norris Lively, Va. 

Bock, Sarah Verna Collegeville, Pa. 

Booth, Fannie Lee Haynie Burgess Store, Va. 

Borgett, Geraldine Gloria Woodbridge, N. J. 

Bourne, Hannah Lorena Saluda, Va. 

Bowers, Elizabeth Mahoney *. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Boyd, Dorothy Jane Richmond, Va. 

Boyer, Mary Louise Shacklefords, Va. 

Bradder, Mavis Lillian , Rutland, Vt. 

Bragg, Susie Baker Culpeper, Va. 

Bramham, Jean South Hill, Va. 

Brann, Ruth Abbey Plainfield, N. J. 

Brinegar, Virginia Sue North Tazewell, Va. 

Britton, Audrey Raymond , Richmond, Va. 

Broach, Hazel Frances Index, Va. 



188 Mary Washington College 

Broaddus, Lena Wortham Partlow, Va. 

Broadhurst, Gennilla Atkins Rixeyville, Va. 

Brockley, Florence A. Hampton, Va. 

Brooks, Helen Gary . Richmond, Va. 

Brown, Gloria Eleanor Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brown, Susan Frances Richmond, Va. 

Browning, Elizabeth Bruce Culpeper, Va. 

Bull, Mary Catherine Charleston, S. C. 

Burchard, Prudence Elizabeth Oxford, N. Y. 

Burfoot, Mary Virginia Midlothian, Va. 

Burford, Fisher Eastham Church Road, Va. 

Burnette, Alice Kathleen * Rustburg, Va. 

Burnside, Gloria Irene Richmond, Va. 

Burrus, Bettie Austin Hot Springs, Va. 

Burton, Christine Parasade Culpeper, Va. 

Burton, Mary Anne Brooke, Va. 



Caffey, Gertrude Small Round Hill, Va. 

Cammer, Margaret Ann Winchester, Va. 

Campbell, Ellen Chisholm White Plains, N. Y. 

Carey, Ellen Lenore Georgetown, Del. 

Carl, Jean Roselyn , Paulsboro, N. J. 

Carter, Ethel Irene Manassas, Va. 

Carter, Mary Joan Clifton Forge, Va. 

Caruthers, Grace Davis Colonial Beach, Va. 

Cash, Hazel McAllister Unionville, Va. 

Castine, Mary , Portsmouth, Va. 

Cather, Jeanne Elizabeth Winchester, Va. 

Caulk, Josephine Trappe, Md. 

Cebollero, Gladys Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Chandler, Margaret Maplewood, N. J. 

Charles, Arbelia Mae ^Arlington, Va. 

Chase, Nellie Gordon Kilmarnock, Va. 

Chilton, Mary Campbell Jeffersonton, Va. 

Chinn, Grace Jones Fredericksburg, Va. 

Chrisman, Hilda Mae_ , Roanoke, Va. 

Chryssikos, Georgia Inez Bedford, Va. 

Cintron, Elsa Reyes Arecibo, Puerto Rico 

Cintron, Iris Reyes Arecibo, Puerto Rico 

Ciuffreda, Diana New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Clark, Elsie Graham Lively, Va. 

Clements, Helen Beatrice Saluda, Va. 

Cloe, Mary Payne Falmouth, Va. 

Cloney, Rose Virginia , Richmond, Va. 

Cockerill, Margaret G. North Fork, Va. 

Cockrell, Edith Norfolk, Va. 

Cole, Jane Meade , Chilhowie, Va. 

Compton, Carolyn Lee Rocky Mount, Va. 

Comulada, Gloria Marie Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Conley, Jayne Gayle Radford, Va. 

Cook, Elizabeth Carol Weehawken, N. J. 

Cooper, Garland Stoneham Mollusk, Va. 

Coppedge, Nellie Ruth Kilmarnock, Va. 

Corcoran, Frances Ellen Bennington, Vt 

Cornwell, Louise Parks Lancaster, Va. 

Cottam, Elsie Virginia , Burkeville, Va. 

Covington, Elizabeth Downing Burgess Store, Va. 

Cox, Auralea Galax, Va. 

Cox, Lillian Gordon Dahlgren, Va. 

Coyner, Lucy Lee Waynesboro, Va. 

Craig, Catharine Frances Waynesboro, Va. 



Register of Students 189 



Craig, May Joe Abingdon, Va. 

Cross, Dorothy Jean Covington, Va. 

Crowder, Virginia May Staunton, Va. 

Crowther, Ruth Walker Avalon, Va. 

Crump, Landon Cutler Hopewell, Va. 

Curry, Mary Harrisburg, Pa. 

Curry, Ola M Norfolk, Va. 

Curtis, Duane Eloise -Chester, Va. 

Curtis, Marguerite Craddockville, Va. 



Dalton, Edythe Virginia Wightman, Va. 

Dameron, Marguerite Ida Haynesville, Va. 

D'Armond, Barbara June Harriman, Tenn. 

Darst, Mary Ellen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Davis, Nelda Lee Petersburg, Va. 

Dawideit, Anne , Ferndale, Mich. 

Dawson, M. Henrietta - Lodge, Va. 

Dellinger, Hildred Lackey Connelly Springs, N. C. 

Denny, Jean Virginia White Post, Va. 

Dickinson, Nancye Ruth Alexandria, Va. 

Dieter, Rose Mary *. Fredericksburg, Va. 

Dixon, Mildred Elizabeth . Richmond, Va. 

Donald, Josephine Bagby Petersburg, Va. 

Dooley, Julia Jean Bedford, Va. 

Dorsheimer, Betsy Margaret Teaneck, N. J. 

Douros, Helen Norfolk, Va. 

Douglass, Nancy Pittman ___Memphis, Tenn. 

Downing, Frances Brent Burgess Store, Va. 

Drake, Dorothy Emma Fredericksburg, Va. 

Drewry, Betty Moore ! Boykins, Va. 

Driscoll, Louise Mae ___Lanexa, Va. 

Dulaney, Gladys Lillian Etlan, Va. 

Dungan, Dorothy Daydon . Callao, Va. 

Dunkum, Elizabeth Jane Dillwyn, Va. 

Dunn, Ethel Florence Baskerville, Va. 

Dupre, Jeanne Marie , Arlington, Va. 

Dutch, Barbara Ann Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Duval, Lucy Lipscomb Norfolk, Va. 



Edwards, Gertrude Harrell Fredericksburg, Va. 

Edwards, Judith Ann Chatham, Va. 

Edwards, Kathleen ^ Fredericksburg, Va. 

Ellington, Mayola Keysville, Va. 

Ellis, Mary Bumpass, Va. 

Ellison, Frances Erlene Portsmouth, Va. 

Emmons, Ann Elizabeth Boykins, Va. 

Engelbrecht, Dorothy Margaret Frederick, Md. 

Ennis, Frances Sanders White Stone, Va. 

Enroughty, Audrey Virginia Richmond, Va. 

Eustace, Avis Reamy Potomac Mills, Va. 

Everett, Anne Eley Newsoms, Va. 

Everton, Rose , Norfolk, Va. 



Falls, Margaret Fellows Farnham, Va. 

Fardette, Betty Jane Hilton Village, Va. 

Fardette, Peggy Frances Hilton Village, Va. 

Farmer, Aileen Louise Arlington, Va. 

Farshing, Margaret Ramsay . Washington, D. C. 

Feaster, Helena Ann Brooklyn, N. Y. 



190 Mary Washington College 

Feaster, Joan Margaret Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ficklin, Frances E Ottoman, Va. 

Forest, Rachael Clyde Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 

Forrest, Thalia Grace Messick, Va. 

Foster, Dora Arraistead Mathews, Va. 

Foster, Elmer Willis Washington, D. C 

Fox, Isobel Frances Warrenton, Va. 

Frazier, Margaret Elizabeth Fredericksburg, Va. 

Frost, Frances Hundley Centre Cross, Va. 

Fulcher, Annie Dibrell Sandidges, Va. 

Fulk, Betty Ellen Charles Town, W. Va. 

Fuller, Alice Louise Dayton, Ohio 

Furr, Bertha B Lake Worth, Fla. 

Fuss, Susan Victoria Columbus, Ga. 



Gale, Edith Lane Rushmere, Va. 

Gandia, Sara Isabel Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Garcia, Nilda Aurora : Utuado, Puerto Rico 

Gardiner, Rita Charlotte Indian Head, Md. 

Garland, Claude V. Warsaw Va. 

Garland, Nannie Wiatt Village, Va. 

Garner, Mary Frances Bethesda, Md. 

Gates, Marguerite Richmond, Va. 

Gibbs, Doris Ethelyn . „ Arlington, Va. 

Gonzalez, Ana Louisa Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

Goodloe, Anne Reamy Fredericksburg, Va. 

Gordon, Mary Payne Berea, Va. 

Gouldin, Mary Moseley _Bagby, Va. 

Gouldman, Jane Goulding Homers, Va. 

Grant, Hilda Vaughn Monroe, Va. 

Green, Mildred Virginia Amissville, Va. 

Greene, Nancy Glenes . Fredericksburg, Va. 

Gregg, Elizabeth Dunaway White Stone, Va. 

Griffin, Frances Moveland Culpeper, Va. 

Hale, Hilda F Jamaica, Va. 

Haley, Anne Shirlee Newport News, Va. 

Haley, Jene Glenna Newport News, Va. 

Hall, Colleen Haley , Pulaski, Va. 

Hall, Sarah Elizabeth Heathsville, Va. 

Hamburg, Lena A Norfolk, Va. 

Hancock, Sarah Frances Manning, S. C. 

Hardaway, Jean Rebecca Stony Creek, Va. 

Harding, Marion Carey Lilian, Va. 

Harnden, Alice Patten, Me. 

Harper, Jean Elizabeth , Warrenton, Va. 

Harrell, Frances Leone Emporia, Va. 

Harris, Nellie Williams Spotsylvania, Va. 

Harrison, Katharine Strachan Newport News, Va. 

Hatcher, Amy Lee Danville, Va. 

Hawkins, Clara Margaret Culpeper, Va. 

Hawkins, Helen Smith Lynchburg, Va. 

Hawn, Bethany Annette Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Hayden, Betty Jane Centerville, Md. 

Haydon, Louise Luttrell Callao, Va. 

Haynie, Elenora L Kilmarnock, Va. 

Henley, Elizabeth Yonce Marshall, Va. 

Heverly, Mary Louise Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Highsmith, Eleanor Mayo Wilmington, N. C. 

Hilldrup, Betsy Gordon Spotsylvama, Va. 



Register of Students 191 

Hinnant, Doris Fay , Micro, N. C. 

Hoggard, Susan Coke , Norfolk, Va. 

Holman, Kathryn Wanamaker Lynchburg, Va. 

Holzhauer, Alice K Richmond, Va. 

Honaker, Edith D Fredericksburg, Va. 

Horton, Jean Marie JonesviUe, Va. 

Horton, Martha Elaine , Richmond, Va. 

Horton, Phyllis Edward Richlands, Va. 

Houchens, Harriet Alberta Sandston, Va. 

Hubbard, Mildred Lucille Stedman, N. C. 

Hudgins, Rosalyn Brownley . Port Haywood, Va. 

Hudson, Jean Dinges , Culpeper, Va. 

Hudson, Mary Virginia Cobbs Creek, Va. 

Huff, Margaret Delorese '. Norfolk, Va. 

Hughes, Nancy Brodohan Fleeton, Va. 

Humphries, Anne Beaverdam, Va. 

Humphries, Frances Beasley Partlow, Va. 

Hunter, Elizabeth Ina Framingham, Mass. 

Hurley, Ruth Ann Macon, Ga. 

Hntchinson, Betty Ann Walkerton, Va. 

Hutchinson, Virginia Mae Metuchen, N. J. 

Hurt, Jo Warren Montross, Va. 



Jamison, Laura Conlon Silver Spring, Md. 

Jamison, Ruby Janette Boones Mill, Va. 

Janes, Mary Alice Columbus, Ga. 

Janes, Shirley Irene , Miama, Fla. 

Jerrell, Ola Bly Brokenburg, Va. 

Johnson, Ann Biscoe Hampton, Va. 

Johnson, Betty Helene Fredericksburg, Va. 

Johnson, Frances Scott Fredericksburg, Va. 

Johnson, Harriet Hall Fordwick, Va. 

Johnson, Mary Elizabeth Herndon, Va. 

Jolly, Janet Sutton South Hill, Va. 

Jones, Doris Eleanor Fredericksburg, Va. 

Jones, Nellie Celeste— Richmond, Va. 

Jones, Willa Pinkstone Raleigh, N. C. 



Keelen, Provi Josefina Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 

Keener, Jean Elizabeth Lampeter, Pa. 

Kemp, Virginia Bruyere _ Arlington, Va. 

Kidd, Annie Kirk , Lexington, Va. 

King, Lillian Hall Tangier, Va. 

Klein, Betty Irene Frederick, Md. 

Klein, June Natalie Frederick, Md. 

Knox, Anne Shirley Richmond, Va. 

Kroh, Anne Elizabeth Frederick, Md. 

Klye, Ellen Catherine Richmond, Va. 

Lacy, Celia Nelson , Fredericksburg, Va. 

Lamberth, Mary Virginia White Marsh, Va. 

Lamberth, Mildred Watson White Marsh, Va. 

Lanham, Doris Naomi Alexandria, Va. 

Lawton, Betty Louise Riverdale, Md. 

Leary, Edna Earle Ahoskie, N. C. 

LeCompte, Isabel Mason Richmond, Va. 

Leddy, Mary Louise Camden, N. J. 

Lee, Carol Lee Front Royal, Va. 

Lee, Dorothea Simpson Reidsville, N. C. 



192 Mary Washington College 

Leigh, Cecillia Beiser Leesburg, Va. 

Lenoir, Frances Catherine Cordele, Ga. 

Lescure, Dorothy Mae Hopewell, Va. 

Link, Lucy P Parker, Va. 

Linthicum, Esther Pearl Ringgold, Va. 

Littman, Jane Donaldson Oakland, Md. 

Loflin, Margie Rae Lynchburg, Va. 

Lowery, Thelma Turner King and Queen C. H., Va. 

Lunceford, Eliza Dowdell Bluemont, Va. 

McClain, Evelyn Washington, D. C. 

"McClellan, Elinor Mae , Norfolk, Va. 

McCullough, Doris Jean Elmira Heights, N. Y. 

McDonough, Gloria Marie Round Hill, Va. 

McDowell, Cora Jane Suffolk, Va. 

McGlothlin, Helen Virginia Richlands, Va. 

McGrath, Evelyn Catherine Holyoke, Mass. 

McKelvy, Frances Elizabeth New River, N. C. 

McKenney, Elizabeth B White Stone, Va. 

McLeod, Margarette Ann Norfolk, Va. 

McLure, Alice Ezelle '. Columbia, S. C. 

McNair, Elizabeth Yerkes Annapolis, Md. 

McTeer, Betty Louise Moncks Corner, S. C. 

McWhirt, Madaline Beach Falmouth, Va. 

Macheras, Lillie Lexington, Va. 

MacLeay, Muriel Arleen , New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Mahan, Mary Jo Taunton, Mass. 

Marsh, Peggy Lou Tanquary Hagerstown, Md. 

Marshall, Isabelle Bransford Cohasset, Va. 

Marshall, Marguerite Irene Jersey, Va. 

Martin, Uldine Moncks Corner, S. C. 

Mason, Edith Snead Mineral, Va. 

Matthews, Margaret Ann Staunton, Va. 

Matthieu, Mary Adele Portsmouth, Va. 

Matzek, Barbara Ruth Westfield, Mass. 

May, Mildred Ruth Occoquan, Va. 

May, Suzanne Agnes Wellesley Farms, Mass. 

Mayo, Helen Virginia Washington, D. C. 

Mayse, Frances Stewart Round Hill, Va. 

Mears, Margaret Ellen Chincoteague, Va. 

Mercer, Dorothy Jeannette i McClellanville, S. C. 

Mercer, Grace Cruikshank White Stone, Va. 

Miles, Marilyn Eunice Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Miley, Ida M Round Hill, Va. 

Miller, Amy Lee Bealeton, Va. 

Miller, Dorothy Marie __Norfolk, Va. 

Mitchell, Amy Ivadell Waldrop, Va. 

Mitchell, Clare Walkerton, Va. 

Mitchell, Kathleen Ann New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Monroe, Mary Piedrich Round Hill, Va. 

Moore, Betsy Emma Chatham, Va. 

Moore, Mary Ethel Chatham, Va. 

Morris, Nell Virginia Round Hill, Va. 

Morris, Tabitha Verbena Alexandria, Va. 

Morrison, Carolyn Jean Wilmington, Del. 

Morse, Jean Frances Washington, D. C. 

Moseley, Joan Washington^ D. C. 

Moss, Josephine Compton Chase City, Va. 

Muir, Grace Elizabeth Reedville, Va. 

Murden, Ann Holt Portsmouth, Va. 

Myers, Eliza George Lovettsville, Va. 

Myers, Robert A Lovettsville, Va. 



Register of Students 193 



Nevitt, Frances Elizabeth Lorton, Va. 

Nichols, Willie Lee Bedford, Va. 

Nixon, Evelyn Williams Winchester, Va. 

Noble, Katherine Saunders Caret, Va. 

Norman, Jean Rebecca Haymarket, Va. 

Norman, Mary Lillian Haymarket, Va. 

Nowag, Dorothy Rachel Johnstown, Pa. 

Nunnally, Edith Hatchett Pine Bluff, Ark. 



O'Rourke, Mary Rita New Bedford, Mass. 

Ortiz, Haydee Celeste Aibonito, Puerto Rico 

Osinski, Wanda Evelyn Westfield, Mass. 

Owens, Mary Ellyson Nokesville, Va. 



Page, Nona 01us_ , Edgehill, Va. 

Palmer, Jane Jolliffe Purcellville, Va. 

Pardo, Rosalia Mayaquez, Puerto Rico 

Parker, Naomi Edwina Corbin, Ky. 

Parks, Hilda deForrest Arlington, Va. 

Parks, Ruth Strickland Tangier, Va. 

Parsley, Jeanne Marie Washington, D. C. 

Patterson, Annie Louise Esmont, Va. 

Patteson, Betty Jo Richlands, Va. 

Patterson, Maxine Lucille Stafford, Va. 

Paul, Ann Norfolk, Va. 

Payne, Hester Sydnor Purcellville, Va. 

Pearman, Ida Barber Bon Air, Va. 

Pearson, Frances Elizabeth Lawrenceville, Va. 

Peery, Phyllis Hope .-Pocahontas, Va. 

Pemberton, Phyllis Jane Richmond, Va. 

Peters, Marie Cox Catlett, Va. 

Peterson, Dorothy May .-Washington, D. C. 

Phillips, Mary Deane Richmond, Va. 

Phipps, Ruth Patterson Waynesboro, Va. 

Piggott, Lillian Lawson Purcellville, Va. 

Pittman, Lyra Palm Beach, Fla. 

Pollard, Gladys Duncan Petersburg, Va. 

Poteee, Helen Marguerite Richmond, Va. 

Powell, Mary Martin Fredericksburg, Va. 

Price, Juanita Irene Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Pruitt, Marguerite Tangier, Va. 

Pullian, Marian Jerrell Brokenburg, Va. 

Purdy, Frances Eaton New York, N. Y. 

Quillan, Jacquelyn Virginia Hopewell, Va. 



Radolinski, Alice Helen Fredericksburg, Va. 

Rady, Harriet Elizabeth Richmond, Va. 

Ragland, Estelle Sale Gore, Va. 

Ramey, Grace Anderson Warrenton, Va. 

Ramsburg, Rose Ellen Berryville, Va. 

Randall, Alice Wilkins . Monroe Hall, Va. 

Ratcliffe, Agnes Kathleen Richmond, Va. 

Rawlings, Alice Gray Fredericksburg, Va. 

Reamy, Evelyn June Arlington, Va. 

Reamy, Rebecca Anne , Edwardsville, Va. 

Reed, Jane Althea Wilmington, Del. 

Rey, Amy Louise Maspeth, L. I., N. Y. 



194 Mary Washington College 

Ribet, Emily Catherine Valdese, N. C. 

Richardson, Ann Waverly, Va. 

Richardson, Geraldine Harvey Kents Store, Va. 

Richardson, Laulie Friedlin Norfolk, Va. 

Riddle, Mary Anne Norfolk, Va. 

Rinehart, Jewel Yvonne Baltimore, Md. 

Ritchie, Helen Marie . Mooresville, N. C. 

Rivery, Maria Raquel LaHabana, Cuba 

Robinson, Kathleen Elizabeth Fredericksburg, Va. 

Robinson, Mary Janet Victoria, Va. 

Rodes, Alene Odum Lexington, Va. 

Rodriquez, Carmen Ana Arecibo, Puerto Rico 

Rodriquez, Maria Cristiana Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Rogers, Jane Hamilton, Va. 

Rohr, Carolyn Elizabeth Manassas, Va. 

Ross, Anne Claire Richmond, Va. 

Ross, Lilly Ann Ferrum, Va. 

Routzahn, Lea June Middletown, Md. 

Rowe, Audrey Hearl Norfolk, Va. 

Rowe, A. Kathleen Heathsville, Va. 

Rush, Julia Catherine Norfolk, Va. 

Russell, Adelia Ann Concord, Tenn. 

Rutman, Sally Saville Pennsburg, Pa. 

Ryan, Kathryn Theresa Peekskill, N. Y. 



Salmon, Dorothy Marie Tappahannock, Va. 

Samuels, Virginia Rose Richmond, Va. 

Sanderline, Effie Elizabeth .Norfolk, Va. 

Sanford, Harriet Alverta Richmond, Va. 

Sanford, Julia Crabbe Kilmarnock, Va. 

Savedge, Mildred Mae Smithfield, Va. 

Scales, Marjorie Morris Richmond, Va. 

Schaeffer, Betty Connell Clifton Forge, Va. 

Schier, Helen Virginia Norfolk, Va. 

Schulke, Ruth Dillon Purcellville, Va. 

Scoggin, Bessie Wilson Petersburg, Va. 

Seay, Elva Kelley . Hillsboro, Va. 

Segall, Hope Purdy New York, N. Y. 

Self, Doris Elizabeth Village, Va. 

Self, Nora Julia Village, Va. 

Sellars, Nettie Inez Cradock, Va. 

Sewell, Lola Mabbott Palm Beach, Fla. 

Shackelford, Mildred H Round Hill, Va. 

Shadwell, Jeanne Andrews Richmond, Va. 

Shamburger, F. Elizabeth Richmond, Va. 

Shaw, Lelia Ruth Aberdeen, Md. 

Shea, Margaret Mary Hartland, Vt 

Sheeler, Ann Elizabeth , Syracuse, N. Y. 

Shelton, Carrie E Fredericksburg, Va. 

Shull, Nancy Hancock Herndon, Va. 

Simpson, Helen B Paeonian Springs, Va. 

Simpson, Helen N North Fork, Va. 

Simpson, J. Lupton Paeonian Springs, Va. 

Simpson, Marion Porter Paeonian Springs, Va. 

Skeen, Mary Younger Mt. Jackson, Va. 

Smith, Elizabeth Frances Mt. Hope, W. Va. 

Smith, Mary Willie Leesburg, Va. 

Smith, Ruth Bondurant Newport News, Va. 

Smith, Mary Lee Culpeper, Va. 

Smith, Mary Nella Altavista, Va. 

Sorensen, Josephine Louise Highland Springs, Va. 



Register Of Students 195 

Spencer, Elizabeth Barbara Baltimore, Md. 

Stallings, Elizabeth Bryan ,__Miami, Fla. 

Stephenson, Mary Antoinette Garysburg, N. C. 

Stoder, Virginia Marshall Kents Store, Va. 

Stoneburner, Anna Louise . Leesburg, Va. 

Sullivan, Clara Elizabeth Blackstone, Va. 

Sutton, Elvira Elizabeth Bruington, Va. 

Sydnor, Eva Crabbe Morattico, Va. 

Sydnor, Virginia E , Village, Va. 

Tanner, Christine Maria Wolftown, Va. 

Tanner, Helen Banks Wolftown, Va. 

Tanner, Ouida Lee Etlan, Va. 

Tansill, Diana Mary Fredericksburg, Va. 

Taylor, Barbara Anne Arlington, Va: 

Taylor, Eraillie Jane Richlands, Va. 

Taylor, Mabel A Lincoln, Va. 

Teed, Reta C Fredericksburg, Va. 

Thames, Dorothy C Georgetown, S. C. 

Thames, Julia Emogene McClellanville, S. C. 

Thimedes, Evelyn Norfolk, Va. 

Thomas, Margaret Morrison Fredericksburg, Va. 

Thompson, Nellie Elizabeth Orange, Va. 

Thomson, Ruby Marguerite Dahlgren, Va. 

Tilson, Margaret Almira! Manchester, N. H. 

Timberlake, Betty Littlepage Fredericksburg, Va. 

Tisdale, Ruth Elam Baskerville, Va. 

Todd, Leath Jane , Washington, D. C. 

Tredway, Anne Rives Harrisonburg, Va. 

Tribby, Margaret Graham Purcellville, Va. 

Tucker, Dorothy Doyle Norfolk, Va. 

Tyler, Audrey Waterman Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tynes, Anne Elizabeth Elberon, Va. 



Valldejuli Carmen Margarita , San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Vanlngen, Annette Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Vaughan, Elizabeth Carolyn Crewe, Va. 

Vega, Lillian Idalia Camuy, Puerto Rico 

Verlander, Mary Catherine Oceana, Va. 

Verlander, N. Gurleen Richmond, Va. 

Vest, Helen Martha . Richmond, Va. 

Vincent, Stella Meade Emporia, Va. 

Vives, Carmen Irene Utuado, Puerto Rico 



Waddell, Anne Addison Charlottesville, Va. 

Waddell, Mabel Frances Drakes Branch, Va. 

Waddell, Mary Elizabeth Drakes Branch, Va. 

Walke, Nancy DuVal Centralia, Va. 

Walsh, Clara Elizabeth Philadelphia, Pa. 

Walsh, Virginia Lenore Cranford, N. J. 

Watkins, Marny Gresham Lottsburg, Va. 

Webb, Helen Meade Emporia, Va. 

Weed, Joyce Campbell Rutherford, N. J. 

Weisiger, Frances Evelyn Richmond, Va. 

Welch, Rae . . Fredericksburg, Va. 

Wells, Barbara Carolyn Laconia, N. H. 

West, Ethlyn Atwood Hampton, Va. 

West, Frances Lee Norfolk, Va. 

Wheat, Carolyn Rebecca Portsmouth, Va. 



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Home of Mary, the Mother of George Washington Located Just Off the Campus 




Students at Kenmore Hall 
The home of Betty Washington Lewis, the sister of General George Washington 
Located almost under the shadow of the College and in full view of the campus. 




Tomb of Mary Washington 



Standing in plain view of the campus, this simple but beautiful 
shaft marks the burial place of the mother of George Washington 
and serves as a constant and impressive tribute to high ideals and 
noble womanhood. 



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